Cocci vs. coccidia

ChickenCanoe

Enabler
Premium Feather Member
10 Years
Nov 23, 2010
33,285
28,244
1,077
St. Louis, MO
People with many different species of animals (chickens, turkeys, goats, dogs, cats, etc.) have problems with one or more species of the protozoa coccidia.
Cocci is really a misnomer when referring to the protozoa that causes intestinal problems but I see it written here all the time. Cocci is any spherical microorganism, usually a bacterium.
Coccidia which causes coccidiosis is a protozoa - not bacteria.
I'm pretty sure when people use the term cocci, they really mean coccidia.
Sorry to be such a stickler but terminology matters.
.
 
Last edited:

DobieLover

Easily distracted by chickens
Premium Feather Member
Jul 23, 2018
33,362
271,585
1,642
NY Southern Tier
My Coop
My Coop
People with many different species of animals have problems with one or more species of the protozoa coccidia.
Cocci is really a misnomer but I see it written here all the time. Cocci is any spherical microorganism, usually a bacterium.
Coccidia which causes coccidiosis is a protozoa - not bacteria.
I'm pretty sure when people use the term cocci, they really mean coccidia.
Sorry to be such a stickler but terminology matters.
.
Honestly, that's always bugged me too.
 

Aristocat123

Songster
May 22, 2019
326
571
187
Florida
People with many different species of animals have problems with one or more species of the protozoa coccidia.
Cocci is really a misnomer but I see it written here all the time. Cocci is any spherical microorganism, usually a bacterium.
Coccidia which causes coccidiosis is a protozoa - not bacteria.
I'm pretty sure when people use the term cocci, they really mean coccidia.
Sorry to be such a stickler but terminology matters.
.
Thank you for clarifying that. If chicks get it and they are treated for it how long before they could be integrated with other chicks from a different flock? Should they even be brought in?
 

ChickenCanoe

Enabler
Premium Feather Member
10 Years
Nov 23, 2010
33,285
28,244
1,077
St. Louis, MO
The chickens and other animals can develop resistance if exposed slowly to the species of coccidia on the property. Unlike viral or bacterial infections, they only spread when the animal excretes sporulated oocysts. If the bedding is moist, the population will explode.
Keeping bedding bone dry goes a long way to preventing an outbreak.
If they have been treated and are no longer excreting the protozoa, they can easily be combined with other birds.

I'm happy to know I'm not the only grammar/spelling/terminology Nazi here.
 

townchicks

Free Ranging
Dec 1, 2016
1,999
6,517
676
Contra Costa county, Ca.
Thank you for clarifying that. If chicks get it and they are treated for it how long before they could be integrated with other chicks from a different flock? Should they even be brought in?
Coccidia are pretty much everywhere. The treatment consists, basically, of suppressing the B vitamins in the chicks gut, that the coccidia live on, thus killing most of them off, until the chick has a chance to develop resistance to them. So when they have finished treatment, if stool is normal and they act well, they can be introduced to any other chickens. Do know, however, that there are a number of different species of coccidia, and treated chicks become resistant to the species they have been exposed to. So, they could be exposed to a new strain, from the other chickens, and vice versa.
 

Aristocat123

Songster
May 22, 2019
326
571
187
Florida
Coccidia are pretty much everywhere. The treatment consists, basically, of suppressing the B vitamins in the chicks gut, that the coccidia live on, thus killing most of them off, until the chick has a chance to develop resistance to them. So when they have finished treatment, if stool is normal and they act well, they can be introduced to any other chickens. Do know, however, that there are a number of different species of coccidia, and treated chicks become resistant to the species they have been exposed to. So, they could be exposed to a new strain, from the other chickens, and vice versa.
I’m supposed to purchase a couple of chicks from a breeder which are currently being treated for coccidia and I don’t want to expose my flock to it. Not sure what to do
 

Aristocat123

Songster
May 22, 2019
326
571
187
Florida
The chickens and other animals can develop resistance if exposed slowly to the species of coccidia on the property. Unlike viral or bacterial infections, they only spread when the animal excretes sporulated oocysts. If the bedding is moist, the population will explode.
Keeping bedding bone dry goes a long way to preventing an outbreak.
If they have been treated and are no longer excreting the protozoa, they can easily be combined with other birds.

I'm happy to know I'm not the only grammar/spelling/terminology Nazi here.
The chickens and other animals can develop resistance if exposed slowly to the species of coccidia on the property. Unlike viral or bacterial infections, they only spread when the animal excretes sporulated oocysts. If the bedding is moist, the population will explode.
Keeping bedding bone dry goes a long way to preventing an outbreak.
If they have been treated and are no longer excreting the protozoa, they can easily be combined with other birds.

I'm happy to know I'm not the only grammar/spelling/terminology Nazi here.
Haha no. I read and edit my posts before I post.
It’s not my flock that has it. These are chicks from a breeder that are being treated for it.
 

townchicks

Free Ranging
Dec 1, 2016
1,999
6,517
676
Contra Costa county, Ca.
I’m supposed to purchase a couple of chicks from a breeder which are currently being treated for coccidia and I don’t want to expose my flock to it. Not sure what to do
I wouldn't worry about it too much, just make sure that the breeder has finished the full treatment and then keep an eye on them, and your current chickens. If they are adults, they shouldn't have too much risk.
 

MANNA-PRO

New posts New threads Active threads

Top Bottom