Anyone here have Fibromyalgia?

Discussion in 'Random Ramblings' started by jackiedon, Oct 18, 2007.

  1. bobbieguyette

    bobbieguyette Songster

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    Jan 12, 2007
    Rain just does me in I hate rain and hurt alot just before it starts too.I had a lot of neck problems in jan and they finally figured out with xrays and mri that i now have arthritis in my neck.dont know if it goes with the fibro or not but now that that pain to go with it also I would worry and see the dr if the pain really starts to bother you! and hope you have a good understanding dr. not alot of them are unfortunatly I also use alot of bengay its my new perfume I swear!!LOL!Now im trying to figure out how to make rice socks that i can warm up in the microwave and not have the hard rice drive me nuts on my feet! would be nice if i could tho...
     
  2. jackiedon

    jackiedon Songster

    Jun 4, 2007
    Central Arkansas
    Taz,

    I would just watch it and remind your reg dr what your OB said. They may want to send you to a RHeum just to check it out. If you have swelling definiately go to a RHeum.

    The rice bags and socks are great. My niece is a home healh PT assistant and she bought a bunch of socks and rice and made all of her patients the rice socks to help with the pain.

    When I had a ruptured disc in the neck I filled a sock full of corn meal and it was really soft to lay on.

    The only bad thing about planning your day around rain the boss just doesn't get it.

    jackie
     
  3. hollyclyff

    hollyclyff Songster

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    May 18, 2007
    NC
    I use flax seed for my heat packs. It's nice and soft and holds heat well.
     
  4. BlueDevilGirl67

    BlueDevilGirl67 In the Brooder

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    Aug 30, 2007
    Central NC
    I don't have it but my oldest sister does and she is just miserable.
     
  5. eggcetra_farms

    eggcetra_farms Songster

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    Jun 26, 2007
    San Antonio, TX
    Quote:I bet you have Raynaud's like I do. Do your hands and/or feet look purple at times and red & white blotches at others? My hands and feet are cold all the time. Look it up and see how you compare.
     
  6. dixieschicks

    dixieschicks In the Brooder

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    Sep 30, 2007
    CUSTER PARK ILLINOIS
    good evening everyone! yes, its raining here, damp and cold in Illinois and I am trying to go to sleep, but keep tossing and turning with all the aches in neck and shoulders and hips. so I am doing one of my favorite thing and reading all your informative posts. I am new to joining the site, but I have been reading your comments for awhile, afraid to say something stupid. Dont quite no the lingo yet either, like what is DH?

    When I first learned I had fibro I read an article about a homemade moist heat supply made with a tube sock, white uncooked rice and some shoe string or something to tie off the end, compatible with not burning up in the microwave.

    Just take an old tube sock, fill almost to the top with white uncooked rice and tie off.

    Put in micro for one minute. Then test that it is not to hot, but what is nice about it is that it conforms, and will bend to lay around your neck, bend around your knee or whatever!

    You can also make another (if you have the mate to the sock)! and keep one in the freezer, it makes a good "ice pack" if you will when you need cold.

    The moisture is released from the rice and really feels good. (has a little odor) but not unpleasant! Just don't over cook! hope this helps!
     
  7. jackiedon

    jackiedon Songster

    Jun 4, 2007
    Central Arkansas
    Dixie,

    Don't worry about asking question. DH means Dear Husband or I guess it could mean Darn Husband.

    The rice soxes are great.

    I've been off work for about a week and a half, I'm having a really bad flare. Dr. gave me a round of steriods but not doing a lot of good. I go back to the dr. Monday.

    I hope you get to feeling better.

    jackie
     
  8. bobbieguyette

    bobbieguyette Songster

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    Jan 12, 2007
    I bet you have Raynaud's like I do. Do your hands and/or feet look purple at times and red & white blotches at others? My hands and feet are cold all the time. Look it up and see how you compare.
    What is this? I have the same thing and just thought it was another thing going on with having fibro!
     
