Australia - Six states..and that funny little island.

Discussion in 'Where am I? Where are you!' started by duckyfromoz, Nov 16, 2011.

  1. SampyArctica

    SampyArctica Chillin' With My Peeps

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    TheChookPatch - I have four girls: a GLW, Coro Sussex - both are just shy of six weeks old - and a Black Australorp and a Red Star, who are approximately one year old now. [​IMG] Soon to be six girls, but waiting until my two young'uns (the GLW and Sussex) are permanently out of the brooder.

    And thanks, satay! [​IMG]

    SydneyChickens - I used an ordinary 75w bulb for the first few weeks, and when the chicks got more feathers, switched to a 60w. I just made sure that they were the ones that actually give off heat before the energy saving bulbs became popular, so I had to go and actually buy them as we only have the energy saving bulbs throughout my house. Chicks were (and are!) happy. It's fairly simple though, or, I thought it was - because the chicks will let you know if they're cold or not. If they are, they'll be directly under the bulb and might chirp frequently, and if they're not - they'll be off roaming the brooder, settling down on the outskirts of where the heat is directed. Just keep an eye on them. [​IMG]

    I didn't think people would have massive enough brooders for a chick to lose it's way back to heat, though...****, I wonder how big some brooders can be...I just used an old (albeit large) plastic storage container with half of the lid cut out and chicken wire cable tied over the top. Seemed to do the job. -shrug- Chicks were never sick or complained about being cold... [​IMG]

    - Edited, because I just realised it was 75 watt bulb I used, and not 100. It was in an ordinary desk lamp that has a flexible neck, so I had it hanging over the side of the container, but under the lid, so it was closer and the chicks could get warm easier, and then moved it later to sitting on top of the lid but with the 'neck' bent as low as possible to the chicken wire before switching to the 60 watt. Checked on my chicks about every half hour at a minimum to definitely make sure they weren't too cold, but they were always roaming around the brooder and seemed content enough. I don't think I ever once saw them huddling directly under the lamp. -
     
    Last edited: Dec 2, 2013
  2. SydneyChickens

    SydneyChickens Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Sampy you're a god send! Hahaha thanks so much for the advise! I was originally going to make a wooden brooder but then i thought a plastic tub will be better because it's easier to clean out and give a good scrub at the end of it all..

    This brooder where the poor little buggers wonder off was MASSIVE! Mine will not be so big hahaha.
     
  3. Fancychooklady

    Fancychooklady Chicken Obsessed

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    Sydney, if you can get the red reptile lamp you will kill 2 birds with 1 stone. Light and heat. I only use the 75 w. Yes with the ceramic one they don't seem to be able to find their way home.
     
    1 person likes this.
  4. appps

    appps Overrun With Chickens

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    Sydney if you do decide to go ceramic just make sure you also have a ceramic batten that it screws into. They can melt the plastic ones and cause fire.

    Oh and we bought our red heat lamp (helps them sleep better at night) off eBay pretty cheap when our cockatiel was a baby and we needed heat.
     
    Last edited: Dec 2, 2013
    1 person likes this.
  5. SampyArctica

    SampyArctica Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Haha, no worries...there's of course plenty of different ways to get the job done, that's just how my setup was and like I said, my chicks never complained or seemed uncomfortable once. As long as you keep an eye on the chicks and check them regularly, I don't think you can really go wrong. And yeah, cleaning it out is so easy!

    I wasn't sure if I really made sense with how I had my lamp, so I took a couple of pictures...

    This is how it was first set up (just the lamp, ignore all the stuff in the brooder):

    [​IMG]

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    And then when they had enough feather covering:

    [​IMG]


    And these were the first bulbs (guess they weren't regular household bulbs after all! But they were in the same aisle, so easy enough to find...), which worked great and only had to use one before switching to 60 watts. Never blew/overheated or anything:

    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Dec 2, 2013
  6. Fancychooklady

    Fancychooklady Chicken Obsessed

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    Depends how many chicks you are going to raise . I have a timber babies cot. It has meat safe mesh in it and a hinged top. I may have 12-30 chicks in there at one time. The plastic tubs are great for a couple of chicks, but the chicks grow and they may also need the space to escape the heat. I have a reptile lamp on a chain that can be moved higher as the chicks require less heat. The cheaper red bulbs retail for $7.95 , but you should always keep a spare, cause they generally blow at about 8 pm on a Sunday night , when everything is closed.[​IMG]
    [​IMG]
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  7. SampyArctica

    SampyArctica Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Yeah, exactly. It worked fine for me because I only had two. [​IMG] I wouldn't still be using it if I had even one more, they would have definitely moved out earlier!
     
  8. rexy

    rexy Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Fancy, a babies cot, that is a brilliant idea. :D
     
  9. Fancychooklady

    Fancychooklady Chicken Obsessed

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    Rexy, this is like no other cot I have ever seen. It's from the early 1900 s and unique to tassie. It is completely enclosed to stop mozzies and flies getting at bub, while mum was out in the field picking hops. I will take a pic of it and post tomorrow. I have some ducklings in there ATM.
     
  10. rexy

    rexy Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Even a normal old timber cot would be good though, wouldn't it?
     

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