Howdy from L7 Farm

L7 Farm

In the Brooder
Nov 23, 2020
2
19
18
Heighdy ho

We are a micro farm in upstate New York, surrounded by the suburbs but adjacent to about 1000 acres of open space. The town we are in, despite having been predominantly a farming community for most of its existence, banned chickens a couple of decades ago as the suburbs took over. We moved in about eight years ago. Thanks to some enlightened town leadership, chickens have now been re-legalized on parcels less than five acres but with a maximum of six hens, no roosters.

Our farmlet once spread over 151 acres but it was subdivided over the years since World War I and now our part is just the original homestead and the area where most of the buildings were - from old, old aerial photos we know there were once 19 buildings on the lot, and our former chicken coop is now the neighbors' garage! The farm lost many of its buildings in a tornado in 1960, and there are only five outbuildings left, counting a more modern detached garage. The lot is now shaded in so we have a poor garden, but we try. We do have a full farm five doors down, and the area adjacent to us is zoned rural, but the reality is we're boxed in by modern suburban homes for the most part.

Our farm's "crop" is American Black Walnuts -- time-consuming to process but delicious, we harvest enough from 30+ heritage trees still on our lot for a small cash crop every year.

Getting back to chickens...

My spouse grew up on a larger farm, where they always kept chickens, and so she knows quite a bit about keeping them. We're in good shape there for "new" chicken keepers, but are aware there's always more to learn.

We do have quite a large number of potential predators because of the open space both to the rear of the property and across the road from us -- the usual raccoons (very adept at stealing our pears), skunks, etc, plenty of raptors (we see at least 1-2 squirrels taken from our lot every year), and some more exotic ones -- we've spotted a fisher on the property twice, and foxes and coyotes are around as well. So we're keen on picking up tips here to keep them away. (We unfortunately do not have a dog.)

Because we're limited to six, and there are restrictions on placement and use (we can't sell eggs commercially), we are only looking for eggs for ourselves and neighbors. There are concerns about annoying the neighbors, who are fortunately relatively far away on both sides (and we have nothing in our rear). We don't seem to have a lot of neighborhood outside cats, are there are a couple, and one dog that tends to stray off its property from time to time.
.
My wife has her favorite breeds but we're starting out with Buff Orpingtons to both keep the noise down and placate one of our kids, who's very apprehensive about chickens (and is afraid of his grandparents' birds, even though they're very docile.) We've got an order in for chicks in the spring and are just squaring things away now, since the process of getting the permits for a Coop are a little involved.

So, that's it, happy to be here and back in the fold of chickendom.
 
Last edited:

Hei 20

Crowing
Oct 8, 2020
1,864
9,855
323
Heighdy ho

We are a micro farm in upstate New York, surrounded by the suburbs but adjacent to about 1000 acres of open space. The town we are in, despite having been predominantly a farming community for most of its existence, banned chickens a couple of decades ago as the suburbs took over. We moved in about eight years ago. Thanks to some enlightened town leadership, chickens have now been re-legalized on parcels less than five acres but with a maximum of six hens, no roosters.

Our farmlet once spread over 151 acres but it was subdivided over the years since World War I and now our part is just the original homestead and the area where most of the buildings were - from old, old aerial photos we know there were once 19 buildings on the lot, and our former chicken coop is now the neighbors' garage! The farm lost many of its buildings in a tornado in 1960, and there are only five outbuildings left, counting a more modern detached garage. The lot is now shaded in so we have a poor garden, but we try. We do have a full farm five doors down, and the area adjacent to us is zoned rural, but the reality is we're boxed in by modern suburban homes for the most part.

Our farm's "crop" is American Black Walnuts -- time-consuming to process but delicious, we harvest enough from 30+ heritage trees still on our lot for a small cash crop every year.

Getting back to chickens...

My spouse grew up on a larger farm, where they always kept chickens, and so she knows quite a bit about keeping them. We're in good shape there for "new" chicken keepers, but are aware there's always more to learn.

