A century of Turkey talk 2000-2100.

Discussion in 'Turkeys' started by duluthralphie, Apr 5, 2015.

  1. Flashpoint

    Flashpoint Crowing

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    My current little ones have some growing to do yet. :) There are 5, but one is still camera shy.

    20190623_185822.jpg
     
    rjohns39, CindyinSD, memphis and 4 others like this.
  2. SA Farm

    SA Farm Crowing

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    I decided I liked the idea of lapper training... I think I made a little progress with Missy, here, but mostly I just got covered in turkey poo :sick
    AD32491D-9BB1-4983-B700-351ED3CAAB03.jpeg
     
  3. memphis

    memphis Free Ranging

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    Keep at it SAFarm! A good lapper is woth it!
     
  4. Flashpoint

    Flashpoint Crowing

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    Near Cumberland, MD
    Morning, everyone. I have a question (surprise!)

    My eggs arrived yesterday, very well packaged and 4-5 days from when they were actually laid. I set them aside to let the eggs "settle" from shipping.

    My question is - when I candled prior to leaving them sit - I could not see any air cells. Is this normal? Yes, I have looked it up and MOST of what I find is how to work around with air cell issues that you can see (saddle, sideways, bubbles). Very little useful information on air cells otherwise. (even one article about how air cells can determine sex of chick!)

    I only found 1 article that stated the absence of a visible air cell is that if the eggs are really fresh, the air cell may be extremely small. I do understand that the contents of the egg "dehydrate" and air then comes through the pores of the shell to create the air cell.

    Am I worried over nothing at this point? I can go ahead and place them in the incubator after my 18-24 "settlement wait"?

    :oops::old

    Edited to add: I am assuming they were Not gathered just prior to shipping as the guy told my sister he had a few eggs just prior to her ordering them.
     
  5. Flashpoint

    Flashpoint Crowing

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    Near Cumberland, MD
    Sorry, I am very "needy" today! lol

    Square footage question.

    I am revamping my run area by adding approx 7-foot high hardware cloth fencing. Yet to be determined is what I will use for a "roof cover", and I plan on adding electric fencing top and bottom.

    The run area will be approximately 50' by 40' and include my "chicken shed" which is approx 20' x 20'.

    My current plans are to have approx 30 chickens of various breeds and approx 15 turkeys including hopefully a trio of midget whites.

    Plus, they have a fenced area of approximately an acre to free range on.

    This should be more than a sufficient amount of room for the flock?

    I am trying to get this as right as I can and figure whatever I do will probably outlast me. :D
     
    SA Farm, CindyinSD, memphis and 2 others like this.
  6. R2elk

    R2elk Free Ranger

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    Natrona County, Wyoming
    Really fresh eggs are difficult to see the air cells especially if the air cells are not detached. It is a good thing if you are not noticing the air cells rolling around.

    I allow shipped hatching eggs to rest while they are warming up. If they are already good and warm, I put them directly in the incubator. Once they are in the incubator, I turn on the turner and let things run their course until it is time for lockdown.

    I stopped candling shipped hatching eggs when they are received. Candling them at that time will not change anything for the positive but can be detrimental depending on how much they are turned and wiggled around trying to see what is going on in the egg.

    I have done the wait game and all the other recommended methods for dealing with shipped hatching eggs and have not found any of the advised methods to do any better than just warming up the eggs and getting them into the incubator. I have not found any improvement by not turning the eggs for a period of time but have seen the studies which prove that the most important time for the eggs to be turned is the earliest stages of incubation.
     
  7. R2elk

    R2elk Free Ranger

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    Natrona County, Wyoming
    That should be fine. Mine have a 50'x100' run in addition to the coop. They also have an approximate 2 acre fenced area consisting of diverse grasses and trees along with a goldfish pond they get to free range in daily.
     
  8. Bantambird

    Bantambird Crowing

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    Montana
    I just finished adding deer net fencing over the top of my run because it's time to separate the pullets so they can be taught where to lay and start getting layer mash along with the hens. Deer fence is 7 feet tall and pretty thick plastic, won't keep out climbers like coons or weasel or mink, but will keep girls in, and owls and Hawks and eagles out. Only really have coons, skunks, and neighborhood dogs here anyways, my weird location keeps most ground predators away due to being in between the interstates. Noisy and curiously private at the same time.
     
  9. memphis

    memphis Free Ranging

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    Flashpoint....your not needy, good questions! Mine have a 16x16 combo coop and run. The back one fourth has boards on two sides and the back. That's were their roosts are. It's for a wind block during the winter, or tornado! Its completely covered with a corrugated roof. But they free range all day and are only in there at night, or to lay an egg, or if I need to confine them for some reason. I have to lick up Daisy when I mow or am hosting an event involving food. They will steal food off people's plates.
     
  10. memphis

    memphis Free Ranging

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    I also hang box fans around the coop/run thing during the summer.
     

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