questions on composting...

Discussion in 'Random Ramblings' started by kennedyscochins, Jan 24, 2011.

  1. kennedyscochins

    kennedyscochins Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I plan to clean out my coop this spring (deep litter method) and start a compost pile for my garden. I know I can't use the compost this spring on the garden because it will be too "hot". This is what I am planning to do and want to know if it will work. I plan to put the pine shaving and chicken poop in a big pile and then add the grass clippings from my yard. Turn it all once/week. Does this sound like it will work? How often would I add grass clippings since I will only have one coop cleaning to add to it? Do I put it in a bin or just make a big pile somewhere close to the garden (to get to it easily for the next garden planting)?

    Any suggestions would be great. I would LOVE to see pictures if anyone has any of their compost piles. I know that sounds crazy, but if it has to be in a bin, I would like to see that too.

    Thanks in advance!
     
  2. Organics North

    Organics North Chillin' With My Peeps

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    It sounds like you are on the right track.!

    Hot composting is the way to go IMO..[​IMG]

    Google it or check BYC sister site: theeasygarden.com

    Thing to keep in mind is the ratio of "brown"/Carbon to "green"/nitrogen items in the pile. The ratio is 30 parts brown to 1 part green.

    I find the pine shavings and chicken poo out of the coop is at just about the right ratio. I would save up until you have a cubic yard of material then build your pile and it should heat up to 150F, then turn it frequently. It is done when it stops heating and smells "good". It should be ready for use in late summer.

    Grass clippings are "green" things like dead leaves are a "brown" chicken poo is a "green" pine shavings are a "brown".

    My pile is about 16 feet in diameter and starts out 9 feet tall. (I use a tractor to turn it..)

    ON
     
  3. gmendoza

    gmendoza Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Raise redwoyms(wrigglers) to do your composting for you for next year.Just cool down the chicken poop( in a 5 gal bucket) then feed it to them.My worms love poop and the pine shavings.
     
  4. Steve_of_sandspoultry

    Steve_of_sandspoultry Overrun With Chickens

    If you have a way to work it into the soil well you can use it "raw". There are alot of factory chicken and turkey houses in our area and this time of year we start to see huge piles (dump truck loads) out in the fields where the growers are cleaning out the houses. They spread it over the fields and disc it in. In our garden I have been spreading it all winter when we clean out our chicken houses and then running the tiller thru it. As long as you don't have big clumps it breaks down in no time.

    Steve
     
  5. kennedyscochins

    kennedyscochins Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Quote:This may be silly but do the worms hurt the garden when you pour the compost in?
     
  6. gmendoza

    gmendoza Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Quote:This may be silly but do the worms hurt the garden when you pour the compost in?

    Not at all. they aerate and help eat protozoa and their"castings' or poop are used for gardens.Its a plus!!!
     
  7. HEChicken

    HEChicken Overrun With Chickens

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    My Coop
    Quote:Oh my goodness no! They are the best thing FOR your garden. On the grass clippings....the best thing really is to allow these to mulch directly into your lawn. Most lawnmowers these days mulch as a matter of course so if you just take off the bag, the work will be done for you. Don't worry about it being unsightly - you will not even be able to see the bits of grass on the lawn, either immediately after mowing or in the days to come.
     
  8. woodmort

    woodmort Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I've used the deep litter method for 25 year (actually before anyone told me it had a name) and what I do is dump the manure/pine shaving right on the garden when I do the yearly cleaning in April before I till it. It usually gets rained on--sometimes even snow--before I take my big Pony Troy-Built to it and rototill it in real well. Then I plant. Haven't had a problem with fertilizer burn. However, if , for some reason--usually when I clean the brooder area-- I clean during the growing season, I will pile it to compost or spread it on an place where I plan on, at some point, building a garden. It is a good idea to put it downwind of the house when you do this and/or cover it with grass clippings.
     
    Last edited: Jan 25, 2011
  9. HHandbasket

    HHandbasket The Chickeneer

    Quote:We have a pile AND a compost tumbler bin. We put in grass clippings, kitchen scraps (peelings, etc., that the chickens don't eat). We try turning our compost pile once a week, but it's too big now so we just keep it wet, turn the surface, and when we need compost, we take it from the bottom where it's been cooking and brewing since this time last year. We just got one of the raised beds composted, and I swear I think this is our best compost yet!
     

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