Odd Growths On Chicks

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by Appytaz, Jun 12, 2009.

  1. Appytaz

    Appytaz Songster

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    We have 9 babies that hatched about 6 weeks ago. They are all doing just fine with a MAJOR problem now. They appear to have some kind of disease or "issue" that seems to be on all of them. I will get pictures today after work - but I was hoping someone may have some ideas in the mean time.

    I will describe it the best I can:

    They have what looks like a tumor or warts growing out by their nostril area and it is growing down towards the end of the beak. One seems to have these same growths on one eye. Another one has a pink bump by her eye.

    The momma is VERY AGGRESSIVE and when we go to feed she huddles everyone in the corner so we really haven't had alot of contact with them.

    Does anyone have any ideas????

    Thanks in Advance~
     
  2. dlhunicorn

    dlhunicorn Human Encyclopedia

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    Please do post pics... my first instinct is to say (dry) pox which is caused by mosquitoes (do a search on POX for the emergency forum > lots of posts and pics)
     
  3. Appytaz

    Appytaz Songster

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    Thank you very much - that makes sense considering we live on the lake! I am off to check the others now.

    Thanks Again!
     
  4. beakkeeper

    beakkeeper Songster

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    Doesn't Marek's also cause tumor-like things? I would go with dry pox, first, though.

    Fowl Pox

    Synonyms: chicken pox, avian diphtheria, bird pox, sore head

    Clinical Signs: There are two forms of fowl pox. The dry form is characterized by raised, wart-like lesions of unfeathered areas (head, legs, vent, etc.) The lesions heal in about two weeks. Unthriftiness and retarded growth are typical symptoms of fowl pox.

    Transmission: Fowl pox is transmitted by direct contact between infected and susceptible birds or by mosquitoes. Virus containing scabs also can be sloughed off from affected birds and serve as a source of infection. The virus can enter the blood stream through the eyes, skin wounds, or respiratory tract. Mosquitoes become infected from feeding on birds with fowl pox in the blood stream.

    Treatment: No treatment is available However, fowl pox is relatively slow spreading. Thus, it is possible to vaccinate to stop an outbreak.


    --G.D. Butcher, J.P. Jacob, and F.B. Maher

    As far as I know, I think FP-infected birds stay carriers for life, even if they recover. I wish I had better info for you... [​IMG]
     
  5. dlhunicorn

    dlhunicorn Human Encyclopedia

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    Doesn't Marek's also cause tumor-like things?

    This is not typical symptoms for Mareks (altho a photo would be nice first > Mareks not not typically first appear around the face > pox does)
    As far as I know, I think FP-infected birds stay carriers for life, even if they recover. I wish I had better info for you...

    The above statement infers that (as a "carrier") they can reinfect other birds later on after recovery... this is incorrect. They can be "reinfected " but usually not until the next season.
    Basically you treat the lesions with iodine or betadine and wait it out (and be alert for "wet" pox which is internal and much more severe ). It is very important to separate the birds from healthy stock at the first sign as it can be spread by the ill birds dander and saliva (think feed and water > it is important the ill birds have their own feeding and watering station and are kept well away from the other birds)​
     
    Last edited: Jun 12, 2009
  6. beakkeeper

    beakkeeper Songster

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    Quote:This is not typical symptoms for Mareks
    As far as I know, I think FP-infected birds stay carriers for life, even if they recover. I wish I had better info for you...

    The above statement infers that (as a "carrier") they can reinfect other birds later on after recovery... this is incorrect. They can be "reinfected " but usually not until the next season.
    Basically you treat the lesions with iodine or betadine and wait it out (and be alert for "wet" pox which is internal and much more severe ). It is very important to separate the birds from healthy stock at the first sign as it can be spread by the ill birds dander and saliva (think feed and water > it is important the ill birds have their own feeding and watering station and are kept well away from the other birds)​

    OK, wasn't positive on that one. Thanks, dlhunicorn!
     
  7. welovechickens

    welovechickens Songster

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    I'm pretty sure it is dry avian pox. I am posting a picture to a new thread, of my bantam who has it.
     
  8. threehorses

    threehorses Songster

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    Houston
  9. b.hromada

    b.hromada Flock Mistress

    One of my hens had that same ailment as your chicks. Most said it was probably dry pox. Anyway, they are gone now [​IMG]. I'm just happy it wasn't anything else. My daughter said that maybe she is allergic to something? Only thing I could think that was different that I have fed them, was mangos? You know how some people are allergic. Maybe chickens are too. [​IMG]
     
  10. SunnyChic

    SunnyChic Keep The Sunny Side Up

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    If it's fowl pox, Auburndale Farm & Garden (515 Ariana Ave) 863-967-3711 has the Poxine vaccine for birds 6 weeks and older. Here's a link with some info:
    Fowl Pox Info
     

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