Tell Me This Is Not CL

cassie

Crowing
10 Years
Mar 19, 2009
6,117
2,280
401
It looks like CL. However, no matter what ANYONE tells you, and that includes your vet, CL really isn't all that big a deal. It can be controlled and eradicated. It does take persistence and commitment, however. When I started breeding goats in the late 60's many herds, including mine were infected with it. You could not go to a show of any size without seeing a goat or two with abscesses. I managed to get rid of CL and the other breeders I know did it too, and we didn't cull CL positive animals either. If you need or want detailed instructions on how to deal with CL, contact me. By the way, the most important thing about controlling the spread of CL is to make sure a ripe abscess doesn't rupture in the barn or corrals where other animals can contact the pus. If you want to know how to lance abscesses so you don't expose other goats I can tell you that, too. I did write up instructions on how to deal with CL and I can send a copy to anyone who wants it. Everything in there has been field tested in multiple herds by multiple breeders. Meaning by doing what it says we got rid of CL and it never came back.
 

chickens really

Crazy Mother of Goat Kids
Premium member
Sep 8, 2015
60,753
105,171
1,637
The Funny Farm....Alberta, Canada
It looks like CL. However, no matter what ANYONE tells you, and that includes your vet, CL really isn't all that big a deal. It can be controlled and eradicated. It does take persistence and commitment, however. When I started breeding goats in the late 60's many herds, including mine were infected with it. You could not go to a show of any size without seeing a goat or two with abscesses. I managed to get rid of CL and the other breeders I know did it too, and we didn't cull CL positive animals either. If you need or want detailed instructions on how to deal with CL, contact me. By the way, the most important thing about controlling the spread of CL is to make sure a ripe abscess doesn't rupture in the barn or corrals where other animals can contact the pus. If you want to know how to lance abscesses so you don't expose other goats I can tell you that, too. I did write up instructions on how to deal with CL and I can send a copy to anyone who wants it. Everything in there has been field tested in multiple herds by multiple breeders. Meaning by doing what it says we got rid of CL and it never came back.
Awesome information. I honestly hope your correct though in this information given...👍❤
 

cassie

Crowing
10 Years
Mar 19, 2009
6,117
2,280
401
Awesome information. I honestly hope your correct though in this information given...👍❤
Put it this way. I raised, bred, and showed dairy goats for over 40 years. For many of those years I ran a commercial dairy and milked over 100 does. I was priviledged to know breeders and dairymen with more goats and more experience than I did.
All of us had experience with CL and all of us got rid of it. In a nutshell, the key to preventing the spread of CL is to prevent other animals from being exposed to pus from a draining abscess. The paper I wrote up tells you how to do this. It is also not based just my own experience either.
 

DellaMyDarling

Songster
Dec 13, 2017
618
862
186
Mass Hilltowns
@cassie
I'll send a PM when I can.

Contacted seller, and she has ability to quarantine her there. So off she goes for now.
I presume step 1 is abscess drain and send to lab, something I have 0 experience doing.

When she arrived I noticed her udder area had a crusty oozy thing going on. 0 pics online or literature about such a condition. Posted on BYH and only really had one response thinking it could by lymph on overdrive. I figured treat with good minerals and supplement.
Now I'm worried it was nasty CL the whole time, spreading all over every goat surface.
My rejected baby got milk from the same farm.

Only "cures" I saw online were started with an $850 lab analyses to develop a vaccine of sorts.
 

cassie

Crowing
10 Years
Mar 19, 2009
6,117
2,280
401
@cassie
I'll send a PM when I can.

Contacted seller, and she has ability to quarantine her there. So off she goes for now.
I presume step 1 is abscess drain and send to lab, something I have 0 experience doing.

When she arrived I noticed her udder area had a crusty oozy thing going on. 0 pics online or literature about such a condition. Posted on BYH and only really had one response thinking it could by lymph on overdrive. I figured treat with good minerals and supplement.
Now I'm worried it was nasty CL the whole time, spreading all over every goat surface.
My rejected baby got milk from the same farm.

Only "cures" I saw online were started with an $850 lab analyses to develop a vaccine of sorts.
None of that is necessary. I treated all abscesses the same. In the scheme of things it doesn't matter if an abscess is CL or not. You don't want the infected material contained therein to be contaminating the premises or exposing other animals whether it is CL, staph, or whatever else it may be. I used a CL vaccine made for sheep and it worked pretty well. I vaccinated my herd with it for a couple years or so. I had friends that had an autogenous vaccine made from pus from their own animals and that worked too. The thing about vaccines is that it will prevent infections in animals that are CL negative but it has no affect on animals that are CL positive. Since without testing I didn't know who was CL positive and who was not, everybody got a shot. I have no way of knowing whether it was the vaccine or the other control measures I used that eradicated CL from my herd. I suspect it was both. At any rate I got rid of CL and it NEVER came back. One thing to keep in mind is that even CL positive animals will usually have just a few abscesses in their lifetime. There are exceptions, but that is the general rule.
 

oldhenlikesdogs

Great Horny Toads
Staff member
Premium member
Jul 16, 2015
37,770
59,017
1,312
central Wisconsin
The nasty part of CL is when abscesses are internal. In my experiences and the reading I have done on it, is it is considered one of the chronic wasting diseases in goats. It isn't always internal, but when it is that's when it causes the most problems. It than can be spread by goats coughing, or drainage out of the nose. The internal one is more common in sheep but it does occur in goats as well.

I personally took it more seriously. I guess it all depends on the strain.
 

cassie

Crowing
10 Years
Mar 19, 2009
6,117
2,280
401
The nasty part of CL is when abscesses are internal. In my experiences and the reading I have done on it, is it is considered one of the chronic wasting diseases in goats. It isn't always internal, but when it is that's when it causes the most problems. It than can be spread by goats coughing, or drainage out of the nose. The internal one is more common in sheep but it does occur in goats as well.

I personally took it more seriously. I guess it all depends on the strain.
You are right about internal abscesses. I personally never ran into this but I have known people who did. This is where vaccination is helpful. Another thing, if you have a wasting goat it might be a good idea to have it tested so you know what you are dealing with. I have had a few goats with wasting disease, but mine were caused by CAE or Johnes. I know because I was enrolled in clinical studies having to do with these two diseases. A friend of mine had a goat that was wasting away and it had leukemia.

Other than testing a wasting goat to see what is wrong with it, your best course is to cull it. Treatment is usually futile and whatever the goat has, it can spread it to other members of the herd.
 
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