GeneralSV

Chirping
Apr 7, 2019
36
30
64
I'm having an issue with pigeon mites, more specifically pseudolynchia canariensis, the pigeon louse fly. Are there any good safe products that I can use for their loft and on them?
 

EggSighted4Life

Crossing the Road
6 Years
Apr 9, 2016
14,638
20,586
892
California's Redwood Coast
Are there any good safe products that I can use for their loft and on them?
I use permethrin based ready to use product... sold in the equine section at most feed stores... but labeled for use in poultry... which I am unsure if pigeon counts... but think it would. It is not for use on cats....
TE006407

It is also for use on premises (loft). It is sold under many names (such as Martin's, Gordon's, etc) and in ready to use or more concentrated forms. This 32 oz ready to use trigger bottle, bought to combat mosquitoes lasted my flock of 82, 2 large goats, and 3 medium dogs for 2+ years... as it is very effective when used according to the label... meaning for something like lice that lays eggs doing a follow up treatment to completely disrupt the life cycle of said pest. I also sprayed my roosts, nest boxes, coop floor.

When treating the birds... it's a SMALL spritz just below the vent, under each wing pit, and to the back nape of the neck at the base of the head... making sure feathers are parted and the spray gets on the skin.

The only active ingredient is permethrin when you are looking at the products. These are readily available if you are in the U.S. Adding your general location to your profile can help peeps make the best suggestions possible at a glance. ;)

Hope this is helpful! :fl
 

jak2002003

Crowing
Oct 24, 2009
3,146
1,289
396
Thailand
These flies are really had to get rid of. When I first saw one on one of my birds I was freaked out.... they look and move about so creepy!!!!

I found the normal mite and insect powders and sprays did not harm them. They are really tough little things.

Good news is they live all their life cycle on the actual pigeons.. so you don't have to worry about eggs or young hiding in your coop.

In the end I found the best method for control is to simply hold onto the affected bird and wait till the see the fly.. then grab it and crush it!!!

They are tricky to get and even will fly off and come back. But after you get a few you will become expert at catching them. Don't worry they can't bite or hurt you.

My birds are usually free of them most of the year.. but because they free fly sometimes they get re infected from wild birds. But my crushing method keeps they at bay most of the time.
 

EggSighted4Life

Crossing the Road
6 Years
Apr 9, 2016
14,638
20,586
892
California's Redwood Coast
I found the normal mite and insect powders and sprays did not harm them. They are really tough little things.
For parasites that aren't effected as well by the permethrin such as some systemic feeders... many of us use pour on Ivermectin in the cattle section. It is not labeled for use in fowl due to not much research available showing residual in egg production for withdrawal times. But it's very effective against lice, mites, and many other things including some internal parasite. Most folks withhold eggs for about two weeks from the last treatment. Please tag or quote me if you help with dosing this medication.

Even when parasites live their entire life cycle on the host.. it is not uncommon for some (eggs on shed feather or bugs) to get knocked off or what have you and be in the bedding looking for a new host. It is a generally good idea to treat the immediate environment if you can. In fact, I researched this further as I don't like giving misinformation and what I found supports the need to treat environment...
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4906749/

Copied from that link...
"The life history of P. canariensis has features that make it amenable to study in the lab. Eggs are hatched in uterus in the female and then three stages of larvae feed from milk glands (Harwood and James 1979). The larvae pupate and female flies deposit puparia in the substrate in or around pigeon nests (Arcoverde et al. 2009). The flies will reproduce on captive birds, depositing puparia under layers of newspaper lining pigeon cages. Female P. canariensis produce their first puparium six days after their first blood meal; they produce one puparium about every two days thereafter (Herath 1966, Klei 1971)."

https://wiki.nus.edu.sg/display/TAX/Pseudolynchia+canariensis+-+Pigeon+Fly

According to Merck veterinary manual... permethrin based spray IS effective against said pest AND safe for use...
https://www.merckvetmanual.com/integumentary-system/flies/hippoboscid-or-louse-flies

