post your chicken coop pictures here!

Discussion in 'Coop & Run - Design, Construction, & Maintenance' started by chickenlover237, Nov 10, 2011.

  1. Sylvester017

    Sylvester017 Overrun With Chickens

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    So I'm not doing a repeat read my post #3910. Security has to be during the daytime as well. But after all this thread's experienced advice it's still your choice.

    I like that you got a one-breed flock of RIRs. Because they are assertive and a bigger dual-purpose breed they tend to be alphas in a mixed LF flock - but when they are an all-RIR flock the squabbles will be equal with fair challenges. Not to mention the benefit all those frequently layed XL eggs!
     
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  2. TherryChicken

    TherryChicken Overrun With Chickens

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    Here is an updated picture of ours..
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    all the panels are done, as well as the floring, now just to get it up and start working on the housing, nesting boxes, and roof
     
  3. TherryChicken

    TherryChicken Overrun With Chickens

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    [​IMG]
    there are 22 panels plus door. They are each 3 feet wide and 7 feet tall
     
  4. bruceha2000

    bruceha2000 Chicken Obsessed

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    I showed the coop to my wife because, let's face it, yours isn't in the running for a "built as cheaply as I could" prize.
    Then I found something to suggest as an improvement. I presume you are planning to put some material on the floor such as shavings or hay. You want to put a 3" to 4" barrier across the door trim. Otherwise the door won't be able to close as the girls drag stuff through it (or toss it there scratching, etc) and also get stuck in the channel. And if the door doesn't fully close, the predators can open it. You can make it easy to remove like the roosts so cleaning everything out will not require lifting it over the barrier.

    You are making them sound even more appealing. Maybe I'll be able to find some when my "what, broody AGAIN!" Faverolles and Partridge Chantecler (the ones that lay in the upper end of small to the really lower end of medium) kick the oyster shell bucket. No freezer camp here, just social security until natural end of life. The Cubalayas lay small to ALMOST medium but they are CUUUUTTTTTEEEE (channeling my daughter) so I will have to replace them when they die. I have to agree, they are nice looking birds and don't bother the others at all.

    So, please tell me that yours don't go broody otherwise they are off the list no matter how pink the eggs.
    Correction, the hole is not round but egg shaped. I have to point that out because it is my SOLE attempt at "artistic flair", I'm a function over form guy [​IMG]

    Oddly, only the Anconas and one Australorp use the closed community box. All the others use the open "3 nest stalls" box. I guess my chickens aren't as interested in privacy.

    My Anconas have pecked the muffs and all other neck feathers out of the EE and Faverolles. Won't get them again. Decent layers and OK with people but not so nice with the other chickens. If I decide to get more chickens at a later time, I might make another coop. One for the "nice girls" and one for the "naughty girls".[​IMG] Then I have to figure out how to keep them apart when they are outside all day.

    Looks like good work so far. Remember the caveats on chicken wire as "protection". And if that is an "Arrow" style staple gun being used to put up the wire, you might as well hire a fox to guard the run because they pull out really easily, just yank on the wire and you will see.
    Add your location to your profile and people can make useful suggestions with regard to winter water. Winter in Georgia is a whole different game than winter in the frigid north. There are many threads on the topic here on BYC and there is definitely NOT a "right" answer.

    I would think that would be an easy mod for a coop builder. The rails are found almost everywhere and making or buying wall brackets to hold the round ends (for easy removal) would be easy as well.

    Bruce
     
  5. ezicash

    ezicash Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Yes i agree about security. I do have a fenced in back yard and have 4 cats and a dog. But I have had racoons/possums come over the fence so I am scared to death they might be attractive to my chicks. I just ordered another runner for my chicks so i can have a double layer of protection and used cloth wire around half my run and will replace the other half with cloth wire and try to make a roof over the run. So much work for a first time grandma farmer but one day at a time.
     
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  6. noXcuse

    noXcuse Just Hatched

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    Thanks for the thoughts on the staple gun. I only used that to put the wire in place. I have 1x6 that I'm trimming the whole thing with. The trim will be screwed on with deck screws, sandwiching the chicken wire between it and the 2x4 frame. And the screws will be inside the octagons of the wire. Already planned it out man.

