Preparing to Travel

Discussion in 'Managing Your Flock' started by Matanah Meadows, Feb 3, 2014.

  1. Matanah Meadows

    Matanah Meadows Out Of The Brooder

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    Oct 11, 2012
    Hi,

    We are planning on moving our flock of 19 hens to an entirely different location 4 hours away. Is there any natural supplement we can give to help with the stress of the transition beside ACV and yoghurt?

    Thanks in advance!
     
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  2. foreverlearning

    foreverlearning Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Aug 4, 2013
    I like this stuff called gro gel that hatcheries sell. You can make something very similar for you birds and it will reduce mess for them to have fluids. At your farm supply they will have some sort of vitamin supplement. I would make a jello with unflavored jello, water, and the added vitamins. The vitamins help reduce stress, the jello turns liquid with the body heat in the crop (fluids), and there is less mess from the water source (jello). You can do flavored if you want but if you choose red (cherry or strawberry) do not freak out if you open up the back and see red on their beaks and wattles. The first time all I had was red and I freaked out trying to find the bleeder and only after bathing all of them did I realize it was from the jello dye.
     
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  3. Matanah Meadows

    Matanah Meadows Out Of The Brooder

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    Oct 11, 2012
    Thanks! Great idea. What vitamins would you suggest? Also, would they be poultry specific or a general livestock type?
     
  4. foreverlearning

    foreverlearning Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I use Durvet Vitamins & Electrolytes: All classes of livestock & Poultry from Tractor Supply. I usually have this on hand for insanely hot summer days here. Sav A Chik is cheap and works well (comes in small packets instead of large bottle). You want something that is water soluble and has either poultry, cows, or goats on it somewhere. 1/2 a packet of sav a chik is enough for one box of jello.
     
  5. Matanah Meadows

    Matanah Meadows Out Of The Brooder

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    Oct 11, 2012
    Thanks! How much jello would you allocate per chicken? Say, I have 5 chickens per dog crate for a 4 hour trip...

    Also, any special considerations or ways to reduce stress in transit since they are all laying? Just have a thick layer of shavings? Should I keep them covered or would it make them too hot? I plan on having them in dog crates/kennels in the back of my covered (shell) truck.

    Would they feel more at ease if they were separated from each other (kennels subdivided) or have them be able to be next to each other. FYI, most of them all get along with no feather picking or negative dominant behavior. Or, it doesn't really matter?

    THanks!
     
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  6. foreverlearning

    foreverlearning Chillin' With My Peeps

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    One box each crate should be more then enough for the trip. Covering them would depend on the temps. It would reduce stress to have it dark in the crate but you don't want them to get too hot. If it is less then 65 outside it would be completely safe to cover them. Anything over that would be up to how well your chickens can handle it. If it is too warm you could also cover the top and sides of the crate and leave the door uncovered. This will keep it darker then normal while still keeping it cooler. You want enough room for all of them to lay down and be comfortable as they will be laying down most of the trip. If they all get along well they would prefer to at least be paired up. A thick layer of shavings would be enough for bedding. I use towels under the crates to reduce vibrations from the truck. They don't need food for that short of a trip but when you get to where you are going and have them set up you'll want to give them food so they know they are safe there. Be prepared for them to reduce laying for a few days. With such a mild mannered flock they may not reduce laying, but some chickens do when traveling.
     
  7. Matanah Meadows

    Matanah Meadows Out Of The Brooder

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    Oct 11, 2012
    Thanks for all that great info!

    If there is a choice about arriving during the day or arriving after dark, which would be the least stressful?
     
  8. foreverlearning

    foreverlearning Chillin' With My Peeps

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    It would be less stressful if you traveled during the day with them covered up. That way both you and them have a chance to get used to the new surroundings.
     

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