Splayed Leg??? Vitamen B defiency???

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by BarredRockMommy, Apr 26, 2019.

  1. Eggcessive

    Eggcessive Enabler

    43,340
    26,663
    1,012
    Apr 3, 2011
    southern Ohio
    There is no treatment for a twisted tibia according to info I have read. I have never treated it. Many chickens can get around with certain leg problems, but many people end up putting some down if they fail to be able to move around to get food and water. There are some with varus or valgus deformity that can get around as long as there hock tendon holds up. In the last link in my last post, that is an older article, but contains a lot of good info. I would add 2 chicks from his batch in case you end up putting this chick down at some point. If he is a he, and goes to a ranch with other roosters, he would probably be killed with a disabilty, I am afraid.
     
    hispoptart and nightowl223 like this.
  2. BarredRockMommy

    BarredRockMommy Songster

    94
    126
    106
    Mar 6, 2017
    @happyhens1972 1972
    That is why he was separated at the farm, because there was too many and they were trampling him, but maybe one wouldn't pick on him. Thank you so much for your input. Do you own chickens yourself? Have you dealt with this before? Oof I love eggs. I can't even imagine life without them!

    @Eggcessive
    Looking at them still. Soo many words lol!
     
    hispoptart likes this.
  3. happyhens1972

    happyhens1972 Songster

    1,067
    1,097
    236
    Jul 24, 2013
    Worcester, UK
    I have kept chickens for ten years and am totally obsessed! I have dealt with a number of splayed leg issues and one rotation similar to yours but all were 'caught' at, or very shortly after, hatch and all were corrected with manacles made with band-aids and, in the case of the rotation, gentle manipulation three or four times a day. The little lady concerned recovered 100% within a week and went on to be a much loved and productive member of her flock. I also used Nutri-drops in all cases.

    As for eggs, I can eat them IN stuff, like cakes, biscuits, pastries etc but just cant eat them in their 'pure' form...i.e. boiled, scrambled, fried, poached etc. They make me sick within about ten minutes! It's been a life-long thing so I don't ever miss them as part of my diet but people do find it amusing that I keep chicken but don't eat eggs! I currently have fifteen laying girls and my hubby might eat three or four eggs a week but the rest, I give/sell to friends and colleagues or scramble and feed back to the girls as treats :)
     
    nightowl223 likes this.
  4. BarredRockMommy

    BarredRockMommy Songster

    94
    126
    106
    Mar 6, 2017
    Will this work for the time being? I'm gonna try and go to the store on monday. Hopefully I caught this soon enough. If he does get picked on, he will be our little house chicken. Lol. We've had one before, passed away of ripe old age of 9.

    @happyhens1972
    That's so cool! My mother also has that problem, but only with store bought eggs. Not our organic chickens eggs. Weird. Must be the stuff they shove into chickens in those huge egg laying plants.

    Sorry about quality of photos!!!! 20190426_172019.jpg 20190426_172024.jpg
     
  5. Eggcessive

    Eggcessive Enabler

    43,340
    26,663
    1,012
    Apr 3, 2011
    southern Ohio
    B12 is only B12, not what you need. B Complex is what you need. It has B1 thiamine, B2 riboflavin, B3 niacin, and so on. Riboflavin B2 is what you need, and that can be alone or in the B Complex.
     
    hispoptart and nightowl223 like this.
  6. Eggcessive

    Eggcessive Enabler

    43,340
    26,663
    1,012
    Apr 3, 2011
    southern Ohio
    Get B Complex or super B complex: upload_2019-4-26_19-0-30.png
     
    hispoptart and nightowl223 like this.
  7. BarredRockMommy

    BarredRockMommy Songster

    94
    126
    106
    Mar 6, 2017
    I'll get to the store asap
     
    nightowl223 likes this.
  8. I like the visual given in this, but must disagree withthe usage of "knee" in its directions. The entire portion of their legs that are covered in the scaled skin is their "foot," anatomically, so their "knee" is much higher, at the next joint above the one they are calling the knee. The joint they are calling the knee is actually the heel.

    It doesn't change the treatment options, but it could cause serious confusion when discussing the leg treatment(s) needed. Birds walk around on their toes, and the next joint above those toes is always the heel. :idunno So, you always have to be absolutely certain which part someone is calling what part. It's crucial, especially in treatment that could mean a good, happy life, and a short, unhappy, uncomfortable life.
     
  9. While giving the B vitamins (especially the riboflavin), and giving the little one 2 companions, you need to gently rotate that leg to the correct position, and attempt a splint for it, to hold it where it needs to be. Then Coban - which has been the best invention for bandaging since bandages - just not so tight you cut off circulation or depending on the direction you're wrapping, breathing.
     
  10. BarredRockMommy

    BarredRockMommy Songster

    94
    126
    106
    Mar 6, 2017
    Update.
    He's walking very well now and he started using his perch!!!
     

BackYard Chickens is proudly sponsored by: