Beloved dog attacked beloved chickens. UPDATE-BOTH GONE pg 5 :-(

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by egglicious, Oct 7, 2011.

  1. Jamie_Dog_Trainer

    Jamie_Dog_Trainer Chillin' With My Peeps

    Jul 8, 2008
    Washington State
    Hi there [​IMG]

    First I want to say, you're chickens will be ok as long as there's not any permament or deadly physical damage. Chickens seem to forget bad experiences quickly and return to normal behavior. They will be ok emotionally. [​IMG]

    Second to address your dog. You've learned a tough lesson, and one I'm sure you won't forget. But be assured you can help your dog with training. Of course you need to fix your fencing so it's dog proof. The dog needs to learn that negative interactions with the chickens (ie, barking at, chasing, running after) are NOT tolerated. Ever. Put him on leash when he goes out. Bring treats with you if he's food motivated. Do some fun obedience work near the chicken pen, and correct him with a stern NO! and quickly move away from the chickens if he focuses too much on them or barks. You can do this.

    I will warn you though, that if you want the training to stick, you'll have to work on this for several weeks! Don't give him the opportunity to be too aggressive with the chickens. He needs to know you are in charge of his behavior and learn to work with you and focus on YOU instead of the birds. Use food or toys to motivate and be consisten [​IMG] Good luck
     
  2. FourPawz

    FourPawz Chillin' With My Peeps

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    When you're teaching the dog to look at you instead of the birds, you don't want to say his name while waving the food under his nose. Say his name, get him to look at you and then pull out the treat for him. That way, you aren't bribing him to look at you.
     
  3. Newwell

    Newwell Chillin' With My Peeps

    Quote:Thanks for the good suggestions about training. I will be working with my Rocky Dog tomorrow, the Shih Tzu.
     
  4. flowerchicks

    flowerchicks Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Quote:This works, it is how I trained my dogs. I got my first chickens 2 1/2 yrs ago, when I had a 2 yr old cattle dog and a 3 yr old husky. The husky picked up almost immediately that the chickens were OFF LIMITS, but the cattle dog wanted to herd/chase/play/eat etc.. I put her on a short leash and we all hung out in the yard with the chickens. If she showed intense focus, she got a correction. As she started to pay less attention, the leash got longer, until it was 30 ft. She got corrected anytime she went after or even looked to long at chicken. Eventually, I was able to take her off the leash while I was outside and she knew not to touch the chickens. Now, the chickens are nothing more than poop/snack factories to her. They have their own run and are never "intentionally" left alone with the dogs, but it gives me peace of mind knowing they don't want to kill chickens. I have a d'uccle that flies over the fence EVERY day (I have clipped her wings, she still does it) and spends most of it with the dogs, they don't give her a second look. good luck [​IMG]
     
  5. mc08daniel

    mc08daniel Out Of The Brooder

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    Quote:I have two dogs out of my 9 that will kill without thinking twice....Woody a 8lb mini doxie (who killed a full grown duck I had!) and Rock a 80lb doberman....he has never gotten lose but 2 or 3 free range has gone to far into his area....
     
  6. egglicious

    egglicious Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Well everyone made it through the night!!! We will see how today goes...

    My biggest problem right now is I am totally overwhelmed. I have an almost two year old that is a handful, two crazy rescue dogs and now eight chickens. I am seriously thinking of downsizing in the chicken department, but I confess I love them and i'm having a hard time with it! I know this will pass but right now I am overwhelmed.

    The dogs have changed loads since we got them and have had tons of training. But they were damaged pretty bad and it seems there is only so far you can get with a dog that has been neglected in early life. I am going to really try, though. Just overwhelmed with the thought right now...
     
  7. FourPawz

    FourPawz Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Quote:Your best bet at this point in time would be to dog-proof the chickens' coop/run. Then, work on the dogs as best you can and limit the dogs' access to the birds when you cannot train them.

    Note to others - getting a rescue dog is a great goal, but make sure, when you do, you explain to the rescue exactly what your situation is. Sometimes your best bet is a dog that has not had a horrible life. You can still help care for the really abused in other ways - donating money for their care, food, supplies (newspapers, clorox, toys) and perhaps transportation. It's ok if your family situation really needs a dog without too many issues. Many dogs end up homeless due to death of the owner, divorce, moving, etc. They're pretty well adjusted and due to age, perhaps they get overlooked by potential adopters.
     
  8. drumstick diva

    drumstick diva Still crazy after all these years. Premium Member

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    Out to pasture
    Sad tale that happens too often. Dogs have to be in a secure run and the same for chickens. If chickens are suicidal and fly into the yard with dogs, they need a run with roofing. Same for the dog. Dogs can be trained to some extent - not so with chickens. Hence the expression "bird brain."

    I've heard of people having success allowing dogs to get up to their MEANEST ROOSTER, who will peck the daylights out of them and hopefully flog them as well. Probably doesn't work for a huge rottweiler or dobe etc. But I think it would put the fear of chickens into smaller breeds.
     
  9. egglicious

    egglicious Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Quote:Your best bet at this point in time would be to dog-proof the chickens' coop/run. Then, work on the dogs as best you can and limit the dogs' access to the birds when you cannot train them.

    Note to others - getting a rescue dog is a great goal, but make sure, when you do, you explain to the rescue exactly what your situation is. Sometimes your best bet is a dog that has not had a horrible life. You can still help care for the really abused in other ways - donating money for their care, food, supplies (newspapers, clorox, toys) and perhaps transportation. It's ok if your family situation really needs a dog without too many issues. Many dogs end up homeless due to death of the owner, divorce, moving, etc. They're pretty well adjusted and due to age, perhaps they get overlooked by potential adopters.

    The rescue we got this particular dog from was very unscrupulous. We did ask for a very mellow dog with no/little issues. What we got was a dog that was nearly dead and had some major issues. By the time we got him home we realized he was emaciated and sick and was a biter. But we could not give up on him.

    As I said before he is transformed. He is a great, great dog.... that likes to terrorize chickens. We will do whatever it takes to train him and keep the chickens safe. When we got him, we didn't have a child and we didn't have chickens but he is family now.
     
    Last edited: Oct 8, 2011
  10. Kassaundra

    Kassaundra Sonic screwdrivers are cool!

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    Quote:[​IMG] At the very real risk of their eyesight!!!!!!!!! [​IMG] Not now not ever ........... [​IMG]
     

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