Ligh sussex X lavender orpington?

Discussion in 'Chicken Behaviors and Egglaying' started by yikyak, Oct 23, 2015.

  1. yikyak

    yikyak Out Of The Brooder

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    Hi I had recently just got a LO rooster to breed with my Ls hens. I was just wondering if breeding the two together would create a more broody light Sussex offspring? Thanks for all your help:)
     
  2. Ridgerunner

    Ridgerunner Chicken Obsessed

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    It depends. Do you know if the flocks the LS hens and LO roster came from often go broody? While any hen of any breed and from any flock might go broody, any hen also might never go broody.

    Broodiness is an inherited trait. Both parents contribute genetics to that. Some breeds have trends but I find strain has a lot more to do with it than breed. Rhode Island Reds are known to not go broody a lot, but if the person selecting which chickens get to breed select for broodiness, they will soon have a flock of RIR’s that go broody a lot. Orpington are known to go broody a lot, but if the person selecting which Orpington get to breed hatch eggs from hens that do not go broody, pretty soon you have a flock of Orpington that seldom go broody.

    Do your Light Sussex go broody a lot? Sussex are known to go broody. It’s a breed trend. Orpington also tend to go broody. In theory if your chickens follow breed trends you should have broody hens from that cross. You should have broody hens from your LS. But whether you actually do or not will depend a lot on which flocks they came from.

    I’ve been through that. Orpington that supposedly go broody a lot did not. Black Australorp that can go broody did a lot. Speckled Sussex that are supposed to go broody did not. These were all hatchery chicks. I selected my breeding flock from the hens that did go broody and greatly increased how often my hens go broody. It took a few generations but not that many. There was a big jump after I selected a rooster from a hen that went broody.
     
  3. yikyak

    yikyak Out Of The Brooder

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    I'm not really sure if the hens have broody traits. I got them from these people who got theirs from an endangered breed rescue program. They have not gone broody yet once, but I hope they do because I don't really what to buy an incubator because of the price and because it seems like a hassle to use. Worst comes to worst I'll probably get one. As for the rooster, I got him from some people who wanted to get rid of him because he was bulling their ducks (even though he has been really nice to the hens so far). I'll ask the people I got the hens from about the broodiness . Thanks for your help:D[​IMG]
     
  4. chickenshiha

    chickenshiha Chillin' With My Peeps

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    palestine
    im just like you always want broody hens to get a bigger flock and I just love chicks I can show you pics of the cross as I crossed a buff orpington and a light Sussex just wait a min until I upload the pic from my phone
     
  5. chickenshiha

    chickenshiha Chillin' With My Peeps

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    palestine
    im just like you I love broody hens and chicks I only get the hardy fat breeds that go broody I have a bo and Sussex cross just need to upload the pic from my phone wait a min
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    this is a cock at 12 weeks butt its a bo and Sussex cross you get what im saying can you show me your lo roo and this breed will go 90% broody as the crosses bred from this both go broody
     
    Last edited: Oct 24, 2015
  6. chickenshiha

    chickenshiha Chillin' With My Peeps

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    palestine
    [​IMG]\
    sorry wrong pic
     
    Last edited: Oct 24, 2015
  7. chickenshiha

    chickenshiha Chillin' With My Peeps

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    palestine
    well somtime broody breeds that go broody may not go broody if not hatch from a good mother or non breed or most of all incubators the mom should be broody and good mommy to so leghorns or rir for example might go broody if bred by a broody and good mother breed I had 2 leghorns that went broody there broody mom was a game bird good mothers but be carful as they might be aggressive as gamebirds that was a mistake to let her go broody as I had a Wyandotte go broody and shehad less chicks than the game
     
  8. Faraday40

    Faraday40 Overrun With Chickens

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    We recently hatched Coronation Sussex (hen) x Lav Orpington (roo) eggs and got some beautiful chicks. All looked like pure lav orps but the personalities were outstanding. We kept 2 pullets. (both are big, fluffy lap chickens that can be scooped up by any kid. Also easily trained to do all sorts of tricks.) Here they are at 5 .5 months old.


    This is Sweetie. My daughter's fav. Trained to come to her name & jump up into a lap if you pat your leg.
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    This is Nemo. My preschool son decided this was HIS chicken. He plays on the swingset & treehouse with it. He even rides his bike with this chicken on the handlebars.
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    Some Nemo pics from a few months ago.
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  9. yikyak

    yikyak Out Of The Brooder

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    Sep 25, 2015
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    Hi faraday, those pullets look amazing they are so cute. My hens are probably going to turn out with a bit more white because I'm breeding with light not coronation Sussex. I have a few questions, are they more broody from what you have seen so far? What's their eggs size? Do they have more Sussex or Orpington traits? Thanks for sharing those awesome pics!
     
  10. Faraday40

    Faraday40 Overrun With Chickens

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    Neither breed is a high producer, but personality keeps them around. I've had a lot of orpingtons & love them all. They're easy to train & good lap chickens. The mixes are even better, though.

    This was the mom. As you can see, she was rather large with lots of fluff. Sweetie has her body shape & comb with the roo's color. Nemo looks all orp. The mom was at the bottom of the pecking order, but the offspring are doing fine. We hatched a bunch in the spring & every time I sold out of these within 24 hrs. I was hoping to get some variety, but all were solid lavender. Next year, I plan to hatch some of their eggs x an unrelated black/ lav split roo. From the roo, we should get 50% lav & 50% black- with the recessive lav gene. What I want to know is if the collar will show up in future generations.

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    So far no eggs from the mixes. I only have one hen that goes broody. She's a bantam orp & went broody 5 times in one year! (& hatched chicks 3 of those times) My full size orps sometimes think about going broody but when taken off the nest, they forget about it. The bantam will even try to incubate invisible eggs. When I break her from setting, she lays for 2 weeks, then goes broody again.

    I've heard that many bantam breeds have more broodiness. Their smaller size means less eggs. (Mine can fit about 8-9 LF eggs) The larger breeds can fit more eggs but might also break them when getting in & out of the nest.
     
    Last edited: Nov 18, 2015

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