28 week old Silkie Bantam lame leg

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by TeacupandSaucer, Jan 15, 2014.

  1. TeacupandSaucer

    TeacupandSaucer Out Of The Brooder

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    Hi all hoping someone out there has some ideas on what the cause on solution are for this one. I have a 28 week old silkie pullet who a couple days ago I noticed acting out of sorts. It is the middle of winter here in Ontario Canada but every time I saw her she was outside laying down, then I realized she hadn't moved much and yesterday I found her on her side with her coop-mate standing on her. A few quick searches and a quick physical exam later and I am no further on an answer. Marek's was a first thought but the eyes are clear and she is alert (not to fond of a flashlight in her eyes), no swollen follicles either. I thought maybe egg-binding or some related disorder, an abdominal and cloacal exam reveal nothing lodged, or obstructions. Today she was quarantined in the only cage I had available and separated from here rambunctious coop-mate. Last I saw her right leg is strong enough to pull her up and she generally keeps that under her as she lays there, her left however, is splayed in front and occasionally she tries to lift it off the ground as she adjusts herself. The leg can move although reluctantly and with no force, I observed, as I examined for any breaks or dislocations. There are no breaks, and as far as I can tell no dislocations. Sorry for the long post I just want as much detail in case I am over looking something. Any thoughts?
     
  2. TeacupandSaucer

    TeacupandSaucer Out Of The Brooder

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    Oh and her poop is normal in colour and consistancy, although quantity is a little low because I don't think she has been eating much or drinking.
     
  3. realsis

    realsis Crazy for Silkies

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    I'm very sorry to say it does sound like it could be Mareks. Mareks can be as subtle as a limp or as vigorous as paralysis. However some vitamin defiencies can cause similar symptoms.i would try a multi vitamin to rule that out.if she does not improve with the vitamin I would seriously consider Mareks disease. There are different forms of Mareks that manifest in different ways and different parts of the body can be affected. Basically Mareks creates tumors in the body like a cancer and those tumors press on nerves causing the paralysis and out stretched legs.was she vaccinated against Mareks? Can you post a picture of her? That might be helpful. From What you describe my first thought is Mareks. I'm sad to say.however try a good vitamin and see if she might respond to that. I do sincerely hope I'm wrong about the Mareks. I wish you the very best.
     
    Last edited: Jan 15, 2014
  4. TeacupandSaucer

    TeacupandSaucer Out Of The Brooder

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    As I think about it more little details.... A few days before I noticed the silkie we lost one of our lovebirds we had had for almost 2 years. I assumed old age (not sure what age she was rescued at), she was squaking her usual self at night then the morning she was dead. There is a patio door between them and the coop but depending on the disease I may have transferred during my daily rounds.
     
  5. TeacupandSaucer

    TeacupandSaucer Out Of The Brooder

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    The pictures aren't great seeing as she is usually just a poof-ball anyways. We have two pullets and they were both bought from a hobby farmer as chicks, first time at chickens so I didn't think to ask, I doubt they were vaccined. I raised them with SuperBooster as recommended for a few of the usual infections.
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    If this is Marek's, in someone elses experience, cull or hope she survives? I can live with the paralysis but I worry she won't get around and will stay outside and get frostbite. She is warm and toasty inside for now.
     
  6. realsis

    realsis Crazy for Silkies

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    I would continue to keep her inside and give a good vitamin regiment to rule out that the cause is from deficiency. If she does not respond to that treatment them I would think sadly it's likely mareks. May I make a suggestion? Their is a great thread here in emergency called something like Not A emergency Mareks in my flock. Many people on that thread are VERY knowledgeable about mareks disease and have done extensive study on mareks and they have this disease in their flocks right now. They would be able to answer ANY questions you might have and can help you move forward in a positive direction. What I know is mareks is a highly contagious air borne disease. It is latterly every where. It can stay on land for years. Usually if one has it it does NOT mean the other birds will display symptoms but it DOES mean the other birds that were in contact with the mareks bird which is likely the flock are now carriers of mareks and although not sick themselves with symptoms CAN infect other birds. As a precaution any more birds that are brought onto the property should be Vaccinated and have ample time at the very least 14 days some say more before exposure. Exposure would mean contact with the outside or adult birds. This time is given for the bird to develop immunity and antibodies in their system against the virus. It's very important this time is given after vaccination. The vaccine is NOT 100% effective but that are nd breeding for resistance is all we can do for now. If isolation time is not given after vaccine and the bird is exposed to outside or adult birds before they had a chance to develop immunity and antibodies it's very likely they will catch the mareks.so time must be given for the antibodies production before introduction. As for your question I would seek advice on the not a.emergency mareks in my flock thread.i am certain they can be of great help And answer any question you may have. They are dealing with this as well and are very educated in mareks and can be of great help and advice. Many deal with this in different ways and I'm sure they can help you move forward in a positive direction. They have many ideas.and can advice you the best on how to move forward.some cull some breed for resistance some fashion little splints to help their birds be more comfortable many have various ideas that can help you get through this. So I HIGHLY recommend you speak with them concerning your bird.I'm confident they can help. Before you make any decisions do ask questions on that thread and they can be of great help.most are experts on mareks. I do hope this is helpful. I would still try the vitamin to rule out a deficiency. But she does appear to have mareks. Read read read be cause knowledge can be a great weapon against mareks.and do go to suggested thread in this forum.im positive they can help you move forward and advise you in a positive direction. I wish you the very best of luck.im certain that thread will be a great help. God bless and like I said before you make any Decisions speak with some of those folks on the thread and get your questions answered.they really know their stuff. God bless.
     
    1 person likes this.
  7. TeacupandSaucer

    TeacupandSaucer Out Of The Brooder

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    Thanks for the help realsis, I have started vitamins as she will take them, it has been a few days with no improvement. She struggles on her side and has eaten very little, if anything, she drinks but barely. I checked out the other forum and without the time to read through thousands of posts, I found little comment on culling birds in this condition. Rather people have chosen to live with birds that do not present such debilitating cases and the rest have dies on their own. At this point I want her to die on her own, I don't know if I can bring myself to cull a cuddly pet chicken, she was never raised to be killed but as a pet. When/If she goes it would also leave my other female all alone. Chickens are flock birds but how do they deal with solitude?
     
  8. ten chicks

    ten chicks Chillin' With My Peeps

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    No frostbite on her foot/leg,it may be difficult to see as silkies have black skin and necrotic tissue is black(dead tissue). Lift up her feathers and check her foot/leg very carefully,look for swelling,you might notice some discoloration.

    Run your thumb down the back of her leg from top where it joins body(hock)to shank(scales start)you are looking for a slipped tendon. If the tendon has slipped,you will feel it,it feels like an elastic band and if you press on it,you can feel it snap back into place. Run thumb down back of both legs so that you can feel any differences. I am currently dealing with a slipped tendon in a large rooster,had been treating him for a sprain,but with no improvement decided it has to be tendon issue,sure enough found it when checking his legs. Pressed tendon back into place and he immediately stood taller and was walking better. I also stretch tendon,by gently pulling leg backwards like they would do when normally stretching. I also give him aspirin for pain,as tendons are painful.

    Have you checked her for crop issues such as an impact,hard to tell from picture,but her crop looks full for one not eating. Have you lifted up feathers /wings and checked over for any wounds?
     
    Last edited: Jan 20, 2014
  9. TeacupandSaucer

    TeacupandSaucer Out Of The Brooder

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    No wounds or frostbite, skin is normal. I did examine her legs from toe to hip with no noticeable abnormalities, then again wasn't sure what to look for. Thanks for the detail I will give her another look over.
     
  10. TeacupandSaucer

    TeacupandSaucer Out Of The Brooder

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    without more experience I can not seem to find a slipped tendon, everything feels normal, although she has seemed to have lost weight. She is definitely uncomfortable when I move her legs to stretch them. Both legs want to spring back in front of her rather than stay in any position.
     

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