Help....

Discussion in 'Raising Baby Chicks' started by ButtersMama, Mar 3, 2011.

  1. ButtersMama

    ButtersMama Chirping

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    Well I just read some scary stories about the red lights. My brooder is in my home and I no longer feel comfortable (after just 1-1/2 days) using the red 250 Watt light in the brooding lamp. I am going to put the chicks under a lamp that hangs over the kitchen table which uses a white household 100W and make a decision tomorrow on what to use. What is the purpose of the RED light? I read its to keep chicks from pecking eachothers eyes out?? Please advise....anyone???
     
  2. CowgirlPenny

    CowgirlPenny Songster

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    I think it helps them sleep easier, and yes its supposed to reduce pecking. I use a white 125 bulb and have very happy week old chicks! Good luck
     
  3. hinkjc

    hinkjc Crowing

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    The red light is supposed to keep them calmer and helps to prevent picking. A lot of people do not use them and the chicks are fine. I would not use a 250 watt bulb in the house. Definitely use the 100 watt and see how they respond to it. If they seem fidgety, go to a hardware store and get a red 75 or 100 watt bulb. We get ours at a True Value or Ace.
     
  4. ButtersMama

    ButtersMama Chirping

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    Wow! You guys are great...first answer in 1 minute and second in two minutes!
    I appreciate your input. I'm going to get a red one from the hardware store. My house is set at 67-70 deg throughout the day so I think they will be fine.
     
  5. CoffeeCow

    CoffeeCow Songster

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    When I had my brooder (50 gallon tote) in the house, I used red lightbulbs, but not 250w... thats way too hot. I started with a 100W and ended with a 75w . Keep an eye on that thermometer, don't let it get too hot in there.

    The white lights seem to make it hard for my chickens to sleep, but red do not bother their sleep habits. I keep a 75w (red) lamp over their roost in the coop. I only turn it on when its below 30 outside... I had an issue with one of my Delawares getting a bit of frostbite on her comb.

    Regardless of the color, 250w is a bit high for me. that much heat can be dangerous.
     
  6. CoffeeCow

    CoffeeCow Songster

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    Quote:Try the pet store, In the reptile section, they have every watt red bulb you could ever need. They even have ceramic heaters that screw in like a bulb, but give off no light (they're expensive though)
     
  7. darkmatter

    darkmatter Songster

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    I've been incubating and brooding chicks/keets for many years. I've always just used a 75 to 100 watt white bulb in a metal reflector cone suspended over the brooder. At first I used recycled cardboard boxes for a brooder, now I have a large rubbermaid round stocktank which has been working very well for me.
     
  8. HEChicken

    HEChicken Crowing

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    My first few batches I used a white light and they were fine, but while my current batch was incubating, I decided it was time to invest in a red light. I was shocked to find the only one they had was 250W. However I plugged it into a rheostat and it worked fine. I will say that this batch of chicks is the calmest and friendliest I have ever brooded, but have no idea if that is because the red light allowed them to rest more easily or some other factor. They are now a month old and I turned the light off for good last weekend (after turning it down every few days from hatch until then).
     
  9. ButtersMama

    ButtersMama Chirping

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    ughh....now they are pecking at eachother [​IMG] ....alot. I hope I don't wake up to blood. I'll get a red light tomorrow, but much less wattage.
    Thanks again all!
     

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