How old when ready?

Discussion in 'Other Pets & Livestock' started by Josh45640, Jul 13, 2011.

  1. Josh45640

    Josh45640 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    How old do baby bunnies have to be before they can be sent to new homes? Mine seem to be weaned and eating ok, but theyre only around 4 weeks old.
     
  2. Chickerdoodle13

    Chickerdoodle13 The truth is out there...

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    People usually rehome them between 6 and 8 weeks old. Some keep them a bit longer until about 10 weeks, but generally I find them more than ready at 8 weeks. The only problem with waiting longer is you have to start separating the boys and girls.
     
  3. dewey

    dewey Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Quote:The ARBA recommends not before 8 weeks old.

    Mortality for babies is highest at 4 to 8 weeks of age while their very delicate digestive system fully develops.
     
  4. Josh45640

    Josh45640 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Thanks for the info. Ill keep them for another few weeks then.
     
  5. bobwhitelover

    bobwhitelover Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I would say not before 7 wks! There have been health problems with kits set out to new homes younger then ready.
     
  6. dewey

    dewey Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Josh, that's good. Here's just 1 link of many that explains why they need to stay with the doe for as long as possible. Rabbits systems are unlike any other and need special care and considerations. [​IMG] [​IMG]

    http://www.bio.miami.edu/hare/poop.html

    "...If younger than eight weeks, and no longer with his mother, his runny stool problem may be due to his being weaned too young. Many pet stores will (illegally) sell rabbits younger than eight weeks of age (some as young as four weeks), because that is when they are still "cute" and more apt to be purchased on a whim. Sadly, many of these babies are doomed to succumb to intestinal disorders.

    Unlike most mammals, baby rabbits have a sterile lower intestine until they begin to eat solid food at the age of 3-4 weeks. It is during this time that their intestines are at their most vulnerable: the babies need their mother's milk, which changes pH and provides vital antibodies that help the baby gradually adjust to his changing intestinal environment, to protect them against newly introduced microorganisms. Without mother's milk, a baby starting to eat solid food is highly susceptible to bacterial enteritis (inflammation of the intestinal lining), which can cause fatal diarrhea. Runny stool in a baby rabbit should be considered a life-threatening emergency..."
     
  7. mother o' chicks72

    mother o' chicks72 Chillin' With My Peeps

    Mar 21, 2011
    Portland, Oregon
    I don't know about any of that but my baby bunny is maybe six weeks old and his poop looks ok so i shouldn't have to worry should I?
     
  8. chickbea

    chickbea Chillin' With My Peeps

    Jan 18, 2007
    Vermont
    ...and when you do send them off be sure to include a small supply of the food that they have been eating.
     
  9. debilorrah

    debilorrah The Great Guru of Yap Premium Member

    Quote:The ARBA recommends not before 8 weeks old.

    Mortality for babies is highest at 4 to 8 weeks of age while their very delicate digestive system fully develops.

    This is absolutely correct. In fact, ARBA won't allow babies at a show under 6 weeks old because of this.
     
  10. debilorrah

    debilorrah The Great Guru of Yap Premium Member

    mother o' chicks72 :

    I don't know about any of that but my baby bunny is maybe six weeks old and his poop looks ok so i shouldn't have to worry should I?

    No need to worry unless the poop is runny. I also want to point out that here in CA it is illegal to send a bun to a new home before 8 weeks.​
     

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