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Silkie chick having seizures

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by Must Be Losing It, May 12, 2008.

  1. Must Be Losing It

    Must Be Losing It Lost It

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    Mar 3, 2008
    Uxbridge MA
    I have not seen much on this subject here, but thought someone may have some experience.

    I have a 4 week old chick who was fine until this morning when I went out to clean the water/food dishes. This chick was sitting by himself (not normal it itself) with his head hanging to the side and looking up at everything w/ one eye. When I went to pick him up he ran also w/ his head to the side and staring up w/ one eye. I isolated him into his old brooder and watched him then have several seizures.

    I've given him some vitamins but I fear he may have had a stroke or a head injury from one of the other chicks. HELP!
     
  2. jessica117

    jessica117 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Apr 23, 2008
    SE Tennessee
    Not completely related, but sort of.... I had a week old chick that we found choking. We got it unchoked and it kept it's head drooped to one side and couldn't move the wing on that same side. It was also spazing out, possibly a seizure, but I don't know that for sure. It was still eating, drinking, and pooping so we just waited. I gave it some vitamin e (took one of the gel caps, broke it open, and mixed it with it's food. Maybe 1/2 a day for a couple days.) Gradually it got better and now I'm happy to say that it is completely recovered and almost 2 months old.

    That's how I found this forum. I was told that there really isn't much brain to damage in a chicken [​IMG]

    I really hope your chickie gets better!

    Jess
     
  3. SpottedCrow

    SpottedCrow Flock Goddess

  4. Must Be Losing It

    Must Be Losing It Lost It

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    Mar 3, 2008
    Uxbridge MA
    Thanks. Since yesterday's beginning of his isolation he seems a little better. I read everything I can find on the issue and it definately seems as though someone gave him a nice rap on the noggin.

    He's still spinning and head tilting and seizing but is a bit better. He eats and drinks although the drinking part is really awkward. I think what is hardest for him is he is away from is flock.

    I'm giving him polyvisol in his water and hopefully that will help as well.

    Thanks for the help!

    Julie
     
  5. Southernbelle

    Southernbelle Gone Broody

    Mar 17, 2008
    Virginia
    So THAT'S what's up with my bird!

    I have one little Silkie chick that always has her head tilted sideways just a bit and seems a little unsteady at times. All in all pretty mild symptoms, eats/poops fine. I thought it was a "factory defect" since she's a hatchery chick.

    It's nice to get that little mystery solved.
     
  6. MaransGuy

    MaransGuy Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Oct 25, 2007
    Greenfield, MA
    Unfortunately, Silkies are prone to this type of problem, especially the ones with the "domed" skulls. It is supposedly a trait that is desireable but I would rather have less-than show quality and healthier birds. I lost a pullet last year that developed partial blindness, followed by horrible depth perception. I tube fed her for two weeks but she never was able to recover. She would peck a couple inches off from where the food was. She was miserable in isolation and perked up alot when put back with the flock. No one bothered her and I let her pass with them out in the coop. I thought it better than having her die in an isolation tub. I now have a showgirl who hatched domed and I watch her every day, nervous about what may happen next.

    Richard
     
  7. Must Be Losing It

    Must Be Losing It Lost It

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    Mar 3, 2008
    Uxbridge MA
    And this little chick (who's not that little anymore) was born w/ a particularly domed head. I agree, I'd rather have a healthy bird than show quality.

    Are there any statistics on recoverability rate? He is no where near a point where I can put him back w/ the others today, but wonder if its possible within the next few weeks.

    Julie
     
  8. MaransGuy

    MaransGuy Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Oct 25, 2007
    Greenfield, MA
    I don't know of any statistics. It really depends on each individual animal and how extensive the injury is. In my case, I am doubting my pullet was even injured. I think it was just a developmental issue. I wish you luck.

    Richard
     
  9. jessica117

    jessica117 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Apr 23, 2008
    SE Tennessee
    He does need to be in isolation, but I worry that when you try to reintroduce him he'll get pecked again. The new guy always gets picked on.

    Jess
     

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