What's in the poop?

lindaDH

Chirping
Oct 15, 2018
31
42
59
Northern CA
Hello! I'm new to the group, started reading about five months ago when we got our first chicks, very helpful and fun to read. This morning I was greeted by unfamiliar looking poop. I've consulted the chicken poop chart, handy indeed, but I'm still not sure. My first guess was shead intestinal lining, which I'm hoping for. But since I'm a novice I'd like other opinions. So Ladies and Gents, I kindly ask; What's in this poop?
Thank you!
Linda
 

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coach723

Free Ranging
6 Years
Feb 12, 2015
6,534
10,931
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North Florida
Does look like shed lining. Can you get a fecal test done? The droppings also look runny/mucousy which could be from worms, a fecal would rule that out or in. I see those kind of droppings sometimes when mine are due for worming. I'm sure you will get diverse opinions, but that is what I would do.
 

rebrascora

Free Ranging
5 Years
Feb 14, 2014
7,127
8,753
556
Consett Co.Durham. UK
I would agree with @coach723 and yourself that it appears to be shed intestinal lining. How old was the chick that passed this? Some intestinal shed can be normal ... I tend to see it at about 7-10 weeks... but it can also be as a result of worms or coccidia. I too would recommend getting a faecal float test done, as it will check for both of those types of parasites. If your local vet is not willing to perform it without seeing the bird, than a sample can be sent of to your state diagnostics lab. I believe the CA facilities are very reasonably priced.
 

lindaDH

Chirping
Oct 15, 2018
31
42
59
Northern CA
I would agree with @coach723 and yourself that it appears to be shed intestinal lining. How old was the chick that passed this? Some intestinal shed can be normal ... I tend to see it at about 7-10 weeks... but it can also be as a result of worms or coccidia. I too would recommend getting a faecal float test done, as it will check for both of those types of parasites. If your local vet is not willing to perform it without seeing the bird, than a sample can be sent of to your state diagnostics lab. I believe the CA facilities are very reasonably priced.
Thank you for your advice. I have three birds, two hens, and one rooster. I'm not sure which gifted me this sample, but all three are about 5 months old.
 

rebrascora

Free Ranging
5 Years
Feb 14, 2014
7,127
8,753
556
Consett Co.Durham. UK
Oh gosh, your poor girls are probably in for a rough ride with only two of them to keep an adolescent cockerel "entertained". Totally unrelated to your poop issue but has he started mating with them yet? Don't be surprised if you start to see bald patches appearing on necks, shoulders and backs when he does. Cockerels (immature roosters under a year old) can be brutal when their hormones kick in and ideally, many more girls should be kept with them to share the burden or pen the male separately. Some breeds can be less rampant than others but it can lead to injuries (scalping or flank gashes), so keep a close eye on things. At 5 months old it is less likely to be coccidiosis as they should have developed resistance to that by now. You could combine a sample from each bird and send it off for a faecal float. That will give you an overall flock reading for worm eggs or if one of them is looking less thrift, then get their sample checked.
 

lindaDH

Chirping
Oct 15, 2018
31
42
59
Northern CA
Oh gosh, your poor girls are probably in for a rough ride with only two of them to keep an adolescent cockerel "entertained". Totally unrelated to your poop issue but has he started mating with them yet? Don't be surprised if you start to see bald patches appearing on necks, shoulders and backs when he does. Cockerels (immature roosters under a year old) can be brutal when their hormones kick in and ideally, many more girls should be kept with them to share the burden or pen the male separately. Some breeds can be less rampant than others but it can lead to injuries (scalping or flank gashes), so keep a close eye on things. At 5 months old it is less likely to be coccidiosis as they should have developed resistance to that by now. You could combine a sample from each bird and send it off for a faecal float. That will give you an overall flock reading for worm eggs or if one of them is looking less thrift, then get their sample checked.
Thank you! About the rooster; he was supposed to be a hen! Even worse-- he's a Brahma and just huge! We love him, but he has started to mate indeed. The Black Star has been furiously fending him off for several weeks, and he's just turned his attention to the less mature Wynadotte who isn't happy with him either. But at night they tuck in together and it's a very sweet picture.
 

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