post your chicken coop pictures here!

Discussion in 'Coop & Run - Design, Construction, & Maintenance' started by chickenlover237, Nov 10, 2011.

  1. vehve

    vehve The Token Finn

    Yeah, if she keeps scratching the mesh would do nasty damage. The cattle mats are designed to withstand cow hooves, so I thought it might be something to look into, but of course the old rule of "If it ain't broke, don't fix it" is always a good one...
     
    1 person likes this.
  2. Sylvester017

    Sylvester017 Overrun With Chickens

    7,063
    1,073
    350
    Nov 29, 2012
    So. Calif.
    We've been tarping our little feed-store-purchased 4x6 coop for 3 years now. It has a roof material sheeting but it's a flat roof and the rain water pools on the flat roof (who builds flat coop roofs anymore?) Even though its mostly a decent design the whole thing is cheaply built and 3 of the 4 walls is open wire. We keep most of the coop tarped 24/7 because it protects the cheap wood from sun or rain damage until sometime in the future when we can replace with a quality coop. We get a new tarp cover every 6 months since sun and rain really wears out tarp - but better than having the coop absorb the damages. At night we completely tarp the coop leaving open ventilation at the bottom on one side.

    Our hens don't use the roosting bar. Our 3 hens sleep in the nestboxes because it's the only secluded area in the coop and the perch is not located higher than the nestbox ledge. Silkies often won't use a roost pole and will pile up on the floor. I'm glad my Silkies chose to use the nestboxes rather than the floor. For sleeping in nestboxes ours stay relatively clean of poop. If there is some poop we clean it out every morning and add more straw if needed. Once a month we clean out old straw, Poultry Protector spray (OMRI organic) all the nestbox crevices and corners, and then add clean straw. We also Poultry Protector spray the hens once a month (directions on label). This controls lice/mites in the nestboxes.

    One chickeneer had Silkies that refused to sleep anywhere except piled on the floor so she set up a large covered cat litterbox with straw and they started piling up inside the box rather than the floor. Chickens love seclusion. Even daytime our free-range hens will snooze/hide under their low lean-to's we set up, or the big doghouse we recycled, or under big rosebushes, or under the canopy we set up in the backyard.
     
  3. ezicash

    ezicash Chillin' With My Peeps

    102
    3
    61
    Jun 25, 2014
    [​IMG][​IMG]


    [​IMG][​IMG]
    I placed a tarp over the coop and part of the run to give them shade from the hot sun and protection from the rain. The run is a DIY from a first timer chick grandma - I wish I could make something that looked nicer but I am learning as I go. These are Rhode island Red Pullets
     
  4. charliethezero

    charliethezero Chillin' With My Peeps

    95
    6
    101
    May 10, 2009
    East central MN
    Here is my coop, 6'3"x6'. It's almost finished, a few minor details left to do. The run will be 18x6 feet including under the coop extending out the right side.[​IMG]

    [​IMG]
     
    2 people like this.
  5. Sylvester017

    Sylvester017 Overrun With Chickens

    7,063
    1,073
    350
    Nov 29, 2012
    So. Calif.
    Hi Bruce - very nice egg box with the round-hole entrance. That is the round entrances we have on each of our 3 individual nestboxes. Hens love seclusion so I'm not a fan of your open box but love your lidded one with the round hole. I love the round-hold entrance because it helps to keep some straw in the nestbox when the hens kick it around - especially that OCD Silkie of ours who will scratch til her toes bleed. Had to line the boxes with plexiglass to keep her from getting splinters. They have plenty of deep straw we add every day but the two OCD hens constantly kick it out. We re-homed one of the two OCD hens so now it's just the Silkie that throws the straw around and there's less being kicked out. I suppose it was good to re-home at least one of our OCD hens.

    You look to have more chickens than we do so our circumstances are dissimilar. We are down to 3 hens after rehoming a bully last weekend - she wasn't just a pushy broad - she was pulling out the beard of the Ameraucana and when there was no more beard left she started chasing the Silkies to pull out their crests. She came to maturity after her first broody period and being a LF started to get assertive in a damaging way and the non-combative Ameraucana and two smaller Silkies were not able to challenge her back in a fair fight and she got drunk with power! She is in an egg-laying flock now where there are older LF hens to put her in her place. Hated to lose her as she was a good layer.

