Too many blood spots to be normal.

Discussion in 'Chicken Behaviors and Egglaying' started by fowltemptress, Jun 19, 2008.

  1. fowltemptress

    fowltemptress Frugal Fan Club President

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    I recently discovered a home near me that sells eggs from their backyard chickens. I bought a dozen, broke two yesterday for fried egg sandwiches, and both eggs had blood spots. Okay, I'm used to seeing that occasionally, and it was just the luck of the draw that I got two of those eggs in my dozen. I fished the offending spots out and ate my sandwich without giving it another thought.
    Earlier this morning, I cracked open two more eggs for scrambled eggs . . . blood spots. By now I'm suspicious and decide to candle the rest of the eggs, and they all have blood spots (to ward off the suggestion before it pops up in any replies, no, there is no chance these are developing embryos).
    My first thought is these chickens have a worm infestation of some sort, and naturally I will go back today to inform the owner of my concerns.
    My question is, should I be concerned about eating these eggs or giving them to my animals? I know worms rarely pop up in the egg itself, and I would assume a thorough cooking would kill anything that did. The only evidence of a problem is there are too many blood spots to be a coincidence, and that is not sufficiently unsettling enough for me to think tossing out and wasting the eggs is justified. But maybe I'm wrong and there is a risk I'm overlooking. Anyone know, other than the grossness factor, any reason I should not continue eating the rest of my dozen?
     
  2. fowltemptress

    fowltemptress Frugal Fan Club President

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    Oh, yes, I almost forgot . . . are there other reasons for an unusual number of blood spots, so that I can try to help out the woman who sold me the eggs? I saw her coop set up, and it seemed clean and the chickens well cared for. I'm wondering why none of her other customers have brought up the spots, but then, I did almost miss the spots in the eggs this morning. I suppose it is possible no one inspects their eggs as closely as I do.
     
  3. MissPrissy

    MissPrissy Overrun With Chickens Premium Member

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    I don't see anything wrong with your eggs. Blood spots are normal. Usually they are so small you don't see them with the naked eye. I have one hen that I can always count on to have a spot or two in her eggs. There is nothing at all wrong with her and she does not have worms. Blood spots is not an indication of worm infestations. It can be simply hens under heat stress. The blood spots is just like a meat spot - it is in the plumbing of the egg factory.

    We have been so conditioned to the perfect egg - no blemishes, pristine white, perfect whites and yellow yolk - by the commercial egg industry that most people don't realize those eggs aren't the norm. Raise enough chickens and you'll see all sorts of things.

    The eggs are fine.
     
  4. fowltemptress

    fowltemptress Frugal Fan Club President

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    I've never encountered every single egg in a batch having such an obvious spot, though. That tells me there is some problem with the chickens. She had about twenty or twenty five hens with no rooster messing with them and a coop with an air conditioning hook up (oh, to be so lucky and have the means to do that for my animals!). I find it very hard to believe these chickens would be normal and still all manage to have sizable blood spots, unless it is a regular thing with a couple of her hens and I managed to get eggs from only those hens (I had a hen like that once, too), but I find that unlikely out of that many chickens. I can think of two things that could have stressed so many hens out at once . . . some predator managed to get into the hen area and scare the bejeezus out of them while they were enjoying their air conditioning (getting through a yard with dogs and a well maintained run with a roof. Maybe a snake?), or worms.
    I believe I will continue to eat the eggs, but I still think there is enough cause for concern to inform this woman she should get her hens checked out.
    LOL, I can't remember the last time I had a "pristine" egg . . .
     
  5. fowltemptress

    fowltemptress Frugal Fan Club President

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    Come to think of it, my art teacher in high school had air conditioning, heating, and light hookups for his dog houses, as well as real carpeting. Is this more popular than I think for people to do for their animals?
    Okay, I'm getting off topic on my own thread . . . sorry.
     
  6. MissPrissy

    MissPrissy Overrun With Chickens Premium Member

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    Can you eat eggs with blood spots?
    Eggs with a visible blood spot on the yolk are safe for consumption. The spot can be removed with the tip of a knife. Blood or "meat" spots are occasionally found on an egg yolk. These tiny spots are not harmful and are caused by the rupture of a blood vessel during formation of the egg. Blood spots do not indicate a fertilized egg. Mass candling methods reveal most blood spots and those eggs are removed, but even with electronic spotters, it is impossible to catch all of them. If desired, the spot can be removed with the tip of a clean knife prior to cooking. These eggs are safe to eat.

    http://whatscookingamerica.net/Eggs/FAQ.htm

    #8 What are blood spots?

    Blood spots occur naturally in less than 1% of all egg produced. These should be caught in the processing line, but rarely small blood spots slip through. Blood spots can also form after the egg leaves the packing plant. Blood spots most often occur as the yolk ruptures out of the hen’s ovary. A trace amount of blood attaches to the yolk and stays there as the egg is formed. Sometimes, due to rough handling, a blood spot can form after the eggs leave the processing plant. Blood spots are not signs of fertility. Blood spots do not mean that the egg is bad. Small blood spots can be picked off and the egg still used.

    http://www.chinovalleyranchers.com/eggfacts.htm

    "Blood" and "meat" spots are caused by the rupture of a blood vessel on the yolk surface during formation of the egg or by a similar accident in the wall of the oviduct. Many factors contribute to the spots: breed, feed, condition of the hens, etc. Both chemically and nutritionally these eggs are fine to eat. They are food safe if the egg has been properly stored in the refrigerator.

    If desired, use the tip of a knife to remove the spot
    http://www.solutions.uiuc.edu/content.cfm?item=175&series=3

    Where do Blood Spots Come From?
    When a new egg is ready to be made, a mature yolk is released from it's follicle in the ovary. Usually, the follicle bursts along a line that contains few, if any blood vessels (called the stigma). Sometimes it doesn't tear exactly along this stigma and a tiny blood vessel will get torn when the egg is being released.. The blood that escapes ends up on the egg. It is harmless.

    http://www.minkhollow.ca/HatchingProgram/Candling/Fresh/Blood-Spot.html

    I still maintain there is nothing wrong with her hens.​
     
  7. Tuffoldhen

    Tuffoldhen Flock Mistress

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    There is nothing wrong with blood or meat spots...some young pullets and even older hens throw these out, it has to do with a tiny rupture in the egg laying cycle...in a grocery store egg they have been scanned or screened to detect such eggs and are not used for carton eggs......Mine have laid these once in awhile...

    Has nothing to do with a hen and worms....
     
  8. fowltemptress

    fowltemptress Frugal Fan Club President

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    Well, live and learn. I went for more eggs and mentioned all the blood spots, and how I had been worried, but nothing more since the consensus is this all lies well within normalcy. Thanks!
     

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