Exterior Humidity Effect

Discussion in 'Incubating & Hatching Eggs' started by enggass, Jan 8, 2011.

  1. enggass

    enggass Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Mar 8, 2010
    Mid-Coast Maine
    Hey all,
    Setting up my Brinsea 20 Eco and testing to get the temps/humidity straight and such. Is it normal to have trouble getting the Humidity up when there are no eggs in the bator?
    Got the temp right on.
    For humidity, I have one trough filled with water and air vent slider at half way point.
    If there were eggs in there, would it effect the humidity and is this something I will not be able to really nail down until my eggs have been set for 24hrs or so?
     
    Last edited: Jan 8, 2011
  2. Baralak

    Baralak Chillin' With My Peeps

    I usually fill both regardless... Remember on the manuals that come with those things... THROW them AWAY..lol To get higher humidity, I put a wash cloth under the tray at lockdown. I push the washcloth's edges into the tanks.
     
  3. GreenGoddess

    GreenGoddess Chillin' With My Peeps

    Jun 6, 2009
    St Pauls, NC
    Honestly, I got a hova bator with fan and when I filled one slot, the humidity went over 60... I took all the water out, folded a paper towel so that it was 1/4 size and then put it in the trough and soaked it with water.. My humidity is staying right around 40 that way.. When i need more humidity at lockdown, I will go ahead and just fill that one section and the humidity SHOULD be right where it should be....

    Goddess [​IMG]
     
  4. enggass

    enggass Chillin' With My Peeps

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    How much of an effect does the exterior humidity have? I am in my basement in the winter and the current air Humidity is around 35%. This will rise come spring to 50-60%... due to melting and warming and such...
     
  5. iamcuriositycat

    iamcuriositycat Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Jul 30, 2009
    Charlotte, NC
    Exterior humidity has a HUGE effect. If it's higher, you'll have an easier time keeping humidity up inside the incubator. If it's lower, the opposite is true.

    Unfortunately, it also has an effect on what the humidity *should* be inside the incubator. In more humid climates (generally speaking), you need a lower humidity inside the incubator, and in drier climates, a higher humidity. This has to do with the way that dry air coming into the incubator picks up moisture (i.e., it takes more out of the eggs, so you need more sources of humidity to prevent the eggs from being depleted). It's unfortunate because in climates where it's hard to keep the humidity up is where it's also most important.

    Some people run a humidifier in the room with the incubator to try and compensate and make it easier to keep up humidity inside the incubator.

    Just FYI, come spring you will probably have best success running at a lower humidity than the usual recommendations. This tends to be true in the southeastern U.S. because the eggs need to lose a certain amount of moisture in order to hatch properly (so the air cell is large enough for the bird's beak/bill and contains enough air), and at higher humidities they won't lose as much moisture, especially if the air coming into the incubator is already humid.

    For now, following standard recommendations will probably be just fine. Good luck!
     
  6. gofasterstripe

    gofasterstripe Chillin' With My Peeps

    I got an Octo Eco for Christmas. I couldnt get my humidity up, so when I put my eggs in I put in a small face cloth, filled 1 thing with water and put the eggs in..Humidity solved within 10 mins. When I turn I spray the eggs and pour a little bit of water over the face cloth and close the lid. Ive had no probs with it at all. It depends what method workd for you
     
  7. enggass

    enggass Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Quote:Great info. Thank you...
     

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