    We're crossing our fingers that the Blue Wheaten Ameraucana stays non-combative since she is as good a layer if not better than a Leghorn. Until we got her I was giving up on LF egg-layers for our backyard flock - she is non-combative towards flockmates, friendly, seeks humans to talk to (and loudly), easy to handle/pickup/pet so easy for health checks, lays XL eggs at least 5-6x/week, and they're blue! From comparing notes with other chickeneers, these characteristics seem to prevail among Ameraucanas and EEs.

    Syl [​IMG]
     
  6. noXcuse

    noXcuse Just Hatched

    4
    1
    10
    Jun 24, 2014
    I'm still working on it. And yes, that is a shower drain plumbed in. I poured a concrete floor inside with it sloped to the center. I can open up the big door and rinse it out. I'm also in the process of plumbing feeders and waterers. I'm trying to figure out how to make the waterer freeze-proof. I'm thinking an insulated 5 gallon water cooler with a heated dog dish.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    Sent from my DROID RAZR HD using Tapatalk
     
    1 person likes this.
  7. Sylvester017

    Sylvester017 Overrun With Chickens

    7,063
    1,073
    350
    Nov 29, 2012
    So. Calif.
    Our Buff Leghorn layed pink shelled eggs (pinkish on the interior of the shell also). If you're interested let me know and I'll contact the breeder to see if they're still breeding them (from the Danne J. Honour line). Mr. Honour has bred his Buff Legs to finally lay white eggs but my breeder who previously bought birds from him still has the pink egg layers. My breeder shipped two 11-12 week old juveniles from the East Coast to the West Coast overnight. Birds were priced reasonable but the shipping cost was high.

    Our Black Silkie lays glossy pink (pinkish on the interior shell also) and the Partridge Silkie lays matte very pale pinkish-cream tinted shells. Unless a Silkie breeder can verify their line of birds lays pink the majority of Silkies lay a very light pink-tinted or cream colored egg. We got lucky with our Black Silkie laying the pinkish eggs.

    Brown egg layers have white inside their shells (like Marans) but truly pink eggs have a pale pink inside wall as well. The pink pigment seems to be throughout the shell whereas truly brown egg layers have a white shell that is coated in brown pigment on the outer shell and the brown can be washed off. Our pink and pale-tinted eggs will not wash off color.

    As for color in photos they always seem to show darker on these threads. Our Ameraucana lays a pale blue but the camera we shot with shows it a deeper brighter blue than in reality. One of the reasons I hate to post pics regarding colors.

    I personally like the 3" fence rail for perches since the birds favor the rounded edges on a square-ish pole. We had one in redwood going through two cinderblock holes that the chickens loved using in the yard. I doubt I could talk an Amish manufacturer to fashion one for us in one of their coops. I'm still researching coops or trying to find a local builder. Sometimes mfr coops have a good design but sh***y materials or else there's quality materials but utilizing a lousy design (like nestboxes built outside the coop LOL).
     
    Last edited: Jun 25, 2014
  8. Sylvester017

    Sylvester017 Overrun With Chickens

    7,063
    1,073
    350
    Nov 29, 2012
    So. Calif.
    Your fence will keep the chickens inside but it won't keep the predators outside. Anyone else going to chime in on this one?
    Nice attempt to make a roomy run and A+ for effort as I love the growing number of chickeneers on this thread but there appears too many security issues with this particular setup in a rural wooded setting.
     
  9. araminta37

    araminta37 Out Of The Brooder

    77
    1
    48
    Apr 7, 2014
    we have been making sure to lock them up at dusk
     
  10. Sylvester017

    Sylvester017 Overrun With Chickens

    7,063
    1,073
    350
    Nov 29, 2012
    So. Calif.
    I use tarp over our 4x6 feed-store coop 24/7. Protects from sun and rain damage since our wood is cheap particle wood. Since our coop has 3 open-wire walls we completely tarp the coop except for ventilation on one side. It's good to use the poultry netting from aerial predators but the fence doesn't look strong enough to keep out ground predators. I'm sure you'll invest in more security as you go along. For pre-fab that is one of the cuter coops we looked at a couple years ago. Now if it only was about 3x bigger and stronger-built for our yard!

    Think about stronger 1/2 inch hardwire fencing. Even in city neighborhoods the raccoons, possums, loose pet snakes, and stray mutts are a threat to chickens. I've been house-sitting my daughter's place and a raccoon got into the yard and spread trash all over the place. Her dog killed a possum who scampered into the yard in broad daylight! I'm glad it wasn't a skunk! In the afternoon I saw a very big coyote nosing around outside the iron bar fence. Night critters don't hunt just at night any more and it doesn't take them long to sniff where the chickens are!
     

BackYard Chickens is proudly sponsored by