Resin Shed to Comfy Coop

A photo journey through the build and redesign of resin shed to a comfortable coop.
By MrsWayne · Oct 24, 2018 · ·
Rating:
3/5,
  1. MrsWayne
    I’ve made mistakes.

    This is the first time in my life to have chickens (and ducks). We purchased four chicks and two ducklings in the Spring of 2018. Two of the chicks ended up male, both ducks are female. They spent their first months in our basement. Then a small coop that was so high I had to lift them in and out.

    They outgrew the first coop so I bought a pre-fab from a box store, and separated out the ducks. Unfortunately I put the coops in an area that water pooled after storms (especially since they decimated the grass). Most of the Summer and early Fall of 2018 was rainy so I quickly realized it would be worse in the winter.

    Enter the resin shed.

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    I chose a resin shed as the next phase of housing because of the price, and my ability to assemble. My husband helped me with the foundation.

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    I was able to piece the walls and doors together on my own. I did need help with the roof and my Dad showed up just in time.

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    I had a lot of support from the audience as I made the roosts, nesting boxes, and storage area. I think I heard some laughter as well.

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    After the first night I had to replace one roost, and secure the nest boxes better. I zip tied the nest boxes together and used the anchors that came with the building to secure them to the walls. I used the same anchors to hang the roosts. I screwed the anchors to the boards, then hung them.

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    I found an old rocker for children and made a nest in it. I put a round hanging basket in, then filled with straw. It worked!

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    I also cut more ventilation. I expanded the vents in the back, and cut more above the door. I chose the doors because they do not seem to fill a structural role in the building, and the spot is higher than the roosts. If my math is correct, I need five feet of ventilation in the building. I don't quite have that yet. I may need more in the heat of summer (it is mid October now), but I have time to plan for that.

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    I am waiting for the pop doors to be delivered. I hope to have the new run finished up before Halloween.

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    I'll add more as things progress.

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    About Author

    MrsWayne
    Robin earned a Bachelor of Science in Organizational Leadership, is President of Robin's Desktop. She is a mobile Notary Public, NNA certified Notary Signing Agent and an LSS Signing Expert. She is a published author, and freelance writer, formerly contributing columnist with the Kanawha-Putnam Ad Mailer, and Two-Lane Livin (now out of print). She enjoys upcycling, is an Airbnb Superhost, makes soaps, and breads. Now, with her chickens and ducks, is enjoying fresh eggs!
    OlympicChick and N F C like this.

Recent User Reviews

  1. N F C
    "Resin Shed Coop"
    3/5, 3 out of 5, reviewed Nov 29, 2018
    Nicely done!
  2. MROO
    "Nice shed conversion"
    3/5, 3 out of 5, reviewed Oct 31, 2018
    A nice way to build an affordable coop. Notes on ventilation are good - and the ease of construction is a real plus. In areas where dogs, coyotes or other strong "chewers" abound, the resin may be an issue. A ground-level border of hardware cloth or wire fencing around the lower portion may be a good idea.
    1. MrsWayne
      Yes. The hardware cloth along the bottom is in the plans. I have to work on placement of additional vents, and just what to make them from. I may need to order some $20 windows so there is some structure around the hole. Thanks for your input!

Comments

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  1. OlympicChick
    Love the use of the hanging basket for a nest!
      MrsWayne likes this.
  2. N F C
    That should keep the birds dry, looking good!
      MrsWayne likes this.

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