We do have quite a large number of potential predators because of the open space both to the rear of the property and across the road from us -- the usual raccoons (very adept at stealing our pears), skunks, etc, plenty of raptors (we see at least 1-2 squirrels taken from our lot every year), and some more exotic ones -- we've spotted a fisher on the property twice, and foxes and coyotes are around as well. So we're keen on picking up tips here to keep them away. (We unfortunately do not have a dog.)

Because we're limited to six, and there are restrictions on placement and use (we can't sell eggs commercially), we are only looking for eggs for ourselves and neighbors. There are concerns about annoying the neighbors, who are fortunately relatively far away on both sides (and we have nothing in our rear). We don't seem to have a lot of neighborhood outside cats, are there are a couple, and one dog that tends to stray off its property from time to time.
.
My wife has her favorite breeds but we're starting out with Buff Orpingtons to both keep the noise down and placate one of our kids, who's very apprehensive about chickens (and is afraid of his grandparents' birds, even though they're very docile.) We've got an order in for chicks in the spring and are just squaring things away now, since the process of getting the permits for a Coop are a little involved.

So, that's it, happy to be here and back in the fold of chickendom.
Welcome to
Backyard Chickens
 

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416bigbore

Not A Care In The World !
Premium Feather Member
Jun 11, 2020
2,336
11,428
446
NC
:welcome:woot:woot:celebrate:yesss: Welcome to BYC, You found an Awesome Forum to be a part of with lots of great knowledgeable members who are more then willing to jump in and help you with any questions you may have. :)

Interesting history where you are at, thanks for sharing. :) We started a small flock this spring with four Isa Brown hens just for the fresh chicken egg factor and twelve ducks. Two small breed Mallard hens and ten Rouen/Pekin mix, four Drakes and six Hens from that batch. We started out with ducklings more for pets not thinking what great egg layers they are also, some days we will have our four chicken eggs and six duck eggs to boot. So we also enjoy that added cool factor with our ducks and their eggs are very tasty and people love them for baking over chicken eggs we have been finding out. We have no problem getting rid of the extra eggs. LOL

As for noise the only time I ever hear the Isa Browns start to cluck is after one of them has laid an egg and is announcing it to the others and then they are quiet again for another 24 hours. LOL

Our hen ducks is another story, they hear me coming out of the house in the morning and they all start coming alive with their very load Mallard Quack! Quack! I love that sound! I would much rather hear a duck in the morning over a Roo who don't know when to shut up! LOL

Best of luck and please keep us posted with your journey and pics are always appreciated! :celebrate
 

DobieLover

Easily distracted by chickens
Premium Feather Member
Jul 23, 2018
25,669
197,274
1,612
NY Southern Tier
My Coop
Hello back at you from Upstate NY and welcome to BYC! :frow Glad you joined.

What are the coop requirements for 6 birds?

If the chickens are legal and the neighbors aren't that close I wouldn't worry too much about the noise. Yes, they will make noise but it's not that bad. I would not attempt free ranging them as they WILL go wherever they want and WILL end up on the neighbors property sooner or later. Make the largest predator proof run that you can and put a solid roof on it if you are permitted. It will make the chickens happier and easier for you to care for them.

My run is predator proof and I don't close the pop door to the coop so the coop itself runs a bit smaller per bird than is normally recommended but because the run is basically an extension of the coop, they have lots of space. The minimum coop size if you cannot have a predator proof run attached is 4 sq feet per bird. The minimum run size (for ME at least) is 15 sq ft per bird (that includes the coop area because they will have access to it during the day as well). Put lots of things to perch on and hide behind in the run so they have things to do during the day so they aren't bored. Bored chickens are loud chickens and sometimes mean chickens.

If you can build a walk-in style coop and run, that would be my recommendation as well. Use 1/2" hardware cloth to cover all openings and have no gaps anywhere in the setup that is greater than 1/2". You should do well.

Good luck.
 

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