What is the purpose of the albumin and

Discussion in 'Incubating & Hatching Eggs' started by Arielle, Jul 29, 2011.

  1. Arielle

    Arielle Chicken Obsessed

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    where does it go by the time a chick hatches???

    I understand the initial purpose is to suspend the yolk in the middle of the egg and albumin but by the end of 21 days of incubating the albumin is gone. Can someone explain this Houdini act?
     
  2. Lacrystol

    Lacrystol Hatching Helper

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    Good question, I would like to know too.
     
  3. 2overeasy000

    2overeasy000 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I always thought the white became the bird and the yolk was its food, but I could be wrong.
     
  4. Arielle

    Arielle Chicken Obsessed

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    2 overeasy wrote:
    I always thought the white became the bird and the yolk was its food, but I could be wrong.

    A very good guess, but I think since the yolk feeds the dividing cells of the germ which divides and multiplies and becomes the embryo, I don't see how the albumin helps with the growth of the embryo. THis is confusing for sure. HELP!​
     
  5. HeadlessChicken

    HeadlessChicken Out Of The Brooder

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    The albumen maintains homoeostasis around the embryo, provides defence against microbial attack and supplies nutrients to the embryo.

    More is available here if you are interested.

    Jack
     
  6. Arielle

    Arielle Chicken Obsessed

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    Jack, THank you,this was an amazing read. Great detail on the function of the albumin and it's ability to stop bacteria in many different ways; to provide protein and other nutrients to the chick; and cushion the yolk/embryo.

    2overeasy, you said it very susinctly.
    I always thought the white became the bird and the yolk was its food, but I could be wrong.​
     

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