Serama pairs same coop?

MichelleKing

Songster
Aug 25, 2018
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I have a two male serama chicks and two unrelated female chicks. One of the males has really paired off with one of the females. My question is, I want to keep them all as house chickens and in the same coop in my house. So two females and two males, their adopted mama Silkie, all in there together. The coop is huge and has plenty of fun activities for them (perches, arches, etc.). Will the roos fight or will they be just fine? They don't fight now and are together, they are 7 weeks old. Both crowing. I feel like they will be fine but I don't have the experience to tell for sure.
 

rebrascora

Free Ranging
5 Years
Feb 14, 2014
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Your problem may be that the females get over mated by two adolescent males with raging hormones once they hit 4-5 months old, even if the boys do get along together. Having just 3 females with 2 young males is not a good situation. It would definitely be a good idea to have a separate cage on hand to remove at least one of them, if things turn pear shaped.
Can't begin to imagine having two crowing males in the house. I hope you don't have near neighbours! They will not restrict their crowing to daylight hours you know! I don't mind them outside but in the house would be more than I could tolerate and with having two they may compete with each other for who has the last word, so it can go on.... and on..... and the volume will increase as they get older, so whilst it may be cute now, it might become ear piercing in a confined space in a few months! Good luck!
 

MichelleKing

Songster
Aug 25, 2018
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Ohio
Pics, please?

You tell us, after they've been in there awhile. It could go either way.
serama pile.jpg


the two roosters I want to keep are in the middle, to the right of the middle, and then one of the females is on the far right.

I feel like they'll be fine. Just want experienced people to tell me if they've had success with this before I sell all my roosters save one.
 

MichelleKing

Songster
Aug 25, 2018
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Ohio
Your problem may be that the females get over mated by two adolescent males with raging hormones once they hit 4-5 months old, even if the boys do get along together. Having just 3 females with 2 young males is not a good situation. It would definitely be a good idea to have a separate cage on hand to remove at least one of them, if things turn pear shaped.
Can't begin to imagine having two crowing males in the house. I hope you don't have near neighbours! They will not restrict their crowing to daylight hours you know! I don't mind them outside but in the house would be more than I could tolerate and with having two they may compete with each other for who has the last word, so it can go on.... and on..... and the volume will increase as they get older, so whilst it may be cute now, it might become ear piercing in a confined space in a few months! Good luck!



Hmmmm interesting. Yes I did consider the overmating portion. Tough call. I have 6 other fully grown females but they arent micro and only 3 are bantam. So the large ladies might not have their little serama advances if I put them outside with the rest of the ladies.

I heard a lot of people keep the serama as house pets and that their crows are very mild. Is this not your experience?
 

rebrascora

Free Ranging
5 Years
Feb 14, 2014
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I have not personally kept Seramas but I have other bantams and plenty of roosters and could not envision keeping them in the house. Only you will know how it works out but my point was more that roosters competitively crow, so one will crow and set the other off. Two inside the house may make the situation significantly worse than just a single rooster. I know my outdoor roosters will crow at the least disturbance, even in the dead of night, so hearing someone get up in the middle of the night to use the bathroom might set them away. You can only try it and see, but have a fall back plan and let us know how it goes. Good luck
 

MichelleKing

Songster
Aug 25, 2018
207
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Ohio
I have not personally kept Seramas but I have other bantams and plenty of roosters and could not envision keeping them in the house. Only you will know how it works out but my point was more that roosters competitively crow, so one will crow and set the other off. Two inside the house may make the situation significantly worse than just a single rooster. I know my outdoor roosters will crow at the least disturbance, even in the dead of night, so hearing someone get up in the middle of the night to use the bathroom might set them away. You can only try it and see, but have a fall back plan and let us know how it goes. Good luck

Ok I see what you mean. Yeah I have heard them crowing at all hours at the farm. They're pretty darn loud. Thanks for the insight I appreciate it!

I have buyers now but I dont know if I'll have buyers when they're grown so....probably just going to keep 1 male to the 3 females. Thanks!
 

aart

Chicken Juggler!
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I feel like they'll be fine. Just want experienced people to tell me if they've had success with this before I sell all my roosters save one.
I do have experience with multiple males...
...and was just curious to see your whole enclosure as I've contemplated having seramas kept inside.
 

sourland

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View attachment 1595078



I feel like they'll be fine. Just want experienced people to tell me if they've had success with this before I sell all my roosters save one.

There is no way that this question can be answered with any surety. Best guess is that eventually more than one cockerel will fight. Your decision to keep only one was probably the best for a variety of reasons.
 

WVduckchick

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I do keep seramas, and I've had groups go both ways also. Generally, I'd the males get along well, and will tolerate each other, better than most other breeds, in my experience. Usually one will become dominant, and the subordinate usually learns his place. But you really just never know until you try it.

As far as crowing, they are much less robust and lower volume than large fowl. I say they sound like dog squeaky toys. :D

Young one learning

this one is a little older. He actually doesn't crow much any more. I have other breeds crowing around him, he's just a quiet, laid back little dude.
 

MANNA-PRO

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