Is September too late to get chicks in the midwest?

Discussion in 'Raising Baby Chicks' started by BJ, Jul 25, 2008.

  1. BJ

    BJ Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Mar 20, 2007
    I live in Indiana. I had to do a re-order on chicks because my first batch from a local hatchery turned out to be all roosters (even though I ordered pullets). This time I ordered through MyPetChicken and I have a feeling I won't get them until September. It starts to get cold around here by the end of September. That would give the chicks just 4 - 5 weeks by the time they would be turned out into the coop and into the cold. Thoughs...suggestions please?

    Should I cancel my order until Spring??
     
  2. BearSwampChick

    BearSwampChick Chicken Sensei

    Jan 10, 2008
    Marysville, OH
    That's a good question. It usually takes 8 weeks for them to feather out fully. I'd like to know the answer, too. [​IMG]
     
  3. Farmer Kitty

    Farmer Kitty Flock Mistress

    Sep 18, 2007
    Wisconsin
    It really depends on the coop you have. Can you put a heat lamp out there? Is it draft free? Do you have older chickens you will be integrating with at that time?
     
  4. ChickenToes

    ChickenToes Chillin' With My Peeps

    May 14, 2008
    NE Wisconsin
    I plan on hatching some eggs this fall, sometime in September probably. I'll keep them in the brooder for a few weeks, then they'll go into the coop with the other birds. If I'm worried about it being too cold for them, I plan on building a makeshift pen for them in the basement until they're fully feathered.
     
  5. BJ

    BJ Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Mar 20, 2007
    I have a small coop...appropriate for 4-5 full size chickens. It is equipped with heat lamps. The run is open, though, and I would expect that they would want to come into the run during the day, where they would catch the chill and the cold fall breeze. I could definitely brood them in our garage for 4 to 5 weeks, but by that time, they will be driving me crazy and probably escaping and pooing all over the garage, so I would definely want to get them out to the coop.

    We have one lonely bantam currently who would welcome their company. The breed I am getting is buff orpington.

    So...what do y'all think?
     
  6. ChickenToes

    ChickenToes Chillin' With My Peeps

    May 14, 2008
    NE Wisconsin
    After brooding them for a few weeks, you can move them into the coop and keep them confined in there for a few weeks until they are more fully feathered. Some people like to do this anyway so their chickens understand that the coop is 'home.'
     
  7. Gracie_Chickie

    Gracie_Chickie Out Of The Brooder

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    Sep 22, 2007
    Indiana
    I live in Indiana and we got our chickens last September 18th. I moved them to the coop at approx 8 weeks.
    Orpingtons are cold hardy and should do fine. My only problem the whole winter was that my RIR roo got a little frostbite on one of his comb tips. That was in zero weather in February. I brooded them in a large dog crate lined with cardboard in the garage.
     

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