"Crowing" hens? Weird sinuses?

KranK

Chirping
Jul 13, 2020
292
168
83
Poland
Omg today my grandpa found her lying under the roost, like she was dying and brought her to a rabbit hutch to die calmly but later on he she got up and started going crazy to go out. He let her out and shes acting normal. What's going on with her
 

KranK

Chirping
Jul 13, 2020
292
168
83
Poland
The second one has got same nasal discharge and does weird sounds like she's trying to cough/sneeze? Similiar symptoms. I noticed it today cuz as i was sick i couldn't go to chickens and grandpa doesn't notice such things :/ No foam in eyes as i saw.
 

Eggcessive

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Saline or a drop of hydrogen peroxide on the clogged nostril can soften the secretions within a few minutes to make it easier to remove crusts or whatever is clogging.
 

KranK

Chirping
Jul 13, 2020
292
168
83
Poland
Saline or a drop of hydrogen peroxide on the clogged nostril can soften the secretions within a few minutes to make it easier to remove crusts or whatever is clogging.
i found it easier to fold a piece of paper towel and just take out the crust with it. Works perfectly and after it the chicken has the cleanest nostrils ever (really lol). The problem is i'm afraid that my flock will die beacause of this disease-thingy :( Is there any solution?
 

Eggcessive

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Some chickens can die from a chronic respiratory disease, but most do not. All chickens in the flock should be considered to be carriers, and no birds should be given away or sold. You may see an outbreak during a time of stress, such as during molting or very cold weather. Some deal with sick birds by culling them, while some chose to use antibiotics and temporary separation. It all depends on the disease, whether it is caused by a virus or bacteria. Foam in an eye and clogged nostrils could be mycoplasma (MG.) Diseases can be diagnosed with testing or a necropsy and cultures. Hens with respiratory diseases may never lay eggs normally or thrive, but many hens in the flock may never suffer symptoms. If I could not get antibiotics to treat a sick bird, I would probably separate, try to nurse the chicken, and cull if it seems to serious.
 

KranK

Chirping
Jul 13, 2020
292
168
83
Poland
Some chickens can die from a chronic respiratory disease, but most do not. All chickens in the flock should be considered to be carriers, and no birds should be given away or sold. You may see an outbreak during a time of stress, such as during molting or very cold weather. Some deal with sick birds by culling them, while some chose to use antibiotics and temporary separation. It all depends on the disease, whether it is caused by a virus or bacteria. Foam in an eye and clogged nostrils could be mycoplasma (MG.) Diseases can be diagnosed with testing or a necropsy and cultures. Hens with respiratory diseases may never lay eggs normally or thrive, but many hens in the flock may never suffer symptoms. If I could not get antibiotics to treat a sick bird, I would probably separate, try to nurse the chicken, and cull if it seems to serious.
The ones from before that the thread was orginally about are laying normally, i even saw them recently sitting on nests and then there was an egg. The new one lays too i think. I don't want to cull them, especially when the only symptoms are crust on nostrils and coughing (eventually a bit of foam on eyes) :/ it's getting colder recently and rains more.
 

Eggcessive

Enabler
Premium Feather Member
Apr 3, 2011
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Many people deal with a respiratory disease in the same way, but just close their flocks. There is nothing wrong with that. Hopefully, your birds will eventually get better.
 

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