Sick and dying girls

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by jdevries02, Jun 18, 2019.

  1. jdevries02

    jdevries02 Hatching

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    Jun 18, 2019
    Des Moines, IA
    Hello everyone, I am new to this site, and going into my second year of raising chickens. I have a flock of 14 golden comet girls. About a month ago, I noticed one beginning to walk very slowly and her comb became very pale. It was difficult to tell if she was laying because theres so many. I assumed she had an egg stuck (her belly was swollen), so I was doing epsom salt baths, but unfortunately she passed. Well now almost two months later, I have another girl who has a red and inflamed rear end, and noticing poop sticking to her behind feathers. I again assumed she had an egg stuck (we recently added more calcium to their diet and they free range) so I have been soaking her. She has been like this for about a week, still eating and drinking, but continues to be reddened and poop. Well now I am noticing more girls having this, and I found another dead one without any other symptoms or anything. I am wondering if there is some sort of bacterial infection? All of their poop appears normal (not frothy or diarrhea). I have added some vitamins to their water, and also apple cider vinegar. I have attached a picture of what it looks like (sorry I know it is gross). I guess my question is should I treat the whole flock? Any other suggestions/advice would be very welcome, I am very distraught about my girls!
     

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  2. Eggcessive

    Eggcessive Enabler

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    Welcome to BYC. Sorry that you are dealing with this problem. The picture appears to be a prolapsed vent, and it has been pecked/damaged by other chickens.

    The first hen sounded like she may have had a reproductive issue, such as internal laying or egg yolk peritonitis, and they can also have ascites or water belly. It is common in laying hens, and especially in golden comets. These chickens are great layers, but they can have laying difficulties such as egg binding, prolapsed vents, and EYP.

    How big is your coop and run? Do they get outside to free range? Overcrowding can be a cause of vent pecking. That could be the reason for the reddened vents. Some may peck to the point of killing. They need at least 16% protein, and some use a feed with 20% along with providing crushed oyster shell for a calcium source. Getting outside to free range may help them not pick on each other, and they can get some of the things they need in their diets that way.
     
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  3. Trux

    Trux Crowing

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    If you have another chicken pass, go have a necropsy done. Bag the body and keep it refrigerated, DO NOT freeze it. Then find your closest state lab and contact them. This will give you insight into what you are dealing with and may help you save the rest of your chickens. http://www.poultrydvm.com/labs.php This is a directory where you can find a lb in your state. Others here may have a better directory or more extensive one they can point you to but this will get you started
     
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  4. jdevries02

    jdevries02 Hatching

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    Jun 18, 2019
    Des Moines, IA

    Thank you for your response! My girls do free range. The coop they sleep in at night is a little less than 100 sq ft and their run is about 300 sq feet. I do feed them a 16% laying feed, and have recently added oyster shells as additional calcium source, as well as kitchen scraps.

    I actually had their droppings checked today and was told they have eggs, and to deworm them. Could that also be making her vent irritated? I was looking into different de-worming options (if you have anything you have used successfully I would appreciate the advice :) ) Thank you again for your reply!
     
  5. jdevries02

    jdevries02 Hatching

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    Jun 18, 2019
    Des Moines, IA
    Thank you for your reply, I am hoping I do not have another one pass (fingers crossed) but if I do a necropsy may be necessary.
     
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  6. AmyJane725

    AmyJane725 Crowing

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    What sort of worms were they confirmed to have?
     
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  7. Celticdragonfly

    Celticdragonfly Crowing

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    How old are the chickens?
     
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  8. jdevries02

    jdevries02 Hatching

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    Jun 18, 2019
    Des Moines, IA

    All they told me was they found eggs, so to treat. They recomended Backyard Chicken zyfend a (which after researching doesnt necessarily treat worms just prevents them). Obviously this vet doesnt deal with chickens it seems.
     
  9. jdevries02

    jdevries02 Hatching

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    Jun 18, 2019
    Des Moines, IA
    They are 2 we got them as chicks.
     
  10. Wyorp Rock

    Wyorp Rock Enabler

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    How is the one with the prolapse (first post) have you been able to correct that?
    It would be good to know what type of worm eggs the vet found so you know what to treat for. I agree with you, the Zyfend is not what you want to use. You want a dewormer.
    Since you don't know what they are, then I would use either Fenbendazole (Safeguard) or Albendazole (Valbazen).
    You can find Fenbendazole at Tractor Supply in the goat section. Albendazole (Valbazen) you can order online.

    Dosage for Fenbendazole is 0.23ml per pound of weight given orally for 5 days in a row.
    Dosage for Albendazole is 0.08ml per pound of weight given orally once, then repeat in 10 days.
    upload_2019-6-19_13-55-25.png upload_2019-6-19_13-55-40.png
     
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