Chicken/Turkey wormer help

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by Chicken Egg 17, Apr 21, 2016.

  1. casportpony

    casportpony Team Tube Feeding Captain & Poop Inspector General Premium Member

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    EquiMAX - 0.16 ml per five pounds
    [​IMG]

    -Kathy
     
  2. Lady of McCamley

    Lady of McCamley Overrun With Chickens

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    Good to know Equimax has the praziquantel (along with ivermectin)...that you can find in the feed store.

    To OP: An important part of worming is cleaning up the litter and sources of re-infestation...otherwise...they'll be ingesting the worm cysts again to start the whole process over.

    Seasonal worming and clean litter go a long way in controlling parasites....and as much field rotation as you can accommodate in your area.

    LofMc
     
  3. casportpony

    casportpony Team Tube Feeding Captain & Poop Inspector General Premium Member

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  4. Chicken Egg 17

    Chicken Egg 17 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Isn't that for horses
     
  5. casportpony

    casportpony Team Tube Feeding Captain & Poop Inspector General Premium Member

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  6. Chicken Egg 17

    Chicken Egg 17 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Last edited: Apr 21, 2016
  7. Lady of McCamley

    Lady of McCamley Overrun With Chickens

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    It will be "off label" for chickens and poultry (turkeys, etc.).

    Most worming agents are not FDA approved for poultry simply because the commercial industry does not desire to pay for the testing on poultry since they cull regularly (short lives, high turn over). Younger birds have less worm overload. This is true for chickens and even truer for turkeys as their life span is very short...they are killed for table use before a high worm over load occurs.

    Most of the mentioned meds have been used in the past for poultry, and even studied in Ag programs, so a number of them have a track record for poultry use. I'll link such an example for fenbendazole for Turkey use:
    http://www.merck-animal-health-usa.com/binaries/Safeguard_Turkey_Bulletin_tcm96-86740.pdf

    If you are concerned for on label use only, that you can administer without a vet, then your only choice for chickens that lay eggs for human consumption is Hygromycin B found in Rooster Booster Triple Action Multi Wormer for poultry (it addresses 3 types of worms: round, cecal, and capillary). It is intended for continuous feed, but many small holders will feed for 2 to 4 weeks (depending upon infestation) 2 to 3 times a year.

    Turkeys are a bit different, and my regulations are not up on them as I haven't had turkeys for a few years (I keep hens that lay eggs for human consumption which I sell...hence I keep up on the regs for them...or try to).

    You can check what is on label for turkeys at the FDA here:
    http://www.accessdata.fda.gov/scripts/animaldrugsatfda/index.cfm?gb=2

    The wormers currently on list that I can see right now (and note this list is updated and changes periodically) appears to be:
    Pig Wormer with piperazine and Wazine, which will address only round worms.

    Most of the meds approved for turkeys are focused on bacterial infections and are antibiotics or drugs directed at the protozoa behind blackhead and coccidiosis for turkeys.

    However, many backyard owners are not concerned with FDA approval and treat from advice from experienced poultry keepers...such as our own BYC Castportpony, which means off label use of certain drugs.

    If you prefer, some vets will treat poultry and can certainly prescribe off label use for your turkey. However, there is the expense of the vet, and I've personally found many vets are not educated in poultry care and are not willing to treat poultry. If they are, they are typically educated for industry standard. My daughter was lucky to work as a Vet Tech for an avian vet when we discovered tape worm in one of my chickens (she'd take in samples periodically to practice her skills as she worked through the college Vet Tech program)....that is how I learned the difficulty in treating tape worm in chickens, on label and off label use, and most of my knowledge of worming in general.

    Always double check information before treating your animal, and if in doubt, ask a vet.

    LofMc
     
  8. Lady of McCamley

    Lady of McCamley Overrun With Chickens

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    ...and I should mention the safety concern is directed toward humans and the food chain not for the care and concern of the animal....as the animal is viewed by the industry as a commodity.

    So those who keep poultry have learned to become educated for self care.

    So Kathy is correct, it is "safe" for the bird...poultry keeping experience and a number of Ag studies have been done to see what works...but the studies are limited for expense reasons stated as FDA approval is expensive and time consuming as Congress, and many in the general public, are concerned about the safety of antibiotics and other meds in eggs and meat consumed by humans.

    ...that's the idea behind "safety" and "on label" and "off label" use....as to FDA approval.

    EDITED TO ADD: Obviously vet concern is for the animal safety itself.

    LofMc
     
    Last edited: Apr 21, 2016
  9. Chicken Egg 17

    Chicken Egg 17 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Ok I will get back to ur posts in the morning I just finished up school work as I have been trying to finish on time here for the end of the year coming up here next month on the 20th thanks
     
  10. Lady of McCamley

    Lady of McCamley Overrun With Chickens

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    ...that's fine...and may have been more than you may have cared to know...but explains why horse medicine is recommended for poultry.

    LofMc
     

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