wht kill coyoties?

BigBlackCock505

Hatching
May 6, 2015
1
0
7
Welcome from New Mexico!

I just started a chicken ranch

I've pwned a lot of chickens before but they've all been in salads and sandwiches and in buckets of KFC, this will be my first tiem feeding them instead of me lolololol

So I've decided on ordering 25 one-day-old chicks of varying breeds- half broilers, half layers; the large Snap Lock chicken coop, as well as a Rugged Ranch Products welded wire chicken pen with some extra cages in it for quarantining the sick ones or disciplining the naughty ones if they can't behave and act right

"But building a coop is cheap/fun"

I have no problem paying a lot of money for something if it's worth it.

Yes, this setup will cost ten times more than building a coop and twice as much as a fancy wooden kit ; but this will help keep the mess down since I will be able to periodically relocate it around the property to fertilize where needed and easily clean the setup without worry of damaging anything... and the added protection of the enclosed pen will, hopefully, stave off Coyote Holocaust long enough for the dogs to come to the rescue.

A question for my redneck friends and fam:

I know mules and llamas are bad for coyote health, but what about alpacas or huizos? Are they just as naturally vicious toward them or does their smaller stature, gentler nature and cuteness basically make them a slightly. Larger meal than the birds would
 

mermaids

Songster
6 Years
Mar 29, 2015
117
18
111
Frederick County MD
I haven't had my own alpacas, but I spin and have come gone straight to alpaca farms for shearing. From what I've seen, I cannot imagine them defending themselves successfully. They can kick, but there's not much power behind it. They can't bite. They have a docile, submissive nature and are the ones in need of a defender, hence guard llamas for them. I don't know what huizos are.
 

rides2far

Songster
5 Years
Dec 9, 2014
842
81
126
Bakersfield California
Yes, what makes it so pitiful is that the 2 stray dogs were pit bulls that someone dumped. Animal control couldn't catch them. They killed the 2 alpacas & a pony before they were finally shot & killed. They were very aggressive, but didn't kill until they were starving. I hate people who dump thei pets in the country!
 

Ifish

Chirping
Feb 28, 2015
291
40
98
PA
An LGD is much better at protecting livestock than a Donkey, llama, or alpaca.

If you don't feel like putting a .22 or 6mm projectile into a coyote, then a LGD is the only way to go. They also guard the flock from other predators that donkey's or llamas never give a second look.
 

centrarchid

Crossing the Road
11 Years
Sep 19, 2009
26,369
17,705
856
Holts Summit, Missouri
I do not like the use of the phrase "only way" when doling out advice.

Electrified poultry netting will be much cheaper than a dog of just about any breed. OP's setup should be small enough that setup cost will not be much more than the purchase cost of a typical LGD and you do not have the 1.5 to 2 years required to break in a pup.
 
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Teila

Bambrook Bantams
6 Years
Apr 15, 2013
16,612
26,047
1,026
Forrest Beach, FNQ, Australia
I do not like the use of the phrase "only way" when doling out advice.

Electrified poultry netting will be much cheaper than a dog of just about any breed. OP's setup should be small enough that setup cost will not be much more than the purchase cost of a typical LGD and you do not have the 1.5 to 2 years required to break in a pup.

x 2

Also, not much chance of an electrified poultry net accidentally or deliberately killing one of your chickens while playing ... just saying
wink.png
 
Get a jenny or a llama, I had a llama for a while with my flock. It will make a difference. If you cant get a llama, then get a .270 savage (High powered rifle) and become a fur trader.
Hopefully you get some mange spreading in the area. that will help control the yote population.
 

Ifish

Chirping
Feb 28, 2015
291
40
98
PA
I do not like the use of the phrase "only way" when doling out advice.

Electrified poultry netting will be much cheaper than a dog of just about any breed. OP's setup should be small enough that setup cost will not be much more than the purchase cost of a typical LGD and you do not have the 1.5 to 2 years required to break in a pup.


You're right. I should have phrased it differently and stated "in my opinion..."

I'm not familiar with his setup, but seemed animals to help protect the flock was the focus
 

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