The American Cemani Breeders Club...open forum

Discussion in 'General breed discussions & FAQ' started by Steadfast, Mar 13, 2014.

  1. Just didn't want any newbies to get confused :)
     
  2. bluenkimchi

    bluenkimchi Songster

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    @maranfarmer thanks for explaining. I don't use the incubator and have always let the hens naturally brood, that's why I didn't know the difference lol
     
  3. maranfarmer563

    maranfarmer563 Songster

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    I use both incubator and broodys,depending on time of year. I like to hatch my laying hens in February,so they will start laying in August. My hens won't sit til spring,I use silkys and OE std game,fierce mothers in the summer months,
     
  4. Chickengirl1304

    Chickengirl1304 Songster

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    I use the dry hatch method. I have a dickeys incubator and I use it to incubate and then move the eggs to a Styrofoam incubator on day 18. 1-18 my incubator runs at about 21–25% naturally without any water. Day 18– 21 I move them to my Genesis and fill the wells with water to bring it to about 65%.

    This is the best method I have found that works for me. It's amazing though because once in a great while I will forget to move the eggs to the Hatcher and have them hatch right on the Turner. Lol
     
  5. maranfarmer563

    maranfarmer563 Songster

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    Bluenkimchi have you eaten a black meat bird,describe taste and visual hangups,and would it sell. I love to breed new products. My father in law was Robert C Baker Cornell university professor who invented chicken nuggets,chicken hot dogs and the Cornell BBQ sauce that all the fire man use.
     
  6. bluenkimchi

    bluenkimchi Songster

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    Yes, I have [​IMG]

    If you have a good population of Asians or Asian descendent, that will be the majority of customers(might even be the only type of customers). Others are more use to the tasteless white meat store bought chickens in styrofoam cases from the market. Asians value black carcass chickens for it's supposedly "medicinal" properties( I never paid attention to this, just ate it and liked). Though if you research about black chickens online, they do says such things as lower cholesterol, high amnio acid, etc.

    Taste wise, is a sweet meat, that is usually leaner(except silkies, they tend to be more fatty, skin is even thicker too), have an aroma that is a little more gamey/chickeny, but good, same with taste(chickeny, stronger flavor, somewhat like pheasant/guinea fowl). Meat, skin, bones, organs will vary in darkness color, but as it gets cooked, the color will deepen and turn from say a grey raw flesh carcass to a black/er carcass. Over all, a healthier chicken.

    Though, the Asians, like whole chickens and not process into other products or cut up pieces. They usually like their birds live and will process it themselves at home, since some do use it for cultural practice before they kill the bird/s. But mainly just live birds, since they like to have fresh meats, knowing they butcher and clean it themselves.

    So you can market them to the Asians as black meat chickens and they will buy. Though if people knew about the health benefits of FM chicken meats, they would all eat it too. I mean the black color burger and the black hot dog was a huge hit for a while, so I don't see why black meat chickens can't be sold to the public either and be excepted?

    Raw silkie carcass and below after product, notice the color deepens

    [​IMG]


    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Aug 17, 2014
    Tiegrsi likes this.
  7. I have raised and eaten Silky/CornishX meat birds. The carcass is indeed gray when butchered and turns very dark when cooked. The flavor is gamey, which I enjoy.

    I find supermarket chicken virtually tasteless unless covered in spices or marinated.

    I think the average consumer would have a problem with the lack of eye appeal........
     
    Last edited: Aug 17, 2014
  8. maranfarmer563

    maranfarmer563 Songster

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    I figured the fibro chickens would taste good,my dad says he'd have to eat them in the dark lol
     
  9. I have to admit, the first time I cooked one I was rather perturbed at how dark it turned! But the silkie/cornishx is tender and juicy if butchered at about 12 weeks of age after being fed fermented feed. Most of them that I sold were 16/20 weeks old, customers liked them a little bigger.

    I think the cemani would be very popular with the Asian culture.
     
    Last edited: Aug 17, 2014
  10. Double Kindness

    Double Kindness Songster

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    I am part asian and I have many Thai friends, who want my fresh eggs and would have a base of clients, and I also shop the asian markets all the time. Maybe I can get a silkie roo over some cornish x? The local chicken guy has a white silkie roo and some cornish x that he said are about ready to butcher, IDK how many of them are pullets. But I just got a bunch of chicks at the feed store with the intention of them being raised for meat.

    My dog had the same idea, I lost one chick and 1 more is badly injured, several look pecked on, so I separated them out.I'm going to finish this project first. I'm feeding them 26% game bird feed, idk the breeds possibly barred rock, silver laced wyandott, white star?

    I am interested in raising my own meat, so why not black meat? I was just thinking the cemani aren't something I would want to eat, but a sillkie cemani cross, or any of those crossed with a meat bird like black rangers.. idk, just thinking. Or cemani bresse?
     

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