Horse biting other horse

QChickieMama

Songster
8 Years
Oct 1, 2011
356
19
176
We're boarding 2 horses, quarter-mix somethings, a gelding and a mare. We don't know too much about horses, and the owners hardly EVER come by.

Here's what's happening: the gelding is 7yo and spunky and a bully. He follows the mare, won't let her eat grain or hay unless we separate them, etc. He just bosses her all day long. They're in a huge pasture, so it's not like he doesn't have enough grass to be happy. Tonight I saw him biting her. She's standing there eating grass and he bites her for no reason. She hollers at him pathetically but he keeps at it. She's had low weight issues, so when we do supplement their feed, we have to feed them separately or she won't get her share.

Is there anything I can do about this behavior of his? If I get another water trough, I could put each in a separate pasture, but don't horses like companions, even if they're mean?
 

theoldchick

The Chicken Whisperer
Premium Feather Member
10 Years
May 11, 2010
30,157
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In this case, separate the mare from the gelding, but allow them to see each other. He's simply trying to be a stallion and herding his mare. I have a grumpy gelding and a happy gelding. They live in separate pastures that are next to each other. They eat separate and have separate watering stations.


Can you tell who the grumpy one is?
 

1muttsfan

Up Northerner
Premium Feather Member
9 Years
Mar 26, 2011
21,316
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Upper Peninsula Michigan
I had a gelding that was quite wicked to a pony added to the herd. A dog shock collar made a huge improvement in his behavior - when he had his teeth poised over the pony's rump I would give him a jolt (he couldn't see me at the time). He thought that little pony packed a big whallup! Only required 3 shocks over 2 days, and no one was hurt.
 

QChickieMama

Songster
8 Years
Oct 1, 2011
356
19
176
I had a gelding that was quite wicked to a pony added to the herd. A dog shock collar made a huge improvement in his behavior - when he had his teeth poised over the pony's rump I would give him a jolt (he couldn't see me at the time). He thought that little pony packed a big whallup! Only required 3 shocks over 2 days, and no one was hurt.
That is funny! I was even muttering to this horse, "I wish I could put that dog collar on you!" Hmm. Maybe we'll mess with that idea. He needs a bit of instruction.
 

theoldchick

The Chicken Whisperer
Premium Feather Member
10 Years
May 11, 2010
30,157
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They do make electronic collars for horses. I did not recommend one in this case because the OP states she has no experiences with horses, and she does not own these horses. Nothing like trying to explain to horse owner why their horse is wearing a shock collar. Or having to explain why the horse wearing the shock collar ran through the fence when over corrected by the device.
 

QChickieMama

Songster
8 Years
Oct 1, 2011
356
19
176
They do make electronic collars for horses. I did not recommend one in this case because the OP states she has no experiences with horses, and she does not own these horses. Nothing like trying to explain to horse owner why their horse is wearing a shock collar. Or having to explain why the horse wearing the shock collar ran through the fence when over corrected by the device.
Fear not. We won't be actually doing this. Just wish I could teach Mr. Gelding to give Ms. Mare peace.

So, I can 1. separate them, or 2. leave them to their own ways.
 

horsedirtocala

In the Brooder
7 Years
May 28, 2012
57
0
41
Morriston/Ocala Florida
If you can seperate them but yet they can see eachother, that would be best. I have a bully gelding and a Burro jenny. He "herds" her but she only let`s him go so far and keeps him in line..
 

Peaches Lee

Crowing
9 Years
Sep 19, 2010
1,985
556
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Pennsylvania
First, most if not all horses will not share something as tasty as grain with another horse. If the mare is having weight issues now when the good green grass of spring and summer is here, then seperation is the best option for this mare so she can plump up before the onset of winter and get her ration of grain. Good luck. :)
 

Kelly G

It's like herding cats!
12 Years
Mar 19, 2008
1,943
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Tampa (Wesley Chapel), Florida
My Coop
I am also in the camp that says keep them separate but within eyesight of each other.

They will not be lonely if they can see each other, and the mare's quality of life will be greatly improved.

In addition to the mare's weight issues, if you add to the the stress of frequently being harassed you are creating a perfect storm for the development of ulcers. Then they owners will have themselves a big, expenisve, dangerous problem.

If you can separate them and still keep them withing sight of each other - you will have solved the problem.
 
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