This source also claims permethrin based spray as effective for current discussion...
https://www.hackemerlofts.com/ask/ask040.html

After extensive research... I stand by my first post. Best wishes! :fl
 

jak2002003

Crowing
Oct 24, 2009
3,146
1,289
396
Thailand
For parasites that aren't effected as well by the permethrin such as some systemic feeders... many of us use pour on Ivermectin in the cattle section. It is not labeled for use in fowl due to not much research available showing residual in egg production for withdrawal times. But it's very effective against lice, mites, and many other things including some internal parasite. Most folks withhold eggs for about two weeks from the last treatment. Please tag or quote me if you help with dosing this medication.

Even when parasites live their entire life cycle on the host.. it is not uncommon for some (eggs on shed feather or bugs) to get knocked off or what have you and be in the bedding looking for a new host. It is a generally good idea to treat the immediate environment if you can. In fact, I researched this further as I don't like giving misinformation and what I found supports the need to treat environment...
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4906749/

Copied from that link...
"The life history of P. canariensis has features that make it amenable to study in the lab. Eggs are hatched in uterus in the female and then three stages of larvae feed from milk glands (Harwood and James 1979). The larvae pupate and female flies deposit puparia in the substrate in or around pigeon nests (Arcoverde et al. 2009). The flies will reproduce on captive birds, depositing puparia under layers of newspaper lining pigeon cages. Female P. canariensis produce their first puparium six days after their first blood meal; they produce one puparium about every two days thereafter (Herath 1966, Klei 1971)."

https://wiki.nus.edu.sg/display/TAX/Pseudolynchia+canariensis+-+Pigeon+Fly

According to Merck veterinary manual... permethrin based spray IS effective against said pest AND safe for use...
https://www.merckvetmanual.com/integumentary-system/flies/hippoboscid-or-louse-flies

This source also claims permethrin based spray as effective for current discussion...
https://www.hackemerlofts.com/ask/ask040.html

After extensive research... I stand by my first post. Best wishes! :fl

Stand by it by all means. I have to assume you have never had to deal with pigeon flies on your pigeons, because if you had you would know that the research advise you have found is not effective.

Also the life cycle of this parasite is not correct how you describe. They don't even lay eggs to get knocked off the bird or fall off on shed feathers... they give birth do live young that are on the birds body from birth.
 

EggSighted4Life

Crossing the Road
6 Years
Apr 9, 2016
14,638
20,586
892
California's Redwood Coast
Stand by it by all means. I have to assume you have never had to deal with pigeon flies on your pigeons, because if you had you would know that the research advise you have found is not effective.

Also the life cycle of this parasite is not correct how you describe. They don't even lay eggs to get knocked off the bird or fall off on shed feathers... they give birth do live young that are on the birds body from birth.
In some areas, people have misused the permethrin causing resistance by some parasites. But according to all the information I read, it IS effective against pigeon flies.

Yes, my first post was not accurate to the life cycle and after your post I LOOKED and found...
Eggs are hatched in uterus in the female and then three stages of larvae feed from milk glands (Harwood and James 1979). The larvae pupate and female flies deposit puparia in the substrate in or around pigeon nests (Arcoverde et al. 2009)

Which does NOT agree with your post that they stay ON the bird for the entire life cycle.

I do NOT discount your personal experience or that permethrin MIGHT not be effective in YOUR area... but all information points to being VERY effective against said parasite and I would darn sure be trying it, thinking MAYBE they was some user error or other factor that made it ineffective for YOU. I mean you said you don't treat any substrate. If you also didn't do a follow up, you never disrupted the life cycle and the next generation will have SOME resistance to said treatment. I will also note that I use a premixed one instead of concentrated so there is no room for user error mixing the wrong strength on MY part.

Here in the US Permethrin is used to treat even termites...effectively. The ONLY things it known not to be effective against (where it hasn't been misused) is systemic feeders that don't come to the surface such as scaly leg mites, or depluming mites.
 

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