Getting a new black scovy drake

Quacking Pigeon

Crowing
Mar 12, 2018
1,214
2,293
321
NSW, Australia
My Coop
My Coop
Hi guys, I’m just wondering if I should get this drake for breeding and showing or if i should just hold off for a while and wait till there’s an auction.
3044B6A0-5451-426B-8291-BEE6246C09DE.jpeg
His parents are black and white... I’m a bit confused how they produced a black but that’s genetics. The drake overtime will most likely form a white breast. What’s your opinion?
 

Quacking Pigeon

Crowing
Mar 12, 2018
1,214
2,293
321
NSW, Australia
My Coop
My Coop
It’s very hard to find pure black drakes in Australia. I did have one who had a black breast.
A082E6D5-658C-44A6-BD5F-5556D9A3378E.jpeg
But he had a respiratory infection and ended up dying after a few days. Also should I be worried about the girls he was with?
 

sylviethecochin

Free Ranging
Jun 14, 2017
5,499
11,305
701
Central PA
Theoretically, I think you could use a good black pied drake to get black ducklings--in goats and cattle and rabbits, the spot/pied gene is a pattern gene, but I'm pretty sure that in muscovies, it's a single white gene that causes loss of pigment. Two copies means that the bird is completely white, one copy means that the bird has patches of pigment (or patches of white) and no copies mean that you get a solid colored bird. Of course, it would be a bit of a gamble over whether you got a good black pattern without being able to see the entire pattern...

@learycow? I don't show muscovies, and it looks like you do, so would this work? Or am I leaving out another factor completely?
 

learycow

Crowing
10 Years
Apr 1, 2011
3,075
1,225
356
Southern Maine
Theoretically, I think you could use a good black pied drake to get black ducklings--in goats and cattle and rabbits, the spot/pied gene is a pattern gene, but I'm pretty sure that in muscovies, it's a single white gene that causes loss of pigment. Two copies means that the bird is completely white, one copy means that the bird has patches of pigment (or patches of white) and no copies mean that you get a solid colored bird. Of course, it would be a bit of a gamble over whether you got a good black pattern without being able to see the entire pattern...

@learycow? I don't show muscovies, and it looks like you do, so would this work? Or am I leaving out another factor completely?

I show only for fun (and don't breed solids!) but pied can be used to breed solids. It just takes a few generations of breeding to get solids. And keep in mind that those will still carry the pied gene recessively so it can pop up generations later.

I wouldn't suggest using an white head gened birds though as that takes MUCH longer to breed out of a flock.

But @Quacking Pigeon is right, go for conformation first as thats harder to breed and correct. Pattern is much easier to work on
 

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