Activated Charcoal

azygous

Crossing the Road
10 Years
Dec 11, 2009
18,341
22,204
912
Colorado Rockies
Not recommended for daily diet of chickens. Activated charcoal can slow down the digestive and bowel processes. It can interfere with nutrient absorption and block some of them due to its ability to bind with some elements.

And you may have a problem adjusting to the sight of coal black chicken poop.
 

Nay

Songster
Sep 19, 2017
119
320
146
Fife, Scotland
Not recommended for daily diet of chickens. Activated charcoal can slow down the digestive and bowel processes. It can interfere with nutrient absorption and block some of them due to its ability to bind with some elements.

And you may have a problem adjusting to the sight of coal black chicken poop.
Thank you, that's really helpful!
Would it be helpful in case of a specific emergency? Ie would it be useful to have it on hand?
 

TwoCrows

Inuit Raven
Staff member
Premium member
8 Years
Mar 21, 2011
39,845
53,003
1,412
New Mexico, USA
My Coop
My Coop
When my first flock contracted MS (Mycoplasma Synoviea) the flock could be found in the garden EVERY day hunting for the wood stove charcoal that I dumped in there one year for the soil. OMG it drove me nuts to find them in there eating SO much charcoal! :barnie They ate it like a starving chicken on treats and I couldn't keep them from flying over the fence! Chickens somehow know what they need to survive, it did help dry up their diarrhea oddly enough and absorb toxins from the bacteria. When I finally got a handle on the MS, the charcoal was no longer interesting to them.

All this being said, charcoal is used for cases of toxicity in poultry and in cases of intestinal issues, it may come in handy.
 

centrarchid

Free Ranging
10 Years
Sep 19, 2009
23,935
13,466
696
Holts Summit, Missouri
For some reason chickens here go out of there way to consume the charcoal left from incompletely burning wood. It is not ground or powdered.

I have also mixed biochar into chicken feed without I'll effects for as long as 2 weeks.

There are studies out of Australia where biochar fed to cattle.
 

Red-Stars-in-RI

Songster
5 Years
Mar 24, 2014
380
774
186
Rhode Island
I’ve seen mention of bio char both in chicken feed and bedding - in the bedding to reduce odor (especially ammonia).

For egg layers I could see black getting on the eggs, tracked into nesting boxes on their feet.

I have no personal experience at scale beyond putting some clean wood ash with a tiny bit of char left in it in the run for them to scratch at and dust bathe.
 

Juther

Chirping
Feb 27, 2018
63
54
81
I put a half charcoal-ed log into my egg house last year. It just stays in the corner and they peck it whenever they need it. I wouldn't suggest adding it to their feed or forcing them to eat it, unless they ingested a known poison.
 

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