Barnevelder breeders lets work together and improve the breed

Dr Bjorn Netland

Songster
11 Years
Jan 4, 2009
168
31
137
This pullet would have been Reserve Large Fowl if it were not missing a tail feather...or maybe it was not quite in. Both of us liked it better than the Wyandotte. These are the kinds of wins that promote the breed. I had never seen Barnevelders like this before this show.

Walt
Barnie breeders should pay particular attention to the overall shape/outline of this pullet...look at that back line! The SOP needs to address this in better detail...The most recent issue of the German "Gefluegel" magazine has a superb article on the Barnies with excellent pictures. Most of our birds have a very faulty back/tail set, though some breeders have made great progress in that regard. This pullet should be held up as the type we should all be breeding toward.
 

fowlman01

Crowing
9 Years
Sep 2, 2010
5,475
1,070
356
Sonoma County CA
Barnie breeders should pay particular attention to the overall shape/outline of this pullet...look at that back line! The SOP needs to address this in better detail...The most recent issue of the German "Gefluegel" magazine has a superb article on the Barnies with excellent pictures. Most of our birds have a very faulty back/tail set, though some breeders have made great progress in that regard. This pullet should be held up as the type we should all be breeding toward.
Most of the Barnies shown in the US are faulty. ...all of the ones I have seen certainly are.

The APA Standard says: Tail of female.....full with graceful, uniform sweep, carried high up to 50 degree's above horizontal. I'm not sure what more detail could be added without the description being in more detail than every other tail description on the SOP. People just need to look at the illustrations and read the tail description. This pullet should be used as an example of a very good Barnie female, but it goes beyond the excellent tail this pullet has. This bird has most things it needs.....a great example of the breed.

Walt
 

NYREDS

Crowing
12 Years
Jan 14, 2008
5,644
427
303
Most of the Barnies shown in the US are faulty. ...all of the ones I have seen certainly are.

The APA Standard says: Tail of female.....full with graceful, uniform sweep, carried high up to 50 degree's above horizontal. I'm not sure what more detail could be added without the description being in more detail than every other tail description on the SOP. People just need to look at the illustrations and read the tail description. This pullet should be used as an example of a very good Barnie female, but it goes beyond the excellent tail this pullet has. This bird has most things it needs.....a great example of the breed.

Walt

Agreed. On the rare occasion I see a Barnvelder entered in a show here in the Northeast I sort of take the owners word for it as they generally don't look much like they should. Colour & type are both a problem.
 

Dr Bjorn Netland

Songster
11 Years
Jan 4, 2009
168
31
137
Most of the Barnies shown in the US are faulty. ...all of the ones I have seen certainly are.

The APA Standard says: Tail of female.....full with graceful, uniform sweep, carried high up to 50 degree's above horizontal. I'm not sure what more detail could be added without the description being in more detail than every other tail description on the SOP. People just need to look at the illustrations and read the tail description. This pullet should be used as an example of a very good Barnie female, but it goes beyond the excellent tail this pullet has. This bird has most things it needs.....a great example of the breed.

Walt
Walt, comparing the description of, e.g., the Leghorn and the Barnevelder as concerns tail and back, according to my recollection, the description for the Leghorn is more specific. Case in point, the Barnevelder standard says nothing about the tail spread and feather width, which would be a great help to have specified for breeders, as it probably is for Leghorns. Also, I feel that the back contour could be more specific for the Barnevelder, as I think it is for Leghorns (at least as far as I can recall). I would suggest that specifying the sweep starting from the bottom of the neck towards the tail (as Piet's pullet demonstrates and breeders in Germany, at least, have specified in their standard) would be more helpful...as the Leghorn standard has been to me and many other breeders for many years. Please note that these are simply my observations and suggestions, and others may have other--and far better--ideas.

Bjorn
 

Happy Chooks

Free Ranging
Premium Feather Member
10 Years
Jul 9, 2009
40,414
3,506
596
Northern CA
My Coop
She looks like she could be a welsummer. She will lay or should lay a nice dark terracotta colored eggs almost as dark as a Marans. Or at least mine do.
There is no way that bird is a welsummer. I also breed them, and it's nothing like a wellie. It's a Partridge Rock.

Quote: I keep going back and staring at it. I'd love to see some better pictures of Piet's cockerels that he showed as well.

3 of the cockerels I'm growing out for breeders (I have 5 and still making the decisions on which 2 will stay) have a nice, concave back line. I've hatched barnie cockerels from multiple sources and this is the first time I've had a concave back line in any that I have grown out.
 

Happy Chooks

Free Ranging
Premium Feather Member
10 Years
Jul 9, 2009
40,414
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Northern CA
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Quote: I really don't want to pick on Piet's bird, because they are stunning. But I would like to clarify something, is the pullets (in the top picture) tail too high for the American SOP? In my eye, it looks more than 50 degrees. I double checked by holding a protractor up to it.

Again, I'm not critiquing Piet's bird in any way, I'd just like some more information, so I can learn for my flock.
 
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Bitterroot

Songster
7 Years
Jul 22, 2012
421
28
118
Montana
Hi guys. I sent a couple PMs and posted in the classifieds, but I hope it's okay to ask here as well. I'm looking for some double laced Barnevelders, mix of both blue and regular hatching eggs (or chicks). Anyone got anything for sale this time of year? I'm looking for a dozen plus if I can get them. Thanks!
 
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Dr Bjorn Netland

Songster
11 Years
Jan 4, 2009
168
31
137
I really don't want to pick on Piet's bird, because they are stunning. But I would like to clarify something, is the pullets (in the top picture) tail too high for the American SOP? In my eye, it looks more than 50 degrees. I double checked by holding a protractor up to it.

Again, I'm not critiquing Piet's bird in any way, I'd just like some more information, so I can learn for my flock.
No, I agree with Walt Leonard. I also checked the angle and, in my figuring, the tail is right around 50 degrees or just a tad lower. What is especially impressive to me is that the rise starts at the bottom of the neck in a gradual, elegant sweep to the tail. Personally, I have NEVER seen a Barnie pullet that good here in North America, including the ones we hatched out from eggs imported from top breeders in the Netherlands. Then again, this is simply a personal observation on my part and is not meant to be the words of wisdom from the oracle...
 

Happy Chooks

Free Ranging
Premium Feather Member
10 Years
Jul 9, 2009
40,414
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Northern CA
My Coop
Quote: I agree, Piet's pullet is fantastic.

Okay, now I see where I went wrong. I checked my SOP and the tail angle is measured from the back line. (back to reading the first 40 pages again) My eye was including the body.

I do have some pullets with that "Nike swoosh" shape to their back, though I'm not sure their tails are that high. (I don't think they are far off though) I need to get some current pictures of them so I can really critique the crud out of them. I sit out and watch them, but they don't listen well when you want them to stand still.
 
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