which is the proper way to decomb a rooster

Lollipop

Songster
10 Years
Feb 12, 2009
3,107
70
244
Pike Co., GA & Palm Beach Co., FL
Here`s a good article on dubbing......Pop


Dubbing Advice - How To Dubb A Rooster. For Show Fowl, Gamefowl and OEG's
Chickens - Dubbing Tips For Show Fowl - OEG's

I've dubbed hundreds of OEs and gamefowl and the only part of dubbing I look forward to is the way they look when they're all healed, it changes their appearance dramatically. All you will need is some SHARP scissors or dubbing scissors, something to wrap the rooster in ( a slightly damp towel works good ), blood stop powder ( just in case ), a roll of paper towels, alcohol and a clean bucket of cool water. Clean the scissors and wipe them down with the alcohol, snugly wrap the rooster in the damp towel and if your lucky enough to have a good helper have them hold the bird and keep the head still by holding the comb.

I start with the wattles, pull the wattle down stretching slightly and as close the beak as you can starting from the front working your way back towards the earlobe, remove the wattle getting ALL folds and wrinkles. When the wattle is removed go to the earlobe and pinch up all you can with your off hand, WATCH HIS EAR and remove as much as you can. Repeat the procedure on the other side. I try to leave a thin strip of skin between where the wattles were, if you don't it'll look like you cut his throat, But it's OK, it'll heal. Now the comb, take your time and decide how much to leave, too little or too much and the bird will not look as good as he could have. These little roosters have a natural line that runs horizontally in their comb, use that as a guide ( I usually cut slightly above the line ).

The first thing I remove is the back part of the comb ( the blade ), cutting as close to the comb's base as you can, cut it off ( straight up and down ). Then starting at the front ( some start from the back ) as close to the beak as you can begin making the cut ( some like a straight cut, some like a slightly curved cut ). KEEP IN MIND YOU CAN'T PUT IT BACK IF YOU CUT TOO MUCH OFF. When you've completed cutting you should have a point at the back, round it off, slightly. Look him over real good to see if you need to go back and trim anything you may have missed. A good clean dubbing job makes a lot of difference at the shows.TIPS,DON'T DUB IN HOT WEATHER, their blood is thin and the game birds bleed a lot heavier.

I dub my roosters at night but early enough that I can watch them for a few hours. They are easier to catch and they settle down quicker in the dark.Sometimes you'll have one that bleeds a little heavy, when that happens I pull a downy feather from under his vent and put it over the comb and sprinkle the blood stop powder over it.TAKE YOUR TIME, it's a chore you'll want to be over and done with, BUT, poor dubbing hurts your chances at the shows.
 

BushHog936

In the Brooder
10 Years
Jun 30, 2009
50
0
29
East Texas
Very sharp knife, some down feathers, and separation from the flock is how I've seen it done personally.

Do a search there was another recent thread.. with a lot of replies.
 

BushHog936

In the Brooder
10 Years
Jun 30, 2009
50
0
29
East Texas
Breed standards may require them to be dubbed. Or if they're match birds... which I doubt though because there would be plenty of folks that have dubbed before.
 

chickbea

Songster
13 Years
Jan 18, 2007
2,181
16
201
Vermont
Quote:The only humane purpose is if the roo is going to be living in a cold climate and frostbite is a concern. Some people believe that removing large combs and wattles is better than running the risk of frostbite. Whether they lose their combs to dubbing or frostbite, it is terribly painful for the bird and supportive care needs to be given.
 

krazycow6

Songster
10 Years
May 26, 2009
407
0
121
Zephyrhills, FL
You cut game roosters because they will fight frequently and will tear the combs and wattles off of each other. You will then have a dead rooster from bleeding to death.
 

sparkles2307

Terd of Hurtles
11 Years
Oct 23, 2008
6,025
12
251
Northwestern Minnesota
OK, slight hyjack. I am VERY drawn to roos with the extra large combs and wattles, I think they are just beyond beautiful. But I am worried about the frostbite issues with being up north like we are... will I end up having to dubb them if I keep them? SHould I Just choose roos with smaller comb/wattles from the start?
 
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