Handling 'wild' but tame peahen

MountainUp1

In the Brooder
Oct 31, 2020
4
19
18
We have flock of twenty-some chickens. About five months ago, a lone peahen arrived from 'nowhere' and began free ranging with our chickens. She's never left us. She is so beautiful. We named her Lucy.

We'll be hatching some new peahens from purchased fertile eggs next spring, and building a house for them. A friend might also give us a peacock, but he said we need to keep it sheltered/contained for at least 30 to 60 days so it knows this is home, then we can let it free range. We want to find her some company other than chickens.

Lucy is pretty tame, will eat individual peanut kernels from between our fingers, will come when we whistle (and feed) her, and is always somewhere nearby. I've read there are a few things like worming meds or assisted grooming that would require the 'capture' and handling of Lucy.

How can we train her to be comfortable being touched? Is it okay if I just grab her legs, like I would a chicken, and hold her still? Should I just start doing that to her a few times a week, then more often, until she allows us to just pick her up? Maybe only feed her when we have her in our hands? Is there anything else we can 'train' Lucy to do?

The only thing so far is I started to sneak little 'back pets' while feeding her, but she moves away pretty quick.

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KsKingBee

Crowing
Sep 29, 2013
6,400
3,641
452
The Scenic Flint Hills of Kansas
Weigh the risk of traumatizing her over just being friendly and eating from your hand. They are like kids and every one of them is different. She might take to you but I doubt she will and may even decide to not get within arm's length again. After you get your new cock you sill have opportunities to imprint babies. This big SP cock does not like to be touched and will move away when I try to touch him although I can pet him when he sits on my arm. It is not natural for peas to like being pet and very few will allow it. There is also a danger when imprinting birds, cocks can turn aggressive during the breeding season if they have no fear of you.
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Entreparadis

Chirping
Aug 8, 2019
56
79
63
We have flock of twenty-some chickens. About five months ago, a lone peahen arrived from 'nowhere' and began free ranging with our chickens. She's never left us. She is so beautiful. We named her Lucy.

We'll be hatching some new peahens from purchased fertile eggs next spring, and building a house for them. A friend might also give us a peacock, but he said we need to keep it sheltered/contained for at least 30 to 60 days so it knows this is home, then we can let it free range. We want to find her some company other than chickens.

Lucy is pretty tame, will eat individual peanut kernels from between our fingers, will come when we whistle (and feed) her, and is always somewhere nearby. I've read there are a few things like worming meds or assisted grooming that would require the 'capture' and handling of Lucy.

How can we train her to be comfortable being touched? Is it okay if I just grab her legs, like I would a chicken, and hold her still? Should I just start doing that to her a few times a week, then more often, until she allows us to just pick her up? Maybe only feed her when we have her in our hands? Is there anything else we can 'train' Lucy to do?

The only thing so far is I started to sneak little 'back pets' while feeding her, but she moves away pretty quick.

View attachment 2394122
Peafowl do not like to be touched unless they are hand raised and can have health problems if you stress them out by touching or cornering them. However, if you have gotten attached to her, I would suggest putting her in a large enclosure to protect her from predators and to keep her around until you get more. If she disappears play some peacock calls (not honking) on a speaker to figure out where she is and hopefully lure her back. Good luck!
 

MountainUp1

In the Brooder
Oct 31, 2020
4
19
18
if you have gotten attached to her, I would suggest putting her in a large enclosure to protect her from predators
I'm excited to report yes, we got a peacock! A friend gave us a 2-year-old peacock. We recently added a 80 sq ft pen, about 7' tall, and have this new peacock in it. Every day for the past week, we open the door and lure the 'wild' peahen inside with the new peacock. Then I let her out in the evening, but keep the new peacock in the pen for now.

Is that size pen big enough for both the peahen and peacock together? Should we leave them both in there for a few weeks, until they know it's 'home', then start to free range them along with our flock of chickens?
 

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