Difference between Heritage and Standard

Discussion in 'General breed discussions & FAQ' started by ajlynco, Oct 14, 2011.

  1. ajlynco

    ajlynco Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I'd like to start raising 6 RIR's and 6 BR's for eggs and meat. After reading BYC for a while I started thinking about the variances within the breeds. My priority at this time is egg production. In another year or so I'd like to increase my flock using my own eggs. Eventually my flock will be providing both eggs and meat. Considering my goals for the flock, should I buy Standard, Heritage, or Production day-olds? I'm beginning to like the idea of raising purebred lines but egg production and later, freezer meat is most important in the beginning. Can anyone explain the difference in the 3 options and which would fit my needs the best? [​IMG] [​IMG]
     
  2. saladin

    saladin Chillin' With My Peeps

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    You can find birds from any of those three options that will fit the bill.
     
  3. galanie

    galanie Treat Dispenser No More

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    If your priority is eggs, then production will do fine and be the easiest to obtain. Saladin is right, any will fill the bill for your stated goals. Production or hatchery birds won't be as much for meat since they've been bred with egg production in mind only.
     
  4. ajlynco

    ajlynco Chillin' With My Peeps

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    What IS the difference between Standard and Heritage chickens? Is there a significant difference between Standard and Heritage in regards to meat production?
     
  5. saladin

    saladin Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Quote:Standard bred chickens are breeds of chickens included in the APA's Standard of Perfection.

    Heritage chickens are traditional breeds of chickens many of which are in the Standard of Perfection. Actually, the word 'heritage' is way, way over-rated. For example, you'll hear folks refer to Delawares as a Heritage Breed: what a joke. Delawares are great chickens, but they were created in 1940! Heritage is defined by different folks in different ways.

    When I think of the word 'heritage' I think of pioneers and farm families. I also think of Persian, Arabian, Indian and Phoenican cockfighting merchants.
     
  6. galanie

    galanie Treat Dispenser No More

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    As a practical matter, I don't think there is a difference between Standard and Heritage. Both are APA standard (if one exists for that breed) rather than hatchery quality. If they are a dual purpose breed, then the Standard or Heritage (like I said, pretty much the same thing) have been bred with both meat and eggs in mind, whereas hatcheries breed for eggs only. As a result, for example, Standard (heritage) Orpington hens are 6-8 lbs and lay great, while hatchery orps are 4 lbs and lay a little better.
     
  7. A.T. Hagan

    A.T. Hagan Don't Panic

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    There are birds that can meet the APAs cosmetic Standards of Perfection.

    There are birds that have been selected over time to be good layers.

    There are birds that have not been selected for any purpose at all other than to look more or less like the breed/variety they are supposed to be and may or may not be able to win a beauty contest or pay for their feed in the eggs/meat they produce.

    Whether you can find any of those birds depends on your ability to find a breeder that is producing them. Show bred birds will usually look pretty and if of an appropriate breed will grow quite large over time. Whether they'll lay well or grow very quickly you'll have to determine with the person that bred them. Most will not, but there may be some that you can find.

    Birds from the big hatcheries if we're talking about one of the historical breeds will typically be fair layers and will grow reasonably quickly but generally will not grow as large as a show bred bird for those breeds that are supposed to.

    If their practical qualities are more important to you than their cosmetic qualities then you would be better off to look at commercial birds. These will not be pure bred since the commercial industry long ago went over to cross breeding to achieve the hybrid vigor that a knowledgeable cross can bring. Even the commercial White Leghorn is usually a strain hybrid within the breed as I understand it. You can, of course, breed these birds but in the case of sex-links you'll lose the ability to determine male from female at hatch and you'll lose somewhat of their production ability, but you will still generally have an excellent production bird that will likely still outlay most pure-bred historical breeds. One possible exception here is that Decorah Hatchery claims to have Barred Rocks that will lay a flock average of 250 eggs per bird in their pullet year. I haven't yet tried those birds myself so I can't verify or refute that claim.

    This is all talking about laying stock. The modern day Cornish Cross meat birds are a complex hybrid that are difficult to keep alive long enough to reach breeding age. The folks who have managed generally report that they lay fairly well and their offspring still reach a good size fairly fast if not with the speed and efficiency of their cross-bred parents.

    Bottom line is first decide what qualities are most important to you then go from there. There are no birds that can do it all.
     
  8. kathyinmo

    kathyinmo Nothing In Moderation

    Quote:Standard bred chickens are breeds of chickens included in the APA's Standard of Perfection.

    Heritage chickens are traditional breeds of chickens many of which are in the Standard of Perfection. Actually, the word 'heritage' is way, way over-rated. For example, you'll hear folks refer to Delawares as a Heritage Breed: what a joke. Delawares are great chickens, but they were created in 1940! Heritage is defined by different folks in different ways.

    When I think of the word 'heritage' I think of pioneers and farm families. I also think of Persian, Arabian, Indian and Phoenican cockfighting merchants.

    ALBC has some pretty impressive people who endorse their definition. They also have a list of the breeds they consider to be heritage. You may not agree, but the Delaware breed is on that list. The APA has yet to step forward with a definition or opinion, as far as I know. Until then, this is all we have to go by. That said, there will always be some who disagree, no matter what the list says or who makes the list. That's to be expected.

    http://www.albc-usa.org/heritagechicken/definition.html

    Chickens have been a part of the American diet since the arrival of the Spanish explorers. Since that time, different breeds have been developed to provide meat, eggs, and pleasure.

