Input on coop dimensions please! Ordinance says 30sq ft coop & 50sq ft run

Discussion in 'Coop & Run - Design, Construction, & Maintenance' started by jbher, Oct 15, 2013.

  1. jbher

    jbher Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Hi all!

    So our shiny new ordinance is stating that coop size must not exceed 30 square feet and the run must not exceed 50 square feet. Height cannot exceed 8 feet tall (from ground to peak). Also, we are not allowed to free range - so they must stay in their coop or run. At least for the first year of the ordinance - we plan to go back and ask for supervised free range time after the one year is up.

    I'm struggling with coop dimensions. I'd love to know your input!! Here's some sketches I drew up (I want a walk-in coop) and below my coop sketches are sketchup drawings of the area I have to work with and some different layout for coop and run sizes within my square feet limitations.

    Thoughts? Suggestions??

    Thanks in advance!!


    {my coop sketches I drew up... like the one on the far right and the one in the middle the best so far}
    [​IMG]

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  2. Bear Foot Farm

    Bear Foot Farm Overrun With Chickens

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    Squares (or nearly square) will take less material, and be the simplest to build

    It's sad they didn't allow 32 sq ft, since that would be a 4 X 8, and would require fewer cuts because most building materials come in even lengths, divisible by 4

    The bottom drawing uses less fencing materials since you're using the coop as one "wall"

    If the blue area is your yard, make sure you leave enough room on all sides for mowers
     
  3. heidisue

    heidisue Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Love the one on the right :) it is too bad - 32 would be so much easier lumber wise. Maybe 4x7 so you at least have less waste using the 4' side.
     
  4. jbher

    jbher Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Originally the ordinance stated that coops could only be 25sq ft and runs 40sq ft and 6' 6" tall. We had to work with them just to extend the sizes to what they are now. Like you said, it is definitely a bummer that it's not that extra 2' to make for easier building.

    The blue area is along our fence line and is currently mulched and edged - to the right are evergreens and the left is my garden. We thankfully won't need to mow any of that area. Should I think about wind direction or anything like that when figuring out the layout? North is the top and West is to the right on those drawings.

    Is there any problems to having a coop 4' deep? I mean would it be easier to have everything layed out as more square shaped? So that 5'x6' coop with a 5'x10' run or something like that? My husband was thinking that it may be easier to fit something 4x7 for a coop but that seems so narrow inside...
     
  5. StupidBird

    StupidBird Chillin' With My Peeps

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    My initial thought here is to improve room inside this restrictive foot print by building upwards. Like a layer cake. Just to give you and the birds room. Anyone do this over at the design coop gallery?
     
  6. heidisue

    heidisue Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I think 4x7 would be easier to do and actually seem roomier than 5x6. Think of it this way - you would have 2 square feet left to create outside egg boxed if you wanted too. Plus, the birds have more room on the diagonal, which gives you more space for roosts. What I mean by that is, as long as they are not overcrowded, they have more room with a 4x7. On a smaller scale (just for an example) 2 birds in a 4x1 coop can isolate themselves better than 2 birds in a 2x2 coop, but 4 birds in either size is the same.
     
  7. jbher

    jbher Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I plan to do outside egg boxes - I just don't have them drawn into the sketchup drawings I whipped up. So if I did 4x7, which side would I put the roosts? On the 4' side or the 7' side? We are only allowed a maximum of 5 hens :-(
     
  8. Kelsie2290

    Kelsie2290 True BYC Addict Premium Member

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    Are you planning on storing anything inside the coop, or will it all be used for the birds? What about outside nest boxes, would they count against your square footage? Removable ones? I have some 4x8 coops, I like a human door on the short side, as heidisue says, that gives you more room for roosts, mine have a ladder type against the back wall and two longer ones from one end to the other from the door. If you plan on storing things in the coop, the door in the middle might be easier since you could use one side for storage and one for the chickens.
    I would look at wind direction, especially where the snow comes from so you don't spend as much time shoveling out the door every time it snows. In the summer does one side offer more shade or something, I realize you are in WI so that may not be much of a consideration.
    It is probably hopeless, but if you want to try and preserve the grass in the run or keep some greenery in there, you might consider if you can lay it out to divide the run in more than one piece.
     
  9. heidisue

    heidisue Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Put the roosts on the 4' side - a few at different heights. Here is a pic of my roosts (on the right side - the ladder thing). 2x4's are better for most, but I am in Arizona so very little risk of frostbite and I have banties. [​IMG].
     
  10. heidisue

    heidisue Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Good point about the wind :) you can also put it near something that blocks eind - a small wall or tree, to cut back on those snow drifts.
     

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