The Evolution of Atlas: A Breeding (and Chat) Thread

1muttsfan

Free Ranging
9 Years
Mar 26, 2011
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Upper Peninsula Michigan
I just read an article on memory loss. It said that you don't get any more forgetful as you age, it just takes longer to remember stuff. When you are young you have lots of free memory space. As you get older and have more data stored, it takes longer for your brain to sort through it. I always picture my brain as a set of filing cabinets, not labeled well, with various random bits of paper and photos sticking out of the drawers :lol:
 

speckledhen

Intentional Solitude
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13 Years
Feb 3, 2007
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Blue Ridge Mtns. of North Georgia
I just read an article on memory loss. It said that you don't get any more forgetful as you age, it just takes longer to remember stuff. When you are young you have lots of free memory space. As you get older and have more data stored, it takes longer for your brain to sort through it. I always picture my brain as a set of filing cabinets, not labeled well, with various random bits of paper and photos sticking out of the drawers :lol:
So, what you're saying is my BYC calendar is in a drawer and I can't find it, right? LOL.
 

getaclue

Enabler
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Jun 19, 2013
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I just read an article on memory loss. It said that you don't get any more forgetful as you age, it just takes longer to remember stuff. When you are young you have lots of free memory space. As you get older and have more data stored, it takes longer for your brain to sort through it. I always picture my brain as a set of filing cabinets, not labeled well, with various random bits of paper and photos sticking out of the drawers :lol:
In addition, you have 2 main filing cabinets. 1 for short term memory, and 1 for long term memory. Short term memory not only holds new information for a short time, but is the sorting center as to whether the new information can be discarded, or whether it gets moved, into long term memory. Chemo does damage to the short term memory, thus chemo brain. New information is not not always readily available, like it should be, and sometimes the same information has to be studied more than once, so the short term memory realizes it needs to be stored in long term memory, and not discarded.

That information saved me a lot of frustration. In the beginning, after chemo, I could read things, and know them, but couldn't recall them correctly. I knew it was happening, and it frustrated me to no end. Now, I have built up some new neuropathways, so it's become a bit easier dealing with short term memory, BUT I know to read the key parts of any new information twice. That signals the brain that it's important information, and to move it into long term memory. Anything I can't access correctly at first, usually within a few days, when it's moved into long term memory, I can remember it just fine.
 

seminolewind

Flock Mistress
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Sep 6, 2007
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Interesting. But what your describing sounds more like RAM and Hard drive! :lau:lau

Now, anyone have more and more problems with balance or tripping??? Chemo is a nasty drug, but vital. I'm on 2 drugs that starve the cancer of hormones-the food they like best.
 

seminolewind

Flock Mistress
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Sep 6, 2007
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Corydon, Indiana
Me, who didn't cook for 14 years now has a new kitchen and do cook , let's say infrequently. But mostly special meals. I actually cooked Thanksgiving last year. So my endeavor for Tuesday is inviting DD and family over and making lamb shanks, Spaetzla (german noodles?) with pan fried onions, garlic, and butter, and a salad that is heavier on the cukes and tomatoes and less lettuce and actually lots of parsley chopped up. Then I have a dressing to make that's olive oil, vinegar, lemon, and something called pomegranate molasses. So should be good. I never thought I'd like lamb but the recipe makes them yummy.
 
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