Qwerty3159

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Now, that probably wouldn't but I bet a Mexican Hairless would be just fine.
I wouldn't mind having a Xolo at all. The Chinese Cresteds aren't for me, though.
1600198409730.png


Also, BP: the enlarged wattles are definitely a trait selectively bred (just like the enlarged skin around the eyes in some breeds) but I'm not sure what purpose it serves or if its just cosmetic. I've heard that in some popular strains of Racing Homer the ones with the bigger wattles do better but I think its coincidence over correlation. At any rate, your ferals probably wont grow a bigger wattle because the size seems more or less determined at birth. Are you planning on letting your ferals interbeed with your other birds? I wonder how the phenotype of the cross would be.
1600198590613.png
 

Pyxis

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alright, sorry guys... those dogs are ugly! I'm sure they are loving, but still, an ugly inbred pooch! no thank you!
You probably don't like Xoloitzcuintlis or American Hairless Terriers either then, I'm guessing. Or Sphinx cats?

Not a fan of the Powder Puff Chinese Crested I shared a picture of either?

I love them all :love
 

Serin

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I didnt see any bands? Was it domestic? My opinion would change if it is a domestic one, as I would have wanted him to rehome it, or keep it.
They're all domestic, as the only wild pigeons live on the sea cliffs off the coast of Europe. Even the most boring blue bar bridge-dwelling pigeon is not like a wild bird, it's descended from domesticated captive animals, like a feral dog. And like a feral dog, it can survive by itself, but not especially well. Both species outside human care live short lives, have high parasite loads, are generally malnutritioned and don't really have the instincts to live in the "wild", so they can only survive around human settlement and depend on human scraps/farmed crops.
 
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Also, BP: the enlarged wattles are definitely a trait selectively bred (just like the enlarged skin around the eyes in some breeds) but I'm not sure what purpose it serves or if its just cosmetic. I've heard that in some popular strains of Racing Homer the ones with the bigger wattles do better but I think its coincidence over correlation. At any rate, your ferals probably wont grow a bigger wattle because the size seems more or less determined at birth. Are you planning on letting your ferals interbeed with your other birds? I wonder how the phenotype of the cross would be.
okay, good to know. lots of racers have big wattles, i figured it was just a "manlier" pigeon. haha. i currently dont have ferals. i did have two, but they were lost on a loft fly when my OB's routed, im guessing they just were not capable of flying home from that distance, or, they found where they used to live... i doubt the second though, as both were caught off of the ground when only 25-28 days old.

No, i would never consider interbreeding ferals with homers. it would have genetic benefits, but not flying or homing benefits, which is top on my list.

A interesting thing about ceres is, i have one male who last spring started to grow a large cere. he was one year old when it had a growth spurt. it ahs grown un-evenly, and one side is larger than the other side. its quite interesting. I'm curious if his offspring (i bred him, hes a good bird with good flying and homing capabilities, who is a black t check to boot).
You probably don't like Xoloitzcuintlis or American Hairless Terriers either then, I'm guessing. Or Sphinx cats?

Not a fan of the Powder Puff Chinese Crested I shared a picture of either?

I love them all :love
Can you speak in English? Oh...

:sick I'm sure they are loving, but sure aren't pretty! I like a robust, strong, healthy dog, or any animal. not a pethitic inbred pooch, or cat, or pigeon (NOT saying NN's are, they look awesome, with some strong genitics!). there's a reason i raise the 'thorough breds of the sky', they are ROBUST, STRONG, and HEALTHY! :thumbsup
 

Qwerty3159

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I understand your point, but if I may:

Feral means a domestic animal that has returned to a wild or semi wild state ;), so even feral animals born to feral parents are descended from some domestic ancestor. So any feral animal, be it a cat, dog, horse, or pigeon, can still be classified as a domestic animal. The feral term is used to differentiate between domestic animals being cared for and those living in the wild.
 
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I understand your point, but if I may:

Feral means a domestic animal that has returned to a wild or semi wild state ;), so even feral animals born to feral parents are descended from some domestic ancestor. So any feral animal, be it a cat, dog, horse, or pigeon, can still be classified as a domestic animal. The feral term is used to differentiate between domestic animals being cared for and those living in the wild.
That makes a lot more sense!! Thanks qwerty!
 

biophiliac

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So here’s a question for all of you with ferals in your flock, do your ferals look similar to your homers, or do they have that feral “look” I described earlier, like this guy: View attachment 2334818

It’s worth noting that this is quite close to the appearance of the truly wild rock pigeon. A similar example can be seen in parts of the world with large feral dog populations, where over many generations they revert back to a dingo-like appearance.
View attachment 2334820
My ferals have that look. Rounder head with a prominent forehead, dark orange eyes, sharp narrow beak, a bit smaller overall, ...

I understand your point, but if I may:

Feral means a domestic animal that has returned to a wild or semi wild state ;), so even feral animals born to feral parents are descended from some domestic ancestor. So any feral animal, be it a cat, dog, horse, or pigeon, can still be classified as a domestic animal. The feral term is used to differentiate between domestic animals being cared for and those living in the wild.
Well put! :thumbsup
 

Pyxis

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I like a robust, strong, healthy dog, or any animal. not a pethitic inbred pooch, or cat, or pigeon (NOT saying NN's are, they look awesome, with some strong genitics!). there's a reason i raise the 'thorough breds of the sky', they are ROBUST, STRONG, and HEALTHY! :thumbsup
They're really not much more inbred than any other breed. It's just a gene that's been propagated because people liked it. Honestly, pugs and bulldogs and all the brachiocephalic breeds are way worse off than these guys. At least the hairless breeds can breathe, lol.

" The Xoloitzcuintli's 'primitive' temperament (very high intelligence, sensitivity, high energy, inquisitiveness, strong hunting, and social instincts) is apparent because the breed's temperament was not modified overall by selective breeding in their native history in Mexico. This has also ensured a sturdy physical nature and vigorous health generally innate in both coated and uncoated Xolos."

Now, Xolos and American Hairlesses aren't on this chart, but you can see that when they studied the DNA of many breeds, Chinese Cresteds were actually less inbred than a lot of breeds, like Rhodesian Ridgebacks, Cocker Spaniels, Shetland Sheepdogs, Irish Wolfhounds, Bloodhounds, Dobermans, Collies, etc etc.

They're still fairly high up the list of inbreeding, but dogs I'd bet you'd not consider 'inbred' are higher than them, like the ones I named above :) Heck, they're only one place higher than German Shepherds.
 

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