How To Raise A Rooster

Discussion in 'Chicken Behaviors and Egglaying' started by newbie32, Sep 5, 2013.

  1. newbie32

    newbie32 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Many people end up with at least one rooster in each batch. After so many weeks of raising these guys it can be hard to part with one. There are all kinds of stories of the perfect rooster. Unfortunately there are even more stories of floggings and temperamental roosters. We all strive for the perfect protector for our hens, the one that is docile to humans and easy going with the hens.
    What are your methods for raising a non aggressive rooster? How do you interact with them from day one? What breeds have been the most docile? When does the aggression begin? Do you treat the rooster differently after you learn that it is in fact a rooster?
    Share your stories! I want to do this right so I will never have to give up a rooster that I adore.


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    Last edited: Sep 10, 2013
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  2. aoxa

    aoxa Overrun With Chickens

    The secret is to treat a rooster like a rooster. Do not hold him, or baby him. This only makes for big issues.

    Hands off is the very best approach. Don't hand feed, cuddle, pet, or walk around him. Walk through him. If he is in your way, make him move. You need to earn his respect.

    As for breeds that are less likely to turn aggressive.. it is usually an individual thing. Hatchery boys are unpredictable in any breed. Find a breeder that selects for temperament, because this aggressive behaviour is highly inheritable.

    It's a combination of Nature AND Nurture.
     
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  3. newbie32

    newbie32 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    At what age would I start to do this? I don't want to treat my hens that way and I am not sure how many are of which sex. They are only 6 weeks old.
     
  4. aoxa

    aoxa Overrun With Chickens

    At six weeks, you should have a good idea on genders if you ask around on here. Unless they are silkies.

    You would want to do it as soon as you can.
     
  5. newbie32

    newbie32 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Yeah I was planning on posting a few pictures soon. Has your method always worked?
     
  6. aoxa

    aoxa Overrun With Chickens

    Always. I had two mean roosters this year. Both were handled way too much growing up. I have SO MANY boys right now, and none of them misbehave with humans.

    Your goal is to be the alpha rooster. Roosters that flog you see you as beneath them. You do not want to be beneath them. If you get one that is testy, know the signs early on and correct it. Never EVER run from a rooster flogging you. It's hard to recover from that.
     
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  7. goldielox

    goldielox Out Of The Brooder

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    Hi, hope I'm the right spot about Rooster. Rescued a young rooster. He isn't crowing yet and I did try introducing while asleep. Well, the last three days I haven't been able to get in in the enclosure as I free range during the day. I worry though he gets up high on my husbands tow truck boom. It's a cute picture, lol non the less, I locked him in with the hens today and plan to leave them in enclosure coop area. Hopefully they will quit ganging up on him. He is breeding yet but attacks me like crazy. I can pick him up, but he will peck me first if I let him. He is not bloody but I feel bad, he stuck his head through the fence and laid down. A few still ace and pecked him, starting with Matilda. She is the bottom of the pecking order. I have food in several locations and two kart waterers. Hoping he will grow up fast and start crowing. I believe he is a RIR. Any ideas and will he be beautiful?
     
  8. aoxa

    aoxa Overrun With Chickens

    He'll fit in soon enough. It may take time.

    Also want to add, that not all roosters handled regularly will turn out like I mentioned, but there is a much higher probability if you do.

    Quote: I have noticed that a lot of people are having problems with their roosters turning on them and sometimes several roosters, some folks kill or give away the bad rooster while others just carry a broom stick with them all the time always fearing they will be attacked this is a real shame to lose a valuable member of your flock or to dread caring for your own birds roosters spurs are very hard and sharp they can inflict a lot of damage to your legs that could require stitches and antibiotics so the best thing you can do for yourself and your family is to prevent the bad behavior in your roosters.
    I have been raising chickens all my life and even though I do not have a PHD in animal physically I feel I have a good understanding of their behavior. In the flock the toughest rooster rules the roost he protects the hens from predators and rival males he takes his job very serious and is always alert the only way he can be overthrown is in a fierce battle two males will fight until the losser gives in and runs off the top rooster is rarely challenged though since the lower guys all fear and respect him in the barnyard respect goes along way now that I have explained how the guys think I will tell you how to raise up a rooster who is less likly to attack you.
    I am a firm believer that cuddling a rooster is a HUGE mistake so no hugging and kissing your baby rooster yes I know he is so cute and sweet (for now) but let's face it you are showing him that you are a big softie and he will grow up with zero respect for you and when he wants to show off how tough he is for the girls he will choose you as a sparring partner if you must hug and hold a chicken the girls can make great pets, now you don't have to be mean to the little guys I only handle my boys when I have to move them, trim nails and spurs or give them a treatment etc I am around them a lot and maybe I talk to them ;) so they still know me as their caretaker and I do love my boys but they are not treated as pets, I have been given so many roosters over the years who were mean as snakes and EVERY single one had grown up as a named beloved pet. When you are in your chicken yard or pen always carry your head high with a I am the boss attitude the roosters will take note and most will never dream of messing with you now every once in awhile there is one who still feels the need to show off he will walk along side you in a dominent posture if you walk away he will think he intimidated you and next time he will mock charge you as you walk away from him this will soon turn into an attack or chase you can nip it in the bud if when you see the first signs you turn towards him and calmly walk chase him until he is away from the flock or ducks under a building or bush do this every time you notice him being extra cocky it works on 9 out of 10 roos if he ever charges and attacks you kick him in self defence then run after him yelling it will scare the heck out of him don't worry you will not hurt him he will be fine he just needs an attitude adjustment and it will hurt his pride more then his body roosters understand violent acts better then loving ones if you have seen two fight you will understand I have had many roosters test me over the years and by standing my ground 99% have gave up and been fantastic members of my flock.
    Always explain to children who visit your flock that they are bigger and stronger then any chicken so there is no need to be scared most children are taught to fear roosters so if you tell them there is nothing to fear they will not know any better also tell them to never ever run from a chicken as this can turn even the sweetest rooster into a terror my own children and their cousins decided it was funny to go up to a bantam barred rock and then run away yelling well one day he decided to chase after them he later turned on everyone in sight and I had to get rid of him I was so mad at them and told them to never do it again or they would be grounded for the rest of their lives.
    Now some roosters no matter what you do are just mean some breeds, varieties and or bloodlines are known to be more aggressive if you cull these mean roosters and only allow good tempered roosters to reproduce you will be doing the world a favor there are so many sweet natured roos in this world who would love to replace the ol meanie in your flock so please don't feel bad you are doing the right thing.
    This is my experience with roosters and I have owned hundreds of them over the years so I know what methods work I am sure my views will annoy the rooster huggers sorry I hope you will not have to learn the hard way one day that I am right


    http://shilala.homestead.com/roosters.html

    https://www.backyardchickens.com/t/742168/how-to-raise-roosters-right
     
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  9. goldielox

    goldielox Out Of The Brooder

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    I agree with that. I don't want to hug him, only picked him up to move him. I hope he learns to crow but if he's vicious I would rather find a gorgeous Rooster that we can live happy with. I have a huge spotted Sussex hen named Helen. She will let me pick her up and hug her. Lol she hardly ever lays an egg but I love her and she is my pet. :)
     
  10. newbie32

    newbie32 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I honestly think it would be hard NOT to run if I am being flogged [​IMG]! I will take your advice about ignoring them, although it will hurt as I suspect my favorite is a roo [​IMG] also, the article you found is very helpful but I have a question about it....

    If I never pick them up and just ignore them then how will I know if they have lice or mites or anything that concerns the flock?
     

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