INDIANA BYC'ers HERE!

Discussion in 'Where am I? Where are you!' started by jchny2000, Dec 18, 2012.

  1. Old Salt 1945

    Old Salt 1945 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    My grandfather had a feather bed in the back spare bedroom that I slept on as a kid.

    I remember it well. When I laid on it, all the feathers scooched out to the sides and I laid basically on the board frame. The quills poked through the fabric and I, being a kid, busied myself grabbing them and pulling the feather through. In the morning the floor was littered with small feathers that I had thrown overboard. I hated the blasted feather bed. It would have been more comfortable sleeping on the floor. Except that there was no heat in the room and it was so cold that water would freeze in a glass and break it. There was a coal potbellied stove in the living room and the dining room. Nothing else. The house was huge. It was built in 1828. I recently visited there and the house is being refurbished and listed on the historic something list.

    John
     
  2. exop

    exop Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Everything went well in Lebanon... the sales cage area was more or less anarchy, not visibly overseen by anybody but still operating smoothly. Four or five double rows of show cages on trestle tables, uder a picnic shelter. Show staff had attached a slip of yellow paper assigning a name to each cage. There was an "Indiana BYC'ers here" sign nearby, but no visible BYC'ers; probably because of the discouraging weather.

    Most cages did have a note or business card explaining how to get hold of the seller... things must have been considerably different before there were cell phones. There was a steady drift of people staring intently at the birds, and peripatetic sellers (the most visible Joel Henning, with his distinctive jacket) bustling back and forth. Cages could be refilled at will, but of course birds added toward the end of the show were less likely to be seen by interested parties.

    Best - exop
     
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  3. Leahs Mom

    Leahs Mom Chicken Obsessed

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  4. CCCCCCCCHICKENS

    CCCCCCCCHICKENS Overrun With Chickens

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    If someone is going to get pigeons, I suggest tumbler pigeons.
     
  5. Leahs Mom

    Leahs Mom Chicken Obsessed

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    I posted this from last year in the DIY thread but posting it here too regarding heating the water heaters.
    This is what I made last year.

    ***************************

    Base Water Heaters

    And the base heaters I made from heated dog bowls last year. Will probably use again with these glass waterers this year but I also have a different idea I'd like to try too.

    I needed to rig something to keep water from freezing on the broody side of the hen house with the vintage glass waterer. I also used these under pie pans with fermented feed in them to keep it from freezing solid since I put out a bunch when I go out to work in the morning for the whole day.


    I first thought about making a "cookie tin heater" or a light bulb and block but decided not to do that as I feel that they may pose a fire risk for various reasons.

    Instead, I decided to use the heating element from a heated dog bowl. That way, if my experiment doesn't work - or when I'm done using it - I still have a heated dog bowl to use! Double duty and these heat elements are designed to do the job already and wired correctly to handle the job...I feel the risk of fire is much lower using these elements. They also have the thermostatic control built right in so I don't have to purchase another item!

    So...here we go.

    Here's the water bowl right from the farm store. $14.99
    [​IMG]





    Here's the bowl after I removed the heating element.
    [​IMG]


    Here's the heating element. I believe the part in the center is the thermostatic heat sensor. It will only heat when the temperature drops below a certain degrees. I think it upper 30's on these. Under the heat element is Styrofoam for insulation and the plastic base that normally sits under the dog bowl.
    [​IMG]


    Here is a cookie tin I picked up at Good Will $0.75. Notice that the top has a rim that will catch water if I have a leak. It was just the right size for the heater base....this is VERY COOL as I purchased it the day before I picked up the dog bowl and had no real idea that it would fit. I think that was Providential...just sayin' [​IMG]
    [​IMG]





    I used Duct tape to attach the cookie tin lid to the heater base. Here you see the plastic bottom-side of the heater base which is normally under the dog bowl.
    [​IMG]


    When completely taped down, the duct tape is fully covering the edges so that no water or shavings can get in there.
    [​IMG]


    In the hen house:

    [​IMG]

    With Fermented Feed
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]

    I had a couple of them.
    [​IMG]




    Here is is with an evil plastic waterer base before I got the vintage glass bases. [​IMG]
    [​IMG]



    These bases only run 50 watts.
     
    Last edited: Oct 23, 2013
  6. Leahs Mom

    Leahs Mom Chicken Obsessed

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    It was noted that the bottom won't sit flat on those because of the cord, etc.

    It won't sit flat on a surface without a little more "tweaking".

    When it's used on the dog bowl, they have recessed it in. The bowl actually sits on the bottom rim of the bowl and there is a cut-out in the rim for the cord to go through. You can see it in this photo...the cut out is at the top left on the outer rim; the heat part sits up in the inner circle part.

    [​IMG]

    Being somewhat lazy and not wanting to build anything else [​IMG], I did a couple of easy fixes for this.

    1. I got 2 bricks or patio blocks, set them side by side with a gap between them, and let the raised part and cord sit down in the gap. That way the flat part of the base was resting on the blocks and the raised parts weren't causing things to "rock".

    2. Just set it on a block (as in the photo in my post) with the cord and uneven stuff partly hanging over the back.

    If the cookie lid had a taller edge, it could just sit on the rim like the dog bowl but you'd have to make a cut-out in the side for the cord.



    Oh...and I did try using a flat cookie tin lid on one of them but the chickens knocking things around like they do, the pans tended to slip right off of them. That little raised rim on the cookie tin lid helped keep things from sliding off.

    And not all heated dog bowls are created equal. Some of those heat bases are made differently so they may have different challenges than this one.
     
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  7. SallyinIndiana

    SallyinIndiana Overrun With Chickens

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  8. CCCCCCCCHICKENS

    CCCCCCCCHICKENS Overrun With Chickens

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    I bought a buff laced bearded polish pullet from Joel Henning, He was very nice. Told me a few things about the breed I didnt know. I only paid $25 and she is really pretty and friendly. I walked through the sales coops every 20 mins except for when I left for lunch.
     
  9. Leahs Mom

    Leahs Mom Chicken Obsessed

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    Feb 9, 2012
    Northern Indiana
  10. FarkerFarms

    FarkerFarms Out Of The Brooder

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    Lebanon, Indiana
    My neighbor raises and flies the tumbler pigeons. They are super cool to see fly, spiraling and plummeting towards the ground as a big group.
     

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