Do Guineas eat Gypsy Moths?

Amer

Advocate of Shiloh
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I’ve heard of guineas and their legendary bug-eating abilities.
That was part of the reason that I decided to get some keets this year.
But chickens eat bugs too. There’s just one thing I can never seem to get them to eat.
Those horrible caterpillars, gypsy moths in particular.
Do guineas eat gypsy moths?
(Here are the babies.)
D3C82B55-B244-48F8-90E0-33D3CBFF1E17.jpeg
 
I’ve heard of guineas and their legendary bug-eating abilities.
That was part of the reason that I decided to get some keets this year.
But chickens eat bugs too. There’s just one thing I can never seem to get them to eat.
Those horrible caterpillars, gypsy moths in particular.
Do guineas eat gypsy moths?
(Here are the babies.)
View attachment 1876535
My guineas eagerly pounce on the adult seasonal millers when they are here. Woolly worm caterpillars wander around in their pen without being eaten.

I have no doubt they will eat the adult gypsy moths but it would not surprise me if they don't care for the caterpillars.

Guineas seem to form their likes and dislikes for different foods at a very early age and tend to not be very adventurous in trying new foods when they are adults. You could try putting a few caterpillars in the brooder with them when they are young keets.
 
My guineas eagerly pounce on the adult seasonal millers when they are here. Woolly worm caterpillars wander around in their pen without being eaten.

I have no doubt they will eat the adult gypsy moths but it would not surprise me if they don't care for the caterpillars.

Guineas seem to form their likes and dislikes for different foods at a very early age and tend to not be very adventurous in trying new foods when they are adults. You could try putting a few caterpillars in the brooder with them when they are young keets.
Thank you!
 
Over here often the hairy caterpillars (or woolly) have hairs that are extremely irritating, which is part of their defence mechanism and it generally works so birds and other insect eaters leave them alone. Once the caterpillars become adult their life span is generally shorter and confined to breading the next generation so defence is of lesser importance to finding a mate, so I'm not surprised that guineas leave woolly caterpillars alone.
 

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