  9. eggcetra_farms

    eggcetra_farms Songster

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    Jun 26, 2007
    San Antonio, TX
    Bobbie (and anyone else who's interested). Here's some info on Raynaud's Phenomenon from Yahoo Health.
    What is Raynaud's phenomenon?

    Raynaud's phenomenon is a condition in which blood flow to the surface tissue of the hands and feet is temporarily decreased, usually as an overresponse to cold temperatures. There are two kinds of Raynaud's phenomenon. Primary Raynaud's, also known as Raynaud's disease, occurs by itself and is the most common form. Secondary Raynaud's, also called Raynaud's syndrome, occurs as part of another disease and usually begins after age 35.

    Raynaud's phenomenon is common but often goes unreported. For most people with the condition, Raynaud's is more a nuisance than a disability.

    What causes Raynaud's phenomenon?
    Primary Raynaud's has no known cause. Secondary Raynaud's may develop as a result of another disease such as lupus, scleroderma, rheumatoid arthritis, or atherosclerosis. Other causes of secondary Raynaud's include taking certain medications, using vibrating power tools for several years, smoking, or having frostbite.

    Exposure to cold is the most common trigger of an attack of Raynaud's phenomenon. In cold conditions, the body normally conserves heat by narrowing (constricting) blood vessels to the skin and opening (dilating) blood vessels to warm the internal parts of the body. During an attack of Raynaud's phenomenon, the body overreacts and severely restricts the flow of blood through small vessels to the skin. Emotional stress or certain medications can also trigger an attack. An attack of Raynaud's phenomenon usually lasts only a few minutes, but in some cases it may last over an hour, especially if the surrounding temperature remains low.

    What are the symptoms?
    During an attack of Raynaud's, the small blood vessels (capillaries) that supply blood to the skin narrow (constrict), limiting blood flow to the hands and feet or, less commonly, the nose or ears. This often causes fingers or toes to feel cold and numb and then turn white. As blood flow returns and the fingers warm, they may turn blue, then red, and begin to throb and become painful.

    How is Raynaud's phenomenon diagnosed?
    Raynaud's phenomenon is diagnosed through a medical history and physical examination. There are no simple tests that can be used to diagnose the condition, so your health professional will rely on your description of your symptoms. Blood tests or other tests may be used to rule out other conditions that may be causing your symptoms.

    How is it treated?
    You may be able to prevent or relieve symptoms and limit attacks by avoiding the triggers of Raynaud's. Keep your body warm at all times. If you feel cold, your body will naturally redirect blood from your hands and feet to the central part of your body. If you can't keep the surrounding temperature above 68° (20°) to 70° (21.1°), wear extra layers of clothing to remain warm. Also, reduce anxiety, quit smoking, and avoid medications or other substances that trigger attacks, such as caffeine, cold medications that contain pseudoephedrine, and beta-blocker medications. If necessary, medication, such as a calcium channel blocker, may be prescribed to increase blood flow to the hands and feet and to relieve symptoms.

    To keep hands and feet warm, wear mittens or gloves when it is cold outside, use potholders or oven mitts when getting something from the refrigerator or freezer, and wear wool or synthetic socks rather than pure cotton socks. Running warm water over your hands will often increase blood flow to them. Swinging your arms in a circle at the side of your body ("windmilling") can temporarily increase blood flow into your fingers.​
     
  10. LoneCowboy

    LoneCowboy Songster

    Aug 26, 2007
    Longmont, CO
    I don't think I have that, but I might. I call my feet the great cold suckers. I can take my socks off and climb into bed, and I swear they suck up the cold from the sheets. [​IMG] I'm afraid to expose them to the outside for fear that they will suck up all the cold in the universe. But I don't notice them turning colors or hurting when the finally get warm. My hands aren't as bad, but sometimes my nose gets really cold in the middle of the night. I just can't seem to regulate my body temp. If I get cold, the only thing to do, is take a hot bath, that's the only way I can get warm to the bone.
     

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