Can water have Botulism in cold weather?

Discussion in 'Ducks' started by NathanZee, Dec 4, 2016.

  1. NathanZee

    NathanZee Chillin' With My Peeps Premium Member

    There are some low spots around that are filled with water around half the year, just small 1-2 feet deep ponds. I'd love to take the ducks swimming in these, but I'm afraid that there could be botulism in it. I'm in Minnesota so the temps right now are generally under 35F. Is it safe?
     
  2. junebuggena

    junebuggena Chicken Obsessed

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    Botulism is a bacteria found in spoiled foods. It is not usually a contaminant in water.
     
  3. lomine

    lomine Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Botulism also comes from rotting meat and vegetation. Not sure at what temperature it dies.
     
  4. NathanZee

    NathanZee Chillin' With My Peeps Premium Member

    Thanks! I wonder if there is anything you can put in water to remove it..
     
  5. chickens really

    chickens really Overrun With Chickens

    I worry also.....I was told by an old farmer that any place stagnant water lies can make many animals sick if drank....Dogs, horses, ducks, chickens.....Etc.............


    Cheers!
     
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  6. lomine

    lomine Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Found some interesting answers on this site about "what kills botulism/" Doesn't seem like there would be a safe way to kill the bacteria in standing water. (Also, I wouldn't take this sites word for it. You would defiantly want to do more research and find information from reputable sources.) http://scienceline.ucsb.edu/getkey.php?key=1307

    "bleach and sodium hydroxide (strong base) will kill the bacteria (but obviously you wouldnt want to pour bleach or sodium hydroxide on your food to decontaminate it)."

    "The toxin itself can be killed by boiling for 10 minutes."

    "Oxygen - although the thing about botulism that is poisonous is a waste product of the botulism bacterium, so it is still dangerous even after the bacterium is dead. Having something exposed to oxygen,however, will prevent botulism from infecting it in the first place."
     
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  7. MasterOfClucker

    MasterOfClucker Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Last edited: Dec 22, 2016
  8. NathanZee

    NathanZee Chillin' With My Peeps Premium Member

    Thank you guys! Does anyone know if there is something you can do to test a body of water for it?
     
  9. junebuggena

    junebuggena Chicken Obsessed

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    Botulism bacteria require very low oxygen conditions to grow, such as a vacuum sealed environment. Water is H2O, and is, by definition, rich in oxygen. Botulism spores are quite literally everywhere, but it's not until those spores are subjected to an anaerobic environment that they become toxic.
     
  10. MasterOfClucker

    MasterOfClucker Chillin' With My Peeps

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    The more PH in the water the more chance of there being a outbreak.
     

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