    The American Poultry Association began defining breeds in 1873 and publishing the definitions in the Standard of Perfection. These Standard breeds were well adapted to outdoor production in various climatic regions. They were hearty, long-lived, and reproductively vital birds that provided an important source of protein to the growing population of the country until the mid-20th century. With the industrialization of chickens many breeds were sidelined in preference for a few rapidly growing hybrids. The American Livestock Breeds Conservancy now lists over three-dozen breeds of chickens in danger of extinction. Extinction of a breed would mean the irrevocable loss of the genetic resources and options it embodies.

    Therefore, to draw attention to these endangered breeds, to support their long-term conservation, to support efforts to recover these breeds to historic levels of productivity, and to re-introduce these culinary and cultural treasures to the marketplace, the American Livestock Breeds Conservancy is defining Heritage Chicken. Chickens must meet all of the following criteria to be marketed as Heritage.

    Definition:

    Heritage Chicken must adhere to all the following:

    1. APA Standard Breed. Heritage Chicken must be from parent and grandparent stock of breeds recognized by the American Poultry Association (APA) prior to the mid-20th century; whose genetic line can be traced back multiple generations; and with traits that meet the APA Standard of Perfection guidelines for the breed. Heritage Chicken must be produced and sired by an APA Standard breed. Heritage eggs must be laid by an APA Standard breed.
    2. Naturally mating. Heritage Chicken must be reproduced and genetically maintained through natural mating. Chickens marketed as Heritage must be the result of naturally mating pairs of both grandparent and parent stock.
    3. Long, productive outdoor lifespan. Heritage Chicken must have the genetic ability to live a long, vigorous life and thrive in the rigors of pasture-based, outdoor production systems. Breeding hens should be productive for 5-7 years and roosters for 3-5 years.
    4. Slow growth rate. Heritage Chicken must have a moderate to slow rate of growth, reaching appropriate market weight for the breed in no less than 16 weeks. This gives the chicken time to develop strong skeletal structure and healthy organs prior to building muscle mass.

    Chickens marketed as Heritage must include the variety and breed name on the label.

    Terms like “heirloom,” “antique,” “old-fashioned,” and “old timey” imply Heritage and are understood to be synonymous with the definition provided here.

    Abbreviated Definition: A Heritage Egg can only be produced by an American Poultry Association Standard breed. A Heritage Chicken is hatched from a heritage egg sired by an American Poultry Association Standard breed established prior to the mid-20th century, is slow growing, naturally mated with a long productive outdoor life.

    The American Livestock Breeds Conservancy has over 30 years of experience, knowledge, and understanding of endangered breeds, genetic conservation, and breeder networks.

    Endorsed by the following individuals:
    Frank Reese, Reese Turkeys, Good Shepherd Turkey Ranch, Standard Bred Poultry Institute, and American Poultry Association;
    Marjorie Bender, Research & Technical Program Director, American Livestock Breeds Conservancy
    D. Phillip Sponenberg, DVM, PhD., Technical Advisor, American Livestock Breeds Conservancy, and Professor, Veterinary Pathology and Genetics, Virginia Tech;
    Don Bixby, DVM. Independent Consultant, former Executive Director for the American Livestock Breeds Conservancy;
    R. Scott Beyer, PhD, Associate Professor, Poultry Nutrition Management, Kansas State University,
    Danny Williamson, Windmill Farm, Good Shepherd Turkey Ranch, and American Poultry Association;
    Anne Fanatico, PhD, Research Associate, Center for Excellence for Poultry Science, University of Arkansas;
    Kenneth E. Anderson, Professor, Poultry Extension Specialist, North Carolina State University.

    ALBC Conservation Priority Heritage Chicken Breeds
    CHICKENS
    CRITICAL
    Campine
    Chantecler
    Crevecoeur
    Holland
    Modern Game
    Nankin
    Redcap
    Russian Orloff
    Spanish
    Sultan
    Sumatra
    Yokohama

    THREATENED
    Andalusian
    Buckeye
    Buttercup
    Cubalaya
    Delaware
    Dorking
    Faverolles
    Java
    Lakenvelder
    Langshan
    Malay
    Phoenix

    WATCH
    Ancona
    Aseel
    Brahma
    Catalana
    Cochin
    Cornish
    Dominique
    Hamburg
    Houdan
    Jersey Giant
    La Fleche
    Minorca
    New Hampshire
    Old English Game
    Polish
    Rhode Island White
    Sebright
    Shamo

    RECOVERING
    Australorp
    Leghorn- Non-industrial
    Orpington
    Plymouth Rock
    Rhode Island Red - Non industrial
    Sussex
    Wyandotte

    STUDY
    Araucana1
    Iowa Blue
    Lamona
    Manx Rumpy (aka Persian Rumpless)
    Naked Neck (aka Turken)​
     
    Last edited: Oct 14, 2011
  9. Chris09

    Chris09 Circle (M) Ranch

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    kathyinmo,
    The list of breeds that you posted of "ALBC Conservation Priority Heritage Chicken Breeds" is incorrect, The list of breeds that you posted are from the ALBC Conservation Priority List and has nothing to do with "Heritage Breeds"

    According to the ALBC a "Heritage Breed" is one that is a APA Standard Breed.
    The Russian Orloff, Iowa Blue, Manx Rumpy (aka Persian Rumpless) and Nankin are not the APA SoP Standard.

    Chris

    .
     
    Last edited: Oct 14, 2011
  10. kathyinmo

    kathyinmo Nothing In Moderation

    Quote:What do you mean it has nothing to do with heritage breeds? It is their PRIORITY Conservation list of heritage breeds, as it says on the page the list is on.... "ALBC Conservation Priority Heritage Chicken Breeds."
    http://www.albc-usa.org/heritagechicken/cpl_chickenbreeds.html.

    My point being, Delawares are on their list of heritage breeds.
     

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