Water, feed, and roost tweaks? Would like some tips.

The Coop-D-etat

Songster
Feb 6, 2021
105
432
123
Bismarck, North Dakota
The only thing that hasn’t been mentioned is the metal roof on your nesting box. Just be careful cause the edges are really sharp. Chickens get to crazy places and could cut themselves badly.
Right! I actually have been thinking about it myself. with ways to basically chicken proof the roof. It was scrap from the roof when I was building the coop itself. I was thinking those foam pool noodles but im thinking they could peck it. I've also thought plastic tubing and just slitting it and slipping it on the edges. And also just sanding it down. I haven't quite decided yet. 😅
 

AFG

In the Brooder
Sep 28, 2019
6
12
18
The birds will peck at the paint and any "spots" that appear on it, especially as composite/chip board starts to loosen up over time, lots of cracks for dust to settle onto. I like tile board (basically 4 x 8 sheets of whiteboard) which is pretty cheap, very smooth, and anything that the birds do NOT need traction on, I make out of that. I would suggest sheathing the interior with that. I've also had the birds consume any insulation that has been waiting for the next project. Rigid foam-board and blanket type, but I haven't had any fiberglass lying around at least! "WHY?" I've asked myself, what in nature is that yummy and has the texture of that? Of course our birds are pretty far removed from jungle fowl...

You said you've got lots of ventilation, but only talked about sealing the windows, etc. up tight, I assume that is because of where the windows are right at the roosts. There is a fantastic article on BYC about ventilation and the general guideline is 1sqft per chicken. I'm in northern VT, so cold and lots of snow as well. I've never had frostbite issues, but I did follow those guidelines.

You could also send roost bars to the back wall (like an E with 4 "fingers", adding probably almost 8 feet of roosting space where you won't be needing to stand. Obviously you know that 2x4's flat are the best roosts!

If you just changed the bottom attachment of the ladder, it would be fine. Lift the lower end up 18" or so, they can hop onto the ladder then walk up to the roost. Looks like you've got enough space between the treads on the ladder to get an ice chipper or wide putty knife in there to scrape which is pretty easy, so even if it catches poop, won't be much of a big deal.

From the tool brands I see in the photo, you either do your homework, or know building! Nice framing and general construction techniques too!
 

Vicker

Songster
6 Years
Jun 28, 2014
165
285
148
Texas
Lots of comments. I haven't read them all. My first impression is with the nest box. If there isn't a landing bar, is there enough room for them to fly up and land under the top? I also tend to see more than one roost bar in a coop.
 

The Coop-D-etat

Songster
Feb 6, 2021
105
432
123
Bismarck, North Dakota
The birds will peck at the paint and any "spots" that appear on it, especially as composite/chip board starts to loosen up over time, lots of cracks for dust to settle onto. I like tile board (basically 4 x 8 sheets of whiteboard) which is pretty cheap, very smooth, and anything that the birds do NOT need traction on, I make out of that. I would suggest sheathing the interior with that. I've also had the birds consume any insulation that has been waiting for the next project. Rigid foam-board and blanket type, but I haven't had any fiberglass lying around at least! "WHY?" I've asked myself, what in nature is that yummy and has the texture of that? Of course our birds are pretty far removed from jungle fowl...

You said you've got lots of ventilation, but only talked about sealing the windows, etc. up tight, I assume that is because of where the windows are right at the roosts. There is a fantastic article on BYC about ventilation and the general guideline is 1sqft per chicken. I'm in northern VT, so cold and lots of snow as well. I've never had frostbite issues, but I did follow those guidelines.

You could also send roost bars to the back wall (like an E with 4 "fingers", adding probably almost 8 feet of roosting space where you won't be needing to stand. Obviously you know that 2x4's flat are the best roosts!

If you just changed the bottom attachment of the ladder, it would be fine. Lift the lower end up 18" or so, they can hop onto the ladder then walk up to the roost. Looks like you've got enough space between the treads on the ladder to get an ice chipper or wide putty knife in there to scrape which is pretty easy, so even if it catches poop, won't be much of a big deal.

From the tool brands I see in the photo, you either do your homework, or know building! Nice framing and general construction techniques too!
Wow! Thank you so much for your in depth response!

