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a green bill?

Discussion in 'Ducks' started by griffinheather, Aug 15, 2011.

  1. griffinheather

    griffinheather Out Of The Brooder

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    May 14, 2011
    Alexandria, LA
    One of my ducks was attacked by a dog and was badly injured w/ a small patch of missing feathers/raw skin on the back of the neck and a deep puncture wound on it's chest. I cleaned and packed the puncture w/ calcium alginate dressing, provodine and antibiotic ointment. We've made it through two nights so far, but today I noticed his bill has turned a greenish color. He's drinking water & pooping (not eating). Any ideas or advice?
     
  2. Amiga

    Amiga Overrun with Runners Premium Member

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    What kind of duck and how old? Some of my runners developed green highlights on their bills at around three or four months of age. A year later, they all have black, or black with blue highlights.
     
  3. griffinheather

    griffinheather Out Of The Brooder

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    May 14, 2011
    Alexandria, LA
    a mallard, female, 3-4 months old. Her companion is a healthy looking beige color.
     
  4. Amiga

    Amiga Overrun with Runners Premium Member

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    That's close to the age my runners (descended from mallards) started with the greenish highlights. Zehn's bill changed color, quickly it seemed to me, when she was about a year old. So the color change was pretty quick (unless I missed something).

    I wonder if the trauma of the attack may have affected the duck's biochemistry and caused the bill to change color, or if it was going to change anyway and because you are watching so closely you noticed.

    Regarding the eating - after trauma, a body sometimes does not provide much blood flow around the stomach, so not eating is not too worrisome unless it goes too long. And too long is something I just use my instincts to decide. So, I'd offer just a little of a favorite treat to see what happens, but mostly be sure she's getting plenty of clean water, in a safe clean (I know with ducks it's relative) environment, and vitamins/electrolytes/probiotics in addition to careful wound care.

    Goodness. I pray all will be well soon.

    Poor ducky.
     
  5. griffinheather

    griffinheather Out Of The Brooder

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    May 14, 2011
    Alexandria, LA
    Thank you. she's moving around a bit in the box i have her in and keeps watching me as i move around the kitchen. unfortunatly i lost four silkies (i have a silkie in a box next to miss maynerd on the kitchen cabinet w/ a rear-end missing a little skin & feathers), and three baby chicks. i hate to lose my precise miss maynerd too. we'll keep our fingers crossed!
     
  6. Amiga

    Amiga Overrun with Runners Premium Member

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    Do you have a vet who could provide some oral antibiotics? Or do you know what kind and dosage might work on a duck? It occurs to me that one of the risks after being bitten is infection in the bloodstream. Just a random thought. I know you're doing all you can.
     
  7. griffinheather

    griffinheather Out Of The Brooder

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    May 14, 2011
    Alexandria, LA
    I was going to give it a couple of days and see how she reacts. If she seems to have an infection or starts to act worse I'll get some duramicine (a basic antibiotic) and give the same dosage that I would for my chickens. I just wanted someone more savy w/ ducks to give me their ideas too.

    Thanks!!
     

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