Sick Mearns Quail - Please HELP!

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by Ccameron1989, Nov 19, 2016.

  1. Ccameron1989

    Ccameron1989 New Egg

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    Mar 19, 2016
    I have a male mearns quail that is not eating/drinking, is fluffed up, has no interest in anything, sleeping a lot & losing weight quick!
    I have him separated & am keeping him warm but he still refuses to eat/drink. I started force feeding him last night but I am afraid it might be too late. Any idea what it might be?!? Could it be contagious?

    My mearns are special to me and I only have 2 others that "seem" healthy & I'd like to keep them that way!

    [​IMG]
     
  2. Eggcessive

    Eggcessive True BYC Addict

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    I am not familiar with quail, but they can suffer from coccidiosis and ulcerative enteritis. Cocci is treated with Corid (from a feed store) in the water while enteritis is treated with antibiotics, such as tetracycline, penicillin, and others. Do you have a vet nearby who could prescribe antibiotics? Some can be found at feed stores until the end of this year. Here is part of a link about enteritis:

    Ulcerative Enteritis

    Synonyms: quail disease
    Species affected: Captive quail are extremely susceptible and must be maintained on wire-bottom pens or on preventive medications. Chickens, turkeys, partridges, grouse, and other species are occasionally clinically affected.
    Clinical signs: In quail, the disease is acute with high mortality. In chickens, signs are less dramatic. Acute signs are extreme depression and reduction in feed consumption. Affected birds sit humped with eyes closed. Other signs included emaciation, watery droppings streaked with urates, and dull ruffled feathers (see Table 3). Accumulated mortality will reach 50 percent if the flock is not treated.
    Transmission: Birds become infected by direct contact with carrier birds, infected droppings or contaminated pens, feed and water. Bacteria are passed in the droppings of sick and carrier birds. Infection can be spread mechanically on shoes, feed bags, equipment, and from contamination by rodents and pets.
    Treatment: Bacitracin and neomycin can be used singly or in combination. Other antibiotics and drugs such as tetracyclines, penicillin, Lincomycin, and Virginomycin are also effective. Consult a veterinarian for dose, route, and duration of treatment.
    Prevention: Ulcerative enteritis is difficult to prevent in quail. When quail have access to their own droppings, this disease commonly occurs. To eradicate, depopulate stock, thoroughly clean and disinfect, and start over with young, clean stock.
     
    Last edited: Nov 19, 2016
  3. Ccameron1989

    Ccameron1989 New Egg

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    Mar 19, 2016
    Thank you for the information! That is what I am struggling with - which is it (cocci or enteritis)?
    Surprisingly he is still kicking! The heat lamp is keeping him warm & I am force feeing him every 2 hours to keep fluids in him.
    Do you think a bird can come back from this or would it be more humane to cull?
     
  4. Eggcessive

    Eggcessive True BYC Addict

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    I don't think that the bird would do well without medicine if he has enteritis or cocci. Some strains of coccidia can be chronic, and the bird may never live up to it's potential in growth or laying eggs. Enteritis medicines, such as oxytetracycline, Duramycin, and others, and Corid for cocci can be found at most feed stores. I'm glad that he is still fighting.
     
    Last edited: Nov 20, 2016

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