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Bumble foot? Help!

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by Violetsfeathers, Jul 31, 2015.

  1. breanna6627

    breanna6627 Out Of The Brooder

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    It looks like it's for fish,
     
  2. Violetsfeathers

    Violetsfeathers Chillin' With My Peeps

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    It is, I fights bacteria and infections, works on chickens.
     
  3. Violetsfeathers

    Violetsfeathers Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Today I soaked her feet in Epsom salt and then in that stuff. Then I blow dried her belly. Then I put triple antibiotic salve on one foot and tea tree oil on the other foot with gauze and wrapped them up with vet wrap
     
    Last edited: Aug 8, 2015
  4. Violetsfeathers

    Violetsfeathers Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I've been soaking her feet in Epsom salt and then the stuff, then I put triple antibiotic on it and wrap it up. We have antibiotics in her water also and it still isn't going away
     
  5. Pyxis

    Pyxis Dark Sider Premium Member

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    Well, that stuff you bought might not work like tricide neo. Their active ingredients might be different, or it might be meant to treat something else entirely. You could try ordering some actual tricide neo and trying that, but since it's been three weeks since this all started it could be that it's to the point that surgery is required, so I would just go ahead and do the surgery or take her to a vet that will do it. Aside from those options, if you can't do any of them, I'd put her down. Not trying to be harsh, but that would actually be what's best for her if you can't treat her, because eventually if this isn't treated it's going to go systemic and it will be a miserable death for her.
     
  6. mirandaleecon

    mirandaleecon Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Sometimes bumblefoot can be really stubborn. Several of my girls have had it. Some went away without any treatment, some I had to do one surgery and that fixed it, and one I am still battling right now. I have been working on curing this one hen for several months now and I think she is finally starting to improve.
    Here are my suggestions if you want to put in the effort:
    Address any nutritional needs; I have switched to fermented feed/grain and mine free range all the time
    Address any physical causes; Are the perches low enough? Are they smooth? Is the ground soft where they are jumping down? I actually just got carpet to cover their perches and the ramp they walk down. I saw somewhere that the ramps with pieces of wood across them are harsh on their feet...
    Treatment:
    Soak in Epsom salt bath and massage the feet to loosen the kernel
    Clean the area with iodine/betadine.
    If there is a thick scab, remove it and squeeze the foot (like a pimple) to try to get the kernel out. If nothing comes out, I have used a scalpel to make the hole just a bit bigger by cutting across like this: Φ You don't have to cut in the center where the scab was just on either side and only a tiny bit at a time, this is just to make it easier for the kernel to come out. It might bleed a bit, just keep paper towels or cotton balls handy. I have tried cutting entirely around the scab but I feel like this causes too much damage and unnecessary pain/bleeding. I prefer not to cut at all but sometimes the hole where the scab was is just too small for anything to come out.
    Once you get the kernel out, clean the area with vetericyn if you have it, cover with antibiotic ointment or nustock, place a piece of gauze over the wound and wrap with vet wrap. Change the wrap as often as you can. As long as the scabs aren't dark brown/black, they are healing. Check the foot each time you are changing the wrap for warmth and swelling. If it is warm, the infection is active and you need to do the surgery again. If it is not warm but the foot isn't entirely healed, keep wrapping it.
    I believe just keeping it clean and wrapped will help it heal on it's own but it takes time. I am going to experiment with using drawing salve and the little circle corn (like you get on your feet) pads to see if that will push the infection out a bit faster. I will let you know how this works...
     
    1 person likes this.
  7. Violetsfeathers

    Violetsfeathers Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Thanks! This really helps and encourages me to know that you are still fighting after a month, I've been trying to get it to go away for two weeks, I think it's getting better because the scab isn't brown, but there is pink around it and mom thinks that means the infection is still in there.
    What do you mean by warm? Chickens are warm, how warm do their feet have to be to tell?
     
  8. Violetsfeathers

    Violetsfeathers Chillin' With My Peeps

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    My chickens are my pets and Marshmallow is my favorite. She is not limping and putting her down would be the last thing I would do.
    I'd have her foot amputated before that.
     
  9. mirandaleecon

    mirandaleecon Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Oh if the scab isn't brown and there's pink around the edges, that means it's healing! The pink is new skin growing back. One of my hens that had bumblefoot months and months ago still has a little pink spot where the scab was. I would just keep changing the bandage and keep antibiotic ointment on there and it should heal the rest of the way in a couple weeks.
    They will be noticeably warmer if the infection is bad, almost hot to the touch. If you have another hen with no infection, you can touch her feet first and you will, without a doubt, be able to feel the difference. If both hens feet feel the same temperature-wise, then she should be alright. Just keep the bandage on until there is no scab left.
     
  10. Violetsfeathers

    Violetsfeathers Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Okay! I will try to post a pic today, soon.
     

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