Pullet with Yellow Nasal Discharge, no other symptoms

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by Gingerweavers, Oct 3, 2016.

  1. Gingerweavers

    Gingerweavers Out Of The Brooder

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    Just noticed a pullet with yellow nasal discharge. Separated her from the flock. No bubbly eyes or wheezing. She is eating and drinking fine. No lethargy.

    How do we discern if this is coryza or a regular respiratory infection that can be easily cleared up. We will be out of town and will have a house-sitter so we are worried to leave her with less experience chicken people.
     
  2. Wyorp Rock

    Wyorp Rock Overrun With Chickens Premium Member

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    Most all respiratory illnesses/disease have nasal discharge. Usually the differentiation of Infectious Coryza from something like Mycoplasma, Infectious Bronchitis, or one of the many other contagious illnesses would be a foul smell.

    Some respiratory illnesses may be a little easier to treat, but all are contagious. All make the affected bird and those exposed, carriers of the illness, regardless if they ever show signs of illness.

    It really depends on what she has, to determine how to treat.
    For Infectious Coryza sulfa drugs may be best treatment. For Mycoplasma or Bronchitis use Tylan or Oxytetracycline.
    Antibiotics will help with any secondary infections, but won't cure.

    http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/ps044
     
    Last edited: Oct 3, 2016
  3. Gingerweavers

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    I've read that if it's Coryza, we need to cull her. How long should we give it to figure out if that's what it is?
     
  4. Wyorp Rock

    Wyorp Rock Overrun With Chickens Premium Member

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    You mention Infectious Coryza in both your posts. What unique signs/symptoms makes you think this is Coryza over another respiratory illness?
    Has she been exposed to other birds with Coryza?

    Some people do cull if they have Infectious Coryza or any one of the other contagious respiratory illnesses. It depends on your chicken keeping goals. You would not want to sell/give away chicks, chickens or hatching eggs.

    If you do cull her, have a necropsy performed, this will give you useful information.

    http://www.thepoultrysite.com/diseaseinfo/82/infectious-coryza/
    http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/ps044
     
  5. Gingerweavers

    Gingerweavers Out Of The Brooder

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    Your info that coryza is marked by a foul odor leads me to believe it may be coryza. Non of our other 12 birds have exhibited symptoms. We haven't introduced any new hems since the beginning of September. I'm hoping it'a different respiratory illness. My husband mentioned that her discharge does in fact smell "off" but not like the rotting death smell I've read on other threads.

    For now she is isolated from the other hens until we can figure out what's going on. I plan to get some antibiotics after work, but want to be treating as best as I can with what little info I have.
     
  6. Wyorp Rock

    Wyorp Rock Overrun With Chickens Premium Member

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    Keeping her separated is a good idea.
    Make sure she is staying well hydrated and eating. Clear any mucous that you see and practice biosecurity between taking care of her and the rest of your flock.

    Keep us posted on her progress.
     
  7. Gingerweavers

    Gingerweavers Out Of The Brooder

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    So, oddly enough, when I got home today and checked on her, her mucus was dry and clear. No other symptoms. When I put her back in the run to get some food/water/to observe, the runny nose came back but clear. There is a slight odor but not the rotting death smell. We went and bought a dog crate and are keeping her separated in the garage. I got electrolytes/probiotics for her water. Appetite, poop, water intake are all good. I'd hate to give her antibiotics if she doesn't need them. Could she have chicken allergies to something in our run or coop area??? I've read about sensitivities to pine shavings..IDK. We just need to decide what to do about Mesa because we are leaving town and will have a house sitter [​IMG]
     
  8. Wyorp Rock

    Wyorp Rock Overrun With Chickens Premium Member

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    Any mold anywhere - feed, bedding, etc.?

    Chicken don't really have allergies, nor do they get colds. Extremely dusty, moldy/mildew, fungus in the environment can cause illness.
    Nasal discharge is usually associated with respiratory disease. Depending on what it is, mucous may be the only symptom that you see.
     
  9. Gingerweavers

    Gingerweavers Out Of The Brooder

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    No issues in the coop. It's large, cleaned weekly. We did just have a terrible round of Santa Ana winds that cause extreme heat, wind, and dryness. San Diego is usually mild, but we had temps of 105 with 0% humidity. I wonder if it could be that? If nasal discharge is a sign of infection, I guess we should do antibiotics. I'd just hate to medicate all of them if not necessary.
     
  10. Wyorp Rock

    Wyorp Rock Overrun With Chickens Premium Member

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    I wouldn't medicate them all. Just the one(s) that are showing any signs of illness.
    Antibiotics will only treat any secondary infection(s).

    If she is eating, drinking, pooping and still active, then play it by ear. If she has something like Infectious Bronchitis or Mycoplasma, antibiotics may help clear up the mucous, but the virus/illness will have to run it's course.
     

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