    Sent from my DROID RAZR HD using Tapatalk
     
  7. Sylvester017

    Sylvester017 Overrun With Chickens

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    * Have been trying to think of a pink egg breed that DOESN'T go broody but nothing comes to mind. Our pink egg Buff Leghorn went broody but her pink egg sister never did - go figure? Faverolles lay pinkish eggs but several reviews say they are too docile for a LF mixed flock. Some EEs can lay pink eggs but mostly you get the green/mint egg layers in EEs. My friend has an EE that lays pink but it's not common. Ameraucanas and EEs are not noted to go broody but I've read reports and seems about 50% EEs will go broody. Of course some Silkies lay pink but then they are an extremely broody bunch. Out of the 4 hens we had this past year only the Blue Wheaten Ameraucana didn't go broody.
    * Sorry about your egg-hole entrance but I said "round" since oval/egg-shaped is classified as round as opposed to a "square" entrance [​IMG] Keep up the artwork - I do appreciate artistic touches!
    * Our opposite chickens again, Bruce. Yours like the open stalls and mine prefer seclusion [​IMG]

    * Anconas are classified as Mediterranean class like Minorcas, Leghorns, Andalusians, White Faced Black Spanish, etc. I find the Mediterranean class of fowl independent, smarter than the average, active, skittish, alert, good foragers and easy on the feed bill, non-broody, excellent white egg layers, AND assertive - no shrinking violets here so would not put them around gentle breeds like Faverolles, Ameraucanas, EEs, or smaller gentler LF like Dominiques, Bredas, etc. I LOVE Leghorns for so many reasons but I've learned a hard lesson about Mediterranean birds and will never mix these with other classes of fowl again. Mediterraneans mixed together would be fine but only with each other without other classes mixed into the flock. It really makes it easier to keep breeds the same sizes and temperaments.

    * As for chocolate layers like Marans and Welsummers - too many cautionary reviews that it's hit-and-miss getting a really dark egg and in our experience and our friend's experience the eggs were reasonably brown but not chocolate like those doctored website photos show. Not to mention that ours and our friend's Marans were sneaky pecky pickers on the other breeds.

    * Once I get really serious about the next coop I am planning to throw out my custom ideas (i.e. redwood rail for one) and see what the coop builders are willing to modify. I've already found one Amish company that is willing to search for tilt-out outer windows instead of interior-opening slider windows and another willing to build the perches flat-side-up. It won't be cheap to get a custom coop but the mortgage is paid off in a year and should be feasible then. Before the coop we want to put up a permanent block wall fence first. And our 15-year-old Jeep is falling apart and needs a new companion vehicle parked next to it in our driveway LOL.
     
  8. Melabella

    Melabella Overrun With Chickens

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    Last edited: Jun 25, 2014
  9. Sylvester017

    Sylvester017 Overrun With Chickens

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    So. Calif.
    The hardwire will always be the costliest part of coop building and the larger the run area the more expensive it becomes. But really saves us finding a torn fence, shredded chickens, and scattered feathers all over the yard. When my daughter came home from vacation she was amazed at how many wild animals I saw in and around her yard while she was gone. For being night critters I caught them hunting in broad daylight! The dog killed the 'possum, the raccoon tipped over the heavy trash barrel and scattered it all over the yard, wild rabbits were coming onto the lawn to eat grass, and a very large coyote was stalking the back iron bar fence. I smelled skunk but never saw it in the yard and I was fortunate not to see the neighborhood's resident Bobcat or have a rattlesnake come into the yard. My daughter lives in a regular city neighborhood but there is a large wooded area behind their tract of homes. One year a Mountain Lion and a Bear were spotted. I told her I was almost afraid to step out of the house for all the wildlife she has around her place.

    For security I noticed a lot of chickeneers completely enclosing and roofing over smaller coops for double protection. Sounds costly so take little baby steps toward fortifying like Fort Knox. Wooded areas harbor a lot of small but deadly predators to chickens.
     
    Last edited: Jun 26, 2014
  10. vehve

    vehve The Token Finn

    Did you connect this to your regular plumbing? If you did, I'm foreseeing a lot of plumber bills in your future, I would be really careful with washing down any bedding. Also, I think the poop will pretty quickly clog up the grate on the drain. Then you might be stuck with a nice poop soup in the coop.
     

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