For the paint would it change in any fact that the coop isn't OSB on the outside. I have water proof tyvec on all surfaces outside followed by cement board wood look siding on the outside. It was spendy but with the massive hail storms that roll through here I didn't want a more brittle siding that I'd have to replace every two or so years. Besides that is it still advised that I shouldn't paint the OSB? I should have thought about putting up some sort of sheathing on the inside but it just passed my mind. The only thing is that I thought of was if I did dedice to sheath the inside I would have to tack it on to the exposed framing posts and then in turn have a empty void in between the wall and the walling material. And I'm bit to fond on the idea of that there would be an exposed "void" or gap of empty space for something to call home whether it be mice or what have you. Do you have any other recommendations? I thought of tacking on vinyl or linoleum sheets in between the beams but that also wouldn't work i don't think because those beams aren't perfectly straight and making a perfect cut for a good seemless bond. I was also thinking of using that flex seal paint on the lower half of the coop and painting the upper half with the normal house paint I got. But I am a little on the fense about that cause we'll it's liquid rubber and know that it's chalked full of things ya really don't want in a hen house

As for the ventilation I didn't go off a planned venting plan. I used spray foam insulation around the windows for a good seal and have trim to put around the windows so the birds won't be able to access and peck at it whatsoever. On the side of the nesting boxes you see in the picture at the top I have open vents with soffit and fascia on the outside and directly across from it I have a vent that you would see on a house above the door. I would assume that would be plenty but if I need to, will have no problem adding more.

That is a BRILLIANT idea about the roosts!! Now that is the input I like to hear! Never really thought about laying it out like that! I am actually getting 10 birds so the most roosting space I can get is ideal. Thank you for that idea!!!

And thank you I appreciate your compliment! I've been meticulously planning this coop out for about 5 years 😅 and finally have moved to a place where I can have chickens again, AND no ordinances! so I will be obtaining a rooster with my order of chicks. I am pretty used to framing out small out buildings cause I've built out the inside of job trailers for our crew members and sheds and such. I have certainly have been doing my homework to make sure it's the best setup the birds could have and being functional at the same time!! How many times I've sat down and drawn out plans I can't even say 😅 that's also why I came and asked these questions on this thread to get the final "touches" on the Broody Brothel (my coops name🤣) I will eventually add on to the coop. But I'm happy that this place I bought had an old rust dump garden shed ON a concrete foundation which is a big plus Imo.

I appreciate anymore input! As this is what I made this thread for. All the peoples input has helped me immensely and I very much appreciate the time given to me. This is what I'm looking for!
 

The Coop-D-etat

Songster
Feb 6, 2021
105
432
123
Bismarck, North Dakota
Lots of comments. I haven't read them all. My first impression is with the nest box. If there isn't a landing bar, is there enough room for them to fly up and land under the top? I also tend to see more than one roost bar in a coop.
I actually have added a land bar to the nesting boxes 😅 I will be working on the coop this weekend some to make a few adjustments. And will certainly post more updated pics of the coop when done with said adjustments. Thank you very much for your input! I really appreciate it!
 

The Coop-D-etat

Songster
Feb 6, 2021
105
432
123
Bismarck, North Dakota
You could always just but metal trim on the nest box "roof". It isn't "sharp" like the sides of the roof itself can be. (And no worries about them trying to eat it! LOL)
Lol that's a very good idea. I mean I've already invested a decent amount into this coop a little more won't hurt. I'm all for recycling and re and using materials but I literally have NOTHING available haha. Very good idea though. That's most likely what I will do with that. Just makes sense. I'm very scattered braind about all the little things I need/can do I loose track. But that is what my LIST is for 🤣😅
 

U_Stormcrow

Crowing
Jun 7, 2020
1,622
3,494
286
North FL Panhandle Region / Wiregrass
add my name to the list of those recommending removing the ramp - then I'd lower the roost board, such that its still above the nest, but a little easier for them to jump up to, and more importantly, a little more below any drafts from your windows.

Windows and other ventilation are key to keeping moisture down, particularly if you put water in. Tell me, is your concrete floor installed over a moisture barrier or does it "weep" in the cold and/or wet???
 

The Coop-D-etat

Songster
Feb 6, 2021
105
432
123
Bismarck, North Dakota
add my name to the list of those recommending removing the ramp - then I'd lower the roost board, such that its still above the nest, but a little easier for them to jump up to, and more importantly, a little more below any drafts from your windows.

Windows and other ventilation are key to keeping moisture down, particularly if you put water in. Tell me, is your concrete floor installed over a moisture barrier or does it "weep" in the cold and/or wet???
I have no idea, I'm assuming not. When I moved here it was just an old tin garden shed sitting on a concrete slab. I since then tore down the shed and built my coop on it. As I said I would assume not but have no idea in reality
 

The Coop-D-etat

Songster
Feb 6, 2021
105
432
123
Bismarck, North Dakota
add my name to the list of those recommending removing the ramp - then I'd lower the roost board, such that its still above the nest, but a little easier for them to jump up to, and more importantly, a little more below any drafts from your windows.

Windows and other ventilation are key to keeping moisture down, particularly if you put water in. Tell me, is your concrete floor installed over a moisture barrier or does it "weep" in the cold and/or wet???
Also, I have never myself seen it weep with moisture through last winter or this one, it is bone dry. I was surprised to see that my snow track I left in there when I was tinkering in there that it had melted and stayed in liquid form and didn't freeze and that was in 15° weather. I know that doesn't have anything to do with moisture leeching through the floor but still seems to do